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TITF. 

CEREMONIES 

OBSERVED   IN   THE    SENATE-HOUSE 

OF    THE 

UNIVERSITY    OF    CAMBRIDGE: 

WITH 


OF 

PROCEEDING  TO  ALL  DEGREES, 

THE    MANNER    OF 

ELECTING    OFFICERS, 

TABLES  OF  FEES, 

AND 

OTHER  ARTICLES  RELATING  TO  THE  UNIVERSITY. 
BY  ADAM  WALL,  M.A. 

V    NEW   EDITION: 

BY    HENRY    GUNNING,    M.A, 

OF    CHRIST    COLLEGE, 
SENIOR  ESQUIRE  BEDELL 


CAMBRIDGE: 

Printed  by  J.  Smith,  Printer  to . the  University; 

1.827 


ADVERTISEMENT. 


THE  changes,  which  have  taken  place  in  the 
System  of  Education  in  this  University,  since  the 
publication  by  Mr.  Wall  in  1798,  have  rendered 
a  new  Edition  of  his  Book  highly  necessary ; 
these  alterations  the  Editor  hopes  that  he  has 
stated  correctly.  To  those,  who  are  thoroughly 
acquainted  with  the  Customs  and  Ceremonies  of  the 
University,  the  Editor  feels  some  apology  is  due 
for  the  minuteness,  with  which  he  has  detailed 
them.  Had  the  Book  been  intended  for  their 
use  solely,  he  should  have  adopted  a  very  different 
plan.  But  then  it  would  have  conveyed  little 
or  no  information  to  that  very  numerous  Class, 
who  are  desirous  of  proceeding  to  their  Degrees, 
but  are  utterly  at  a  loss  what  steps  to  take  for 
that  purpose.  He  trusts  that  he  has  enabled 
such  Persons  to  ascertain  at  once  (without  troubling 
their  friends  with  repeated  enquiries)  what  they 
have  to  do,  and  what  they  have  to  pay.  If  in 
this  he  has  succeeded,  he  will  not  have  entirely 
lost  his  labor. 

The  Editor  begs  to  return  his  sincere  ac- 
knowledgements to  the  Syndics  of  the  Press  for 
their  liberality  in  defraying  thr  oxpences  of  this 
publication. 


CUSTOMS 


AND 


CEREMONIES 


OF    THE 


UNIVERSITY     OF     CAMBRIDGE 


IHtcfjarlmao  Dai). 

THERE  are  two  Sermons  at  St.  Mary's 
Church. 

After  the  Sermon  in  the  morning,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  in  his  scarlet  gown,  and  the  Proctors, 
with  their  hoods  squared,  wait  in  the  vestry, 
till  notice  is  given  them  that  the  Mayor,  &c. 
are  in  readiness  to  receive  them.  They  then 
proceed  to  the  Town-Hall.  The  Heads  of 
Houses  and  the  Doctors,  who  were  at  Church, 
sometimes  accompany  them. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  sits  on  the  right  hand 
of  the  Mayor,  the  Proctors  on  the  lower  seat. 

The  Senior  Proctor  administers  the  following 
Oath  of  Office  to  the  Mayor,  from  the  Statute 
Book,  p.  538. 


You  shall  swear,  that  you  shall  observe  and  keep, 
so  far  forth  as  in  you  lieth,  the  liberties  and  customs 
of  this  University,  as  concerning  the  keeping  of  the 
peace,  and  also  the  assize  of  bread,  and  ale,  and  other 
victuals ;  and  that  you  shall  not  unduly,  nor  of  malice, 
impugn  the  other  liberties  and  due  customs  of  the  said 
University,  as  far  forth  as  you  shall  have  knowledge 
thereof. 

So  God  help  you,  through  Christ  Jesus. 

The  Proctor  administers  the  same  oath  to  the 
four  Bailiffs,  and  receives  of  them,  or  of  the 
Treasurer  of  the  Corporation,  three  shillings  and 
fourpence,  for  the  search  of  leather,  which  he 
pays  to  the  University  chest,  at  the  Audit. 

Clmtm  on  tfjr  Dap  fcfforr  ftttffjarlmae  flTcrm 
ftrgitt*. 

On  the  ninth  of  October  (being  the  day  before 
the  Term  begins)  the  Regius  Professor  in  Di- 
vinity, or  some  person  appointed  by  him,  preaches 
a  sermon  "  ad  Clerum,"  at  St.  Mary's  Church,  at 
ten  o'clock. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine. 

If  the  ninth  fall  on  a  Sunday,  there  is  no 
English  sermon  at  St.  Mary's  in  the  morning. 

The  Professor  in  his  cope  is  conducted  *  to 
the  vestry  by  a  Bedell. 

The  Doctors  in  Divinity  are  in  their  copes ; 
Doctors  in  the  other  Faculties,  in  their  robes; 
the  Proctors  in  their  Congregation  habit. 

1  Of  late  years  this  has  been  discontinued. 


The  Professor  may  appoint  a  Doctor  or  a 
Bachelor  in  Divinity,  or  a  Candidate  for  either 
degree,  to  preach  this  Clerum  for  him,  which  is 
allowed  as  an  exercise  for  the  degree. 

If  a  Doctor  preach,  he  comes  from  his  College 
to  the  vestry  with  his  cap  on,  attended2  by  a 
Bedell. 

If  the  Clerum  be  preached  by  a  Bachelor  of 
Divinity,  he  comes,  with  his  cap  off  and  in  a 
Doctor's  cope,  attended  by  a  BedelP. 

If  it  be  preached  by  a  Candidate  for  the 
degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity,  who  is  already 
a  Bachelor  of  the  Faculty,  he  comes  in  a  cope: 
but  if  he  commence  per  saltum,  he  comes  in 
the  habit  of  a  Non-Regent  :  if  by  a  Candidate 
for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  he  comes 
with  his  cap  off  (attended  by  a  Bedell2)  and  in 
the  habit  of  a  Non-Regent. 


for  t$e  Domination  of  tfroctor** 

Two  Colleges  are  every  year  to  nominate 
Persons  for  Proctors,  in  the  order  prescribed  in 
a  Cycle  of  fifty-one  years  ; 

i  Collegium  Trinitatis. 
\CollegiumCaii- 

i  QOQ  I  Collegium  Johannis. 

iSLS  .....  \  Collegium  Petri. 

2  This  has  been  discontinued  of  late  years. 
A  2 


j  Collegium  Christi. 
1829 1  Aula  Claras. 

j  Collegium  Regale. 
18JO \  Collegium  Corporis  Christi. 

( Collegium  Trinitatis. 
1831 1  Aula  Pembrochiae. 

|  Collegium  Johannis. 
1832 \  Collegium  Jesu. 

f  Collegium  Reginale. 
1833 1  Collegium  Magdalenae. 

f  Collegium  Petri. 
1834 1  Aula  Catharinae. 

{  Collegium  Regale. 
1835 (.  Collegium  Sidney  Sussex. 

f  Collegium  Trinitatis. 
I83b 1  Collegium  Emmanuelis. 

f  Collegium  Johannis. 
1837 *  I  Collegium  Christi. 

f  Aula  Clara?. 
'I  Aula  Pembrochiae. 

(  Collegium  Caii. 
1  Collegium  Corporis  Christi, 

f  Collegium  Regale. 
1840 {  Collegium  Reginale. 

(  Collegium  Trinitatis. 
kl (Collegium  Jesu. 

f  Collegium  Johannis. 
1842 1  Collegium  Petri. 


1843.  .  .  . 

1844 

1845 

1846 

1847.  .  .  . 

1848.  .  .  . 

1849.  .  .  . 

1850.  .  .  . 

1851.  .  .  . 
1852 

1853.  .  .  . 

1854.  .  . . 

1855 

1856.  , 


|  Collegium  Chris ti. 
'  ( Collegium  Magdalenae. 

f  Collegium  Regale. 
'{  Aula  Catharinae. 


Trinitatis. 
*1  Aula  Pembrochiae. 

(  Collegium  Johannis. 
'(  Collegium  Sidney  Sussex. 

I  Aula  Clarae. 
'(Collegium  Emmanuelis. 

f  Collegium  Reginale. 
'I  Collegium  Caii. 

{Collegium  Regale. 
Aula  Trinitatis. 

|  Collegium  Trinitatis. 
'(  Collegium  Corporis  Christi, 

f  Collegium  Johannis. 
'(  Collegium  Petri. 

f  Aula  Pembrochiae. 
'(Collegium  Christi. 

(  Collegium  Regale. 
'  ( Collegium  Magdalenae. 

|  Collegium  Trinitatis. 
'(  Collegium  Jesu. 

f  Collegium  Johannis. 
'  ( Aula  Clarae. 

|  Collegium  Reginale. 
'(Collegium  Sidney  Sussex. 


1857.  ,       • 


l  Collegium  Emmanuelis. 


i  Q  *«  J  Collegium  Regale. 

1858 1  Aula  Catharinae. 


,  ^ — ~fe,««.  Trinitatis. 
1859 1  Collegium  Petri. 

I  Collegium  Johannis. 
1  Collegium  Christi. 

i  O*M  f  Aula  Pembroehiae. 

'1  Collegium  Corporis  Christi. 

<  Collegium  Reginale. 
1852 lAulaClarae. 

f  Collegium  Regale. 
*\  Collegium  Magdalense. 

T  Q  « /i  f  Collegium  Trinitatis. 

i  Collegium  Jesu. 

i  Q  £  K  I  Collegium  Johannis . 

>5 1  Collegium  Petri. 

r  Collegium  Christi. 
'  (  Collegium  Sidney  Sussex. 

1 867  (  Collegium  Caii. 

'  * "  '1  Collegium  Emmanuelis. 

T  Q«Q  /  Collegium  Regale. 

'  1  Aula  Pembrochize. 

T  Q«A  I  Collegium  Trinitatis. 

••"I  Aula  Catharines. 

|  Collegium  Johannis. 
'( Collegium  Reginale 


1871. 


1872. 


|  Collegium  Christi. 
*1  Collegium  Petri. 

f  Collegium  Regale. 
'I  Aula  Clarse. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Trinitatis. 
' I  Collegium  Corporis  Christi. 

f  Collegium  Johannis. 
"t Collegium  Magdalense. 

(  Aula  Pembrochise. 
'I  Collegium  Jesu. 

(  Collegium  Reginale. 
'  I Collegium  Sidney  Sussex. 

f  Collegium  Regale. 
'1  Collegium  Emmanuelis. 


In  which  period,  King's,  Trinity,  and  St.  John's 
Colleges  have,  each  of  them,  eleven  turns. 

St.  Peter's,  Christ's,  Queen's  Colleges,  and 
Pembroke  Hall,  have,  each  of  them,  seven. 

Clare  Hall  has  six. 

Corpus  Christi,  Jesus,  Caius,  Magdalene, 
Emmanuel  and  Sidney  Colleges,  have,  each  of 
them,  five. 

Catharine  Hall  has  four. 

Trinity  Hall  has  one.  Decret.  Prefect.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  489- 

Each  of  the  two  Colleges  nominates  one 
person. 


8 

The  person  nominated  may  be  a  Regent  or 
a  Non-Regent  Master. 

If  he  be  a  Regent,  he  must  be  in  the  third 
year  of  his  Regency  at  least. 

He  must  be  presented  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
in  the  presence  of  the  Registrary,  by  the  Head 
of  his  College,  or  by  some  one  in  his  name,  before 
the  first  day  of  August. 

The  Persons  thus  nominated  and  presented 
are  necessarily  elected3,  unless  a  lawful  cause  or 
objection  be,  before  the  first  day  of  October 
"coram  Pro-Cancellario  allegata"  and  "  probata 
et  approbata  coram  eodem  et  majore  parte  Prce- 
positorum  Collegiorum"  within  the  four  following 
days.  Stat.  Eliz.  35.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  243. 

If  any  one,  who  has  been  presented,  shall, 
after  the  first  day  of  August  and  before  the 
tenth  day  of  October,  die,  or  refuse 4  the  office,  or 

3  The  Regents  are  the  Electors. 

4  1826.    A    short    time    before    the    tenth    of    October, 
Mr.    Thackeray,    King's   College,    who   had   been   presented 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  as  one  of  the  Proctors  for  the  ensuing 
year,    resigned  on   the  ground  of  ill  health.     On  the  tenth 
of  October,   when   the    Senate   was   assembled,    one   of  the 
Bedells  read  the  40th  Stat.  Eliz.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  251.  and  part  of 
the  34th  Stat.  Eliz.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  242.   to   the  word  Electio. 
The  Heads  of  Colleges  present,  and  the  Representatives  of 
those   who  were   absent,   proceeded   to   nominate  and   prick 
two  persons  to  be  returned  to  the  Senate,  according  to  the 
form  observed  in  nominating  and  pricking  for  Vice- Chancellor. 
Mr.  Leycester  of  King's  and  Mr.  Tomkyns  of  King's  were 

returned. 


be  found  unfit  for  it,  the  Heads  of  Colleges 
shall  nominate  two  persons  to  be  offered  to  the 
Senate,  one  of  whom  they  are  bound  to  elect. 
Interpr.  Sept.  18.  1582.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  327. 

If  any  College  neglect  to  nominate  and  present 
in  due  time,  the  Heads  of  Colleges  have  a  right 
to  nominate.  Interpr.  Oct.  9-  1663.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  340. 

If  the  office,  from  any  cause  whatever,  become 
vacant  before  the  expiration  of  the  year,  Trinity 
Hall  has  the  right  of  nominating  and  present- 
ing a  Person,  who  shall  be  elected  for  the  remain- 
der of  it.  Stat.  Elh.  35.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  247. 


nomination  of  Scrutators 

By  a  Grace  passed  June  23,  1573,  (Lib.  Stat. 
p.  351.)  two  of  the  Colleges  are  to  nominate  (each 
of  them  one)  two  Non-Regents  to  be  Scrutators 
for  the  ensuing  year. 

They  are  to  be  nominated  from  the  Colleges 
above-mentioned,  in  the  order  prescribed  for  the 

returned.  The  Bedell  then  called,  ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
Procuraloris  Senioris.  The  Regents  and  Non-Regents  then 
brought  up  their  votes  in  the  usual  form,  the  Bedell  calling, 
at  intervals,  ad  Scrutinium  secundo,  &c. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  two  Senior  Doctors  present, 
stood  in  scrutiny.  Mr.  Tomkyns  was  elected  by  a  majority 
of  18  to  11  ;  and  his  Election  declared  in  the  usual  way. 

The  Junior  Proctor  was  then  elected  in  the  usual  mode  by 
the  Regents  only. 


10 

Nomination  of  Proctors;  and  by  a  decree  1663, 
(Lib.  Stat.  p.  493.)  every  College  is  to  nominate 
a  person  to  be  a  Scrutator  the  second  year  after 
its  Nomination  of  a  Proctor. 

The  Persons  nominated  are  to  be  presented 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor  in  the  presence  of  the 
Registrary. 

The  time  of  presenting  is  not  limited  by  any 
Statute. 

If  any  one,  who  has  been  presented,  shall  die, 
or  refuse  the  Office,  or  be  found  unfit  for  it,  before 
the  tenth  day  of  October,  the  Heads  of  Colleges 
shall  nominate  two  Persons  to  be  offered  to  the 
University,  one  of  whom  must  be  elected.  In- 
terpr.  1582.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  327. 

The  Heads  of  Colleges  also  nominate  in  case 
a  College  shall  neglect  to  present  any  one.  In- 
terpr.  1663.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  340. 


Certn* 

Michaelmas  Term  begins  on  the  tenth  day  of 
October. 


of  ftroctors,  *crtttator0,  #t, 

The  Election  of  Proctors  and  Scrutators  takes 
place  on  the  tenth  of  October. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine,  and  the  Senate 
assembles  at  ten  in  the  morning. 


11 

The  business  commences  by  the  Proctors  re- 
signing their  Office,  which  is  done  by  delivering 
their  books  and  keys  to  the  Vice-Chancellor. 
The  Scrutators  do  the  same  by  delivering  their 
keys. 

A  Bedell  calls  the  Houses  in  these  words: 
Magistri  Regentes  et  Non-Regentes. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  having  taken  the  chair, 
one  of  the  Bedells,  standing  on  his  left  hand, 
reads  the  Statute,  De  Electione  Procuratorum. 
Stat.  Eliz<  35.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  243. 

He  then  reads,  from  a  paper  prepared  by  the 
Registrary ; 

Nominati  et  prtesentati  ad  qfficium  Procura- 
torum in  annum  sequentem  sunt, 

Mr.  A.   Coll. 

Mr.  B.  Coll.  — 

The  Vice-Chancellor  goes  to  the  table,  and 
administers  the  following  oath  to  the  two  Senior 
Regents  present : 

Jurabitis  quod  bene  et  fideliter  accipietis  suf- 

fragia  suffragantium  in  Electione  Procuratorum. 

Sicut  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  also  administers  the  fol- 
lowing oath  to  the  two  Senior  Non-Regents 5: 

5  The  Statute  says,  "  To  two  Senior  Non- Regent  Doctors, 
or  in  their  absence,  to  two  Bachelors  in  Divinity;  or  for 
want  of  them,  to  the  two  Senior  Non-Regents  present.  Stat. 
Eliz.  36.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  248. 


12 

Jurabitis  quod  bene  etfideliter  accipietis  suf- 

Jragia  suffragantium  in   Electione  Scrutatorum. 

Sicut  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Senior  Re- 
gents who  were  sworn,  stand  in  Scrutiny  for  the 
Election  of  the  Proctors. 

A  Bedell  says,  Ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
Procuratoris  Senioris. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Senior  Re- 
gents, who  stand  in  Scrutiny,  give  their  own  votes 
first  in  writing,  in  the  following  form : 

A.  B.  digit  Magistrum  C.  D.  in  Procura- 
torem  Seniorem  hujus  Academic  in  annum  se- 
quentem. 

The  Doctors  and  Regent  Masters  bring  their 
votes  in  writing  in  the  above  form. 

A  Bedell  calls  at  proper  intervals,  Ad  Scru- 
tinium secundo ;  Ad  Scrutinium  ultimo;  and 
Cessatum  est  a  Scrutinio. 

The  two  Regents,  who  stood  in  Scrutiny  with 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  go  to  the  Proctor's  place, 
and  the  Senior  reads  the  votes  for  the  Senior 
Proctor6;  and,  having  finished  them,  he  reads 
from  a  paper,  which  he  has  prepared, 

Ego,  A.  B.  Senior  Regens  in  hac  Congrega- 
tione,  (eligo  et}  electum  a  vobis  pronuncio,  Magi- 

6  He  reads  one  vote  at  length,  and  for  each  of  the  others 
he  says,  Eundem  digit  A.  B. 


IS 


strum    C.  D.   in   Procuratorem   Seniorem   hujus 
Academics  in  annum  sequentem. 

One   of  the  Bedells  then  says ; 

Ad  Scrutinium  pro  Elections  Procurators 
Alterius. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Regents, 
who  stand  in  Scrutiny,  give  their  votes  written 
in  the  following  form : 

A.  B.  eligit  Magistrum  C.  D.  in  Procura- 
torem Alterum  hujus  Academic  in  annum  se- 
quentem. 

» 

The  Election  is  then  proceeded  in,  finished, 
and  declared,  in  the  same  manner  as  that  of  the 
Senior  Proctor. 

Whilst  the  Election  of  Proctors  is  going  on 
in  the  Regent- House,  a  Bedell  accompanies  the 
two  Non-Regents,  who  were  sworn,  to  the  Non- 
Regent  House. 

He  there  reads  the  thirty-sixth  Statute  of 
Elizabeth  (Lib.  Stat.  p.  248.),  and  afterwards  the 
following  paper,  prepared  by  the  Registrary, 

Nominati  et  prcesentati  ad  Qfficium  Scruta- 
torum  in  annum  sequentem  sunt, 

Magister  A.    Coll. 

Magister  B.   Coll.  - 

He  then  prepares  a  Scrutiny  paper  in  the 
following  form : 


14 

Magister  A.   Coll 

(  placet 

Magister  B.  Coll. j  mn  placet 

He  then  says 

Ad  Serutinium  pro  Electione  Scrutatorum. 

The  two  Senior  Non-Regents,  who  stand  in 
Scrutiny  (and  as  many  other  Non-Regents  as  chuse 
to  vote)  then  come  to  the  table,  and  mark  the 
placet  line  ;  the  Bedell  calling  at  proper  intervals, 
Ad  Serutinium  secundo,  Ad  Serutinium  ultimo, 
and  Cessatum  est  a  Scrutinio. 

After  this  the  Senior  of  the  two  Non-Regents, 
who  stood  in  Scrutiny,  declares  the  Election  in 
the  following  words: 

Magister  A.  Coll.  — —  f     7 
Magister  B.  Coll j  Placent  eis' 

On  the  fifteenth  of  March,  1825,  the  Senior 
Proctor  published  the  following  notice : 

Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius,  certior  factus  Offi- 
cium  Scrutator  is  jam  vacare  per  mortem  Magistri 
Judgson,  assignat  horam  primam  pomeridianam 
diei  Veneris  proxime  sequentis  pro  Electione  novi 
Scrutatoris. 

On  the  day  of  Election  the  Senior  Proctor 
published  the  following: 

Nominati  et  punctis  notati  in  Qfficium  Scruta- 
toris sunt9 


15 

Magister  Clark,  Coll.  Trin. 
Magister  Musgrave,  Coll.  Trin. 

A  Bedell  then  called,  ad  Scrutinium  pro  Elec- 
tione  Scrutatoris. 

The  Regents  and  Non-Regents  then  gave 
their  votes,  and  the  Election  was  declared,  in  the 
usual  manner. 

The  Proctors  and  Scrutators  being  elected,  and 
their  Election  pronounced,  the  Proctors  go  to 
the  lower  end  of  the  Senate-House,  and  put  on 
their  Congregation  habits,  which  are  their  ruffs 
and  white  hoods. 

The  Scrutators  wear  their  hoods  squared. 
They  then  go  to  the  Vice-Chancellor's  table. 

Each  of  the  Proctors  produces  a  bond7  executed 
by  the  Master,  Fellows,  and  Scholars  of  his 
College,  and  given  to  the  University  for  securing 
the  performance  of  certain  articles  mentioned  there- 
in. See  a  Grace  1790.  Lib.  Graf.  Lambda. 
p.  251. 

The  penalty  of  the  bond  for  the  Senior  Proctor, 
is  eight  hundred  pounds ;  that  for  the  Junior 
Proctor,  is  five  hundred  pounds. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  gives  the  Oaths  of  Alle- 
giance and  Supremacy  to  the  Proctors  and  Scru- 
tators. 

7  Prepared  by  the  Registrary.    * 


16 

He  then  gives  the  Oath  of  Office  to  the 
Proctors,  viz: 

Jurabitis  quod  bene  etfideliter  prastabitis  om- 
nia  qu&  spectant  ad  Qfficium  Procuratorum  hujus 
Academics :  Sic  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  ejus 
Evangelia. 

He  gives  the  following  Oath  to  the  Scrutators : 

Jurabitis  quod  bene  et  fideliter  prcestabitis 
omnia  quce  spectant  ad  Qfficium  Scrutatorum  hujus 
Academic :  Sic  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  ejus 
Evangelia. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  delivers  the  books,  and 
some  keys  to  each  of  the  Proctors,  and  a  key  of 
the  Common  Chest  to  each  of  the  Scrutators. 

They  take  their  leave  of  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
after  which  the  Proctors  go  to  their  table. 


of  I&££$*r0  &  gtttfttt0r#  of  ttyi  Common 

ant*  of  tyt 
Appointment  of 

A  Caput  is  then  called,  and  the  following 
Grace  offered  for  the  Keepers  and  Auditors  of 
the  Common  Chest,  and  of  the  University  Press 8. 

Custodes  CistcB  Communis,  et  Auditor es  ejus- 
dem  et  Qfficmce  Typographies . 

8  By  Grace  of  Oct.  10,  l6p8,  the  Auditors  of  the  Common 
Chest  are  also  to  be  Auditors  of  the  University  Press.  Lib. 
Grat.  Theta.  440. 


17 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Cistce  Communis  Custodea- 
sint,  una  cum  Domino  Pro-Cancellario  et  duobus 
Procurator ibus,  ambo  Scrutatores 9. 

Auditor es *  ejusdem  et  Officince  Typographies ; 

Magister  A.  Coll. 

Magister  B.  Coll. 

Magister  C.    Coll. 

The  two  following  Graces 2  are  also  offered 
for  the  appointment  of  the  Moderators  and  Exa- 
miners of  the  Questionists : 

For  the  Moderators : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magister  A.  Coll. ,  et 

Magister  B.  Coll. ,  constituantur  Moderatores 

in  Scholis  publicis  Sophistarum  et  Baccalaureo- 
rum ;  eaque  moderamina  in  propriis  suis  Personis 
prcestantibus,  assignentur  stipendia,  secundum  de- 
creta  Academics,  a  Qucestionistis  et  Inceptoribus 
exigenda. 

For  the  Examiners : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magister  A.  Coll. ,  et 

Magister  B.  Coll. ,  sint  Examinatores  Qute- 

stionistarum  pro  anno  jfuturo,  una  cum  Dominis 
Procurator  ibus,  atque3  anni  prcecedentis  Mode- 

9  The  two  Scrutators  of  the  year  are  usually  appointed; 
but  by  Stat.  Eliz.  39.  (Lib.  Stat.  p.  250.)  any  two  Non- 
Regents  may  be  elected. 

1  By  the   39th  Statute,  the  Auditors  may  be  any  three 
Regents  or  Non- Regents ;  but  a  Doctor  of  Divinity,  a  Regent, 
and  a  Non- Regent,  are  usually  elected. 

2  Prepared  by  the  Registrary. 

3  Or  others  appointed  according  to  the  Grace  March  20, 
1779-  Lib.  Stat.  p.  439. 

B 


18 

ratoribus ;  ita  tamen  ut  sententiam  ferant  in  vim 
juramenti  prius  Academics  prcestiti. 

Two  separate  Graces  are  offered  at  this  Con- 
gregation to  appoint  the  Moderators  of  the  year, 
deputy  Proctors  in  the  absence  of  the  Proctors. 

The  form  of  the  Graces  is  as  follows : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magister  A.  Coll. ,  sit 

Procurator  deputatus  in  absentia  Magistri  S. 

At  this  Congregation  the  Bedells  resign  their 
staves ;  the  proceedings  are  as  follow : 

One  of  the  Bedells  calls  up  the  Houses. 
The  Vice-Chancellor  takes  the  chair. 

The  Senior  Proctor  (his  Colleague  standing 
by  him)  reads  the  38th  Statute,  De  Prceconum 
sen  Viatorum  numero,  officio,  et  electione.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  249. 

The  Vice- Chancellor  and  the  Proctors  then 
go  to  the  table,  where  the  Bedells4  deliver  their 
staves  to  the  Vice-Chancellor. 

They  then  take  their  leave  and  go  to  the 
east  end  of  the  Senate-House,  whilst  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  Proctors  stand  in  Scrutiny,  to 
enquire  whether  there  be  any  complaint  against 
them. 

4  If  any  of  the  Bedells  be  prevented  from  attending  this 
Congregation,  a  Grace  is  offered  (read  in  one  Congregation 
only)  that  another  person  may  deliver  up  his  staff. 


19 


If  none  be  made,  the  Junior  Proctor  comes 
to  them,  and  they  return  with  him  to  the  table, 
where  the  Vice-Chancellor  delivers  to  them  their 
staves. 

They  pass  by  the  table,  and  bow  to  the 
Vice-Chan  cellor  and  Proctors. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  continues  the  Congre- 
gation to  one5  o'clock  in  the  afternoon  in  the 
following  words  : 


continuamus  hanc  Congregationem  Re- 
gentium  et  Non-Regentium  in  horam  primam 
pomeridianam  hujusce  diet. 

The  Proctors'  staves  are  brought  to  their  rooms 
by  the  servants  of  the  late  Proctors. 

Each  Proctor  pays  to  the  servant,  who  brings 
his  staff,  two  shillings  and  sixpence. 


Election  of 

According  to  the  decree,  by  which  the  Cycle 
of  Proctors,  now  in  use,  was  established,  the 
Colleges  are  to  present  Persons  to  be  Taxors  in 
the  year  immediately  following  that  in  which 
they  have  presented  to  the  Proctorship.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  493. 

They  may  be  chosen  either  from  the  Regents 

5  The  Bell  begins  to  ring  at  one,   the   Senate   assembles 
at  two. 

li  2 


20 

or  Non-Regents6:  Stat.  Eliz.  37-  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  248.  but  by  their  office  they  are  Regents 
during  the  year. 

They  are  to  be  presented  to  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor  by  the  Masters  of  their  Colleges,  or  by 
others  in  their  names,  before  the  first  day  of 
September  immediately  preceding  the  Election. 
Stat.  Eli*.  37.  tab.  Stat.  p.  248. 

The  presentation  must  take  place  in  the  pre- 
sence of  the  Registrary,  who  is  to  note  it. 

If  a  College,  whose  turn  it  is  to  present, 
neglect  to  do  so  before  the  first  of  September,  it 
is  subject  to  a  penalty  of  ten  pounds,  to  be  ap- 
plied to  the  use  of  the  Common  Chest.  Vid. 
Grat.  Oct.  13,  1722.  Lib.  Stat.  414. 

Graces  have  often  passed  for  excusing  this 
payment. 

If  any  one,  who  has  been  presented,  shall,  after 
the  first  day  of  September,  and  before  the  tenth 
day  of  October,  die,  or  refuse  the  Office,  or  be 
found  unfit  for  it,  the  Heads  of  Colleges  shall 
nominate  two  Persons  to  be  offered  to  the  Uni- 
versity, one  of  whom  they  must  elect.  Interp. 
Sept.  18,  1582.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  327- 

6  A  doubt  having  arisen,  whether  a  Bachelor  in  Divinity 
be  eligible  into  the  office  of  Taxor; 

"  We,  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads,  having  examined 
"  the  Statutes  de  Eligendis  Taxatoribus,  and  enquired  into  the 
"  practice  of  the  University,  are  of  opinion  that  a  Bachelor 
"  in  Divinity  is  not  eligible  into  the  office  of  Taxor."  Interpr, 
Prcefect.  July  1,  1802. 


The  Heads  of  Colleges  have  also  the  right  of 
Nomination  in  case  any  College  shall  neglect  to 
present  in  due  time.     Interpr.  Oct.  9,  1663.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  340. 

The  Regents  alone  are  the  Electors,  and  they 
are  hound  to  elect  those  presented  hy  the  Colleges, 
unless  cause  to  the  contrary  he  alledged  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  before  the  first  day  of  October, 
and  proved  to  be  sufficient,  within  four  days  after, 
before  him  and  a  majority  of  the  Heads  of  Col- 
leges. Stat.  Eliz.  37.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  248. 

In  case  the  Office,  from  whatever  cause,  be- 
come vacant  during  the  year,  Trinity  Hall  ap- 
points a  Taxor  for  the  remainder  of  it.  Stat. 
Eliz.  35.  Lib.  Stat.  247. 

The  Taxors  are  elected  in  the  afternoon  of 
the  tenth  of  October.  The  bell  begins  to  ring 
at  one  o'clock. 

A  Bedell  calls  the  Regent-House,  and  the 
Vice-Chancellor  takes  the  chair. 

The  Senior  Proctor  reads  the  37th  Statute, 
De  Electione  jEdilium  sive  Taxatorum.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  248.  and  afterwards  the  following  paper, 
prepared  by  the  Registrary : 

Nominati  et  prcesentati  ad  Qfficium  Taxa- 
torum in  annum  sequentem  sunt, 

Magister  A.    Coll. 


Magister  B.    Coll.- 


A  Bedell  says  Ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
Taxatoris  Senioris. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors  stand  in 
Scrutiny. 

The  votes  are  written  in  the  following  form : 

A.  JB.  digit  C.  D.  in  Taxatorem  Seniorem 
hujus  Academics  in  annum  sequentem. 

The  subsequent  proceedings  are  exactly  si- 
milar to  those  which  take  place  in  the  Election 
of  the  Senior  Proctor.  See  page  12. 

The  Election  is  then  pronounced  by  the  Se- 
nior Proctor  in  the  following  words : 

Ego  A.  B.  Senior  Procurator  hujus  Acade- 
mice,  (eligo  et)  electum  a  vobis  pronuncio,  C.  D. 
in  Seniorem  Taxatorem  hujus  Academics  in  an- 
num sequentem. 

The  Junior  Taxor  is  then  elected,  and  his 
Election  pronounced  in  the  same  manner. 

The  two  Persons  elected  go  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor's  table  in  white  hoods. 

They  take  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Vice-Chancellor  administers  to 
them  the  Oath  of  Office,  viz. 

Jurabitis  quod  bene  et  Jideliter  prczstabitis 
omnia  quce  spectant  ad  Qfficium  Taxatorum  hujus 
Academics.  Sic  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta 
ejus  Evangelia. 


A  Taxor  may  be  admitted  by  Proxy.  Fid. 
Graf.  10  Oct.  1632.  Lib.  Grat.  Zeta,  p.  255- 
10  Oct.  1688.  Lib.  Grat.  Theta,  p.  313. 

A  Taxor  may  appoint  a  Deputy,  subject  to 
the  approbation  of  the  Senate. 

The  Taxors'  seats  at  St.  Mary's  Church  are 
at  the  upper  end  of  the  South  side  of  the  pit, 
opposite  to  the  Proctors*  seats. 

In  strictness,  they  should  wear  their  white 
hoods  squared  at  Church. 

Their  place  in  processions,  &c.  is  next  to  that 
of  the  Proctors. 

Immediately  after  their  Election,  they  ap- 
point, each  of  them,  a  Person  to  be  Warden, 
whose  business  it  is  to  ascertain  the  price  of  wheat 
in  the  Cambridge  market. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  administers  to  the  War- 
dens the  following  Oath,  on  or  before  the  next 
market-day : 

You  swear  that  you  will  well  and  truly  execute 
the  Office  of  Wardens,  within  the  Town  and 
precincts  of  the  University  of  Cambridge,  by  de- 
livering in  the  true  price  of  wheat  in  Cambridge 
market  every  market  day. 

So  help  you  God. 

In  the  October  Term  following  their  appoint- 
ment, the  following  Grace  is  offered  to  the 
Caput : 


24 

Cum  A.  JB.  et  C.  D.  Procancellarium  vestrum 
de  annond  certiorem  reddendi  Munus  per  annum 
integrum  sustinuerint :  Placeat  Vobis,  ut  decem 
Us  libra  e  Cistd  Communi  exsolvantur. 

After  the  Taxors  have  been  elected  and  taken 
the  Oaths,  the  Graces  for  Keepers  and  Auditors 
of  the  Gommon  Chest,  and  Auditors  of  the  Press, 
together  with  the  Graces  for  the  Moderators, 
Examiners,  and  Deputy  Proctors,  are  read  a 
second  time  in  both  Houses,  and  put  to  the 
vote. 

The  Auditors  take  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance 
and  Supremacy,  and  the  Vice-Chancellor  ad- 
ministers the  following  Oath : 

Jurabitis  quod  bene  et  fideliter  accipietis  com- 
putum  Cistce  Communis,  cceteraque  omnia  prce- 
stabitis,  quce  spectant  ad  Qfficium  Auditorum. 
Sicut  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evan- 
gelia.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  529. 

The  Moderators,  as  Deputy  Proctors,  take 
the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and 
the  Vice-Chancellor  administers  to  them  the 
following  Oath : 

Jurabitis  quod  bene  et  fideliter  prcestdbitis  ea 
omnia9  ad  quce  deputati  eritis  a  Procurator ibus, 
quatenus  ad  eorum  Qfficium  spectant,  cum  ab- 
sentes  fuerint.  Sicut  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta 
Dei  Evangelia.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  529. 

If  any  other  Graces  were  read  in  the  morning, 
they  are  also  now  to  be  read  a  second  time  in 


25 

both  Houses,  and  put  to  the  vote ;  except  Graces 
for  the  degrees  of  Noblemen  and  Fellows  of 
King's,  and  Supplicats  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Arts,,  which  require  to  be  read  in  one  Con- 
gregation only. 

When  the  business  is  concluded,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  takes  the  chair,  and  dissolves  the  Con- 
gregation in  the  following  words : 

Nos  dissolvimus  hanc  Congregationem  Re- 
gentium  et  Non-Regentium, 

The  Proctors'  men  are  then  sworn  in  Con- 
stables, and  take  the  following  Oath : 

You  shall  well  and  truly  serve  our  Sovereign 
Lord  the  King,  in  the  Office  of  Constable  for 
the  University  and  Town  of  Cambridge  for  the 
year  ensuing,  according  to  the  best  of  your  skill 
and  knowledge. 

So  help  you  God. 


manner  of  Fottng  ftp  <£rac*7  10  a0 

At  the  first  Congregation  the  Grace  is  offered 
to  the  Caput. 

7  Cum  Senatus  Dignitas  Gravitasque  omnino  postulant,  ut 
nihil  nisi  deliberatum,  omniumque  judicio  perpensum,  vestra 
Autoritate  sanciatur :  at  Gratice  tamen  concessce  annis  1624- 
et  1716,  ad  hoc  assequendum  hand  satis  valuerint : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  nullce  in  posterum  concedantur  Gratice, 
prceter  eas,  quce  ad  gradus  pertineant  suscipiendos,  vel  jure 
NobiUtatis,  vel  Sociis  Collegii  Regalis,  vel  denique  Supplied- 

tionum 


26 

If  it  pass  in  the  Caput,  it  is  then  given  to 
a  Bedell,  who  takes  it  into  the  Non-Regent 
House,  and  delivers  it  to  the  Senior  Scrutator, 
by  whom  it  is  read  (his  Colleague  standing  by 
him)  to  the  Non-Regents. 

He  then  takes  it  to  the  Regent-House,  and 
delivers  it  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  who  reads 
it  to  the  Regents,  his  Colleague  standing  by 
him. 

At  the  second  Congregation,  it  is  again  read 
in  the  Non-Regent  House,  after  which  the 
Scrutators  advance  a  few  steps  from  the  table, 
and  (if  a  non  placet  be  not  given)  they  return, 
and  the  Senior  says  placet  eis. 

This  is  the  mode  of  proceeding  when  there 
is  no  opposition,  and  is  called  walking  with  a 
Grace. 

If  a  non  placet  be  given,  the  Members  of 
that  House  (all  other  Persons  leaving  it)  take 
their  seats. 


tionum  more  solenni,  ni  triduo  ad  minimum,  antequam  cor  am 
Capite  vestro  recitentur,  missce  fuerint  Schedules  rei  vobis  pro- 
ponendce  naturam  exprimentes,  et  ad  cedes  Prcefectorum  omnium, 
et  ad  eos  qui  pro  Capite  vestro  constitute  sint,  et  ad  Collegium 
unumquodque,  si  minus  quadraginta  ex  ordine  vestro  ad  suffragia 
ferenda  convenerint.  Si  quce  vero  aliter  latce  et  concessce 'fuerint, 
ece  viribus  cassce  irritceque  habeantur.  Atque  ut  vestrum  hoc 
Decretum  Statuti  vim  obtineat,  et  inlra  decem  dies  Procuratorum 
libris  inscribatur.  Senatusconsult.  Nov.  1798. 

If  forty  Members  be  present  at  the  Jirst  Congregation,  the 
usual  number  only  (25)  is  required  at  the  second. 


The  two  Scrutators,  having  prepared  a  Scrutiny 
paper  in  the  following  form, 


Placet 

Non  Placet . 


take  the  votes  of  each  Person. 

When  all  the  votes  have  been  taken,  the 
Scrutators  cast  them  up,  and  pronounce  accord- 
ingly. 

If  the  number  of  non  placets  exceed  that  of 
placets,  or  be  equal  to  it,  the  Grace  is  thrown 
out,  and  the  Scrutators  return  to  the  table,  when 
the  Senior  pronounces  non  placet. 

If  the  placets  be  more  in  number  than  the 
non  placets^  the  Senior  Scrutator  pronounces  from 
the  table  placet  eis,  and  the  Bedell  carries  the 
Grace  into  the  Regent-House,  where  it  is  read 
by  the  Senior  Proctor,  his  Colleague  standing  by 
him. 

After  it  has  been  read,  the  Senior  Proctor 
advances  a  few  steps  into  the  House,  and  the 
Junior  Proctor  walks  towards  the  Vice-Chancellor's 
chair. 

If  there  be  no  non  placet  given,  the  Proctors 
return  to  their  place,  and  the  Senior  says  placet 
eis. 

If  a  non  placet  be  given,  the  Regents  take 
their  seats,  the  Proctors  prepare  a  Scrutiny  paper 

r    (placet 

(  non  placet  .  . 


28 

and  proceed  to  take  the  votes  of  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, Noblemen,  Doctors  and  other  Regents. 

They  then  cast  them  up,  and  the  Senior 
declares  the  result  of  the  Scrutiny,  in  the  same 
manner  as  the  Senior  Scrutator  did  in  the  Non- 
Regent  House. 


Election  of  tljr  eaput. 

On  the  twelfth  of  October,  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, the  Heads  of  Colleges,  (or  their  Repre- 
sentatives 8)  Doctors  of  Divinity,  Law  and  Physic, 
the  Proctors  and  Scrutators,  meet  in  the  Senate- 
House  at  one  o'clock  in  the  afternoon.  Stat. 
Eliz.  41.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  251. 

The  bell  does  not  ring. 

The  Proctors  wear  their  hoods  squared. 

They  do  not  carry  their  books. 

8  "  Whereas  doubts  have  arisen  respecting  the  Persons, 
"  to  whom  the  right  of  Nominating  in  the  Election  of  Lec- 
"  turers  and  other  Officers  belongs,  We,  whose  names  are 
"  underwritten,  having  considered  the  words  of  the  40th 
"  Statute  "  de  Electione  Lectorum  et  Reliquorum  Officiariorum" 
"  and  also  Lord  Burleigh's  Letter  on  the  same  subject,  do 
"  declare  the  intention  and  meaning  thereof  to  be," 

"  That  no  Person  can  exercise  the  right  of  Nominating 
"  as  Representative  of  any  Head  of  a  House,  excepting 
"  the  Vice-Provost,  Vice- Master,  President,  or  Locum-tenens, 
"  regularly  appointed  according  to  the  Statutes  of  the  College 
"  to  which  he  belongs."  Inter pr.  Prcefect*  1816. 


A  Bedell  reads  part  of  the  forty-first  Statute, 
De  Capite  in  quavis  Congregatione  per  annum 
eligendo  et  de  ejus  Authoritate,  ending  with  the 
word  pertinebit. 

After  this  the  Vice-Chan cellor  writes  the 
names  of  five  Persons,  (viz.  a  Doctor  of  Divinity, 
a  Doctor  of  Laws,  a  Doctor  of  Physic,  a  Non- 
Regent  Master,  and  a  Regent9  Master)  on  a 
paper  prepared  by  the  Registrary. 

Each  of  the  Proctors  writes  also  the  names 
of  five  other  persons  ;  viz.  one  of  each  degree : 

A  Bedell  reads  from  the  Nomination  paper, 
Nominati  in  Caput  Senatus  pro  anno  sequente 


Pro  Seniore  Theologo.  . . .  Doctores 
Pro  Seniore  Jurisconsulto. . .  Doctores 
Pro  Seniore  Medico.  .  .  Doctores 


9  "  A  doubt  having  arisen  whether  a  Master  of  Arts, 
"  of  more  than  five  years  standing,  be,  under  any  circum- 
"  stances,  eligible  into  the  Caput  as  Senior  Regent : " 

"  We,  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads,  having  considered 
"  the  Statute  de  Eligendo  Capile,  are  of  opinion  and  do 
"  determine,  that  no  Master  of  Arts  of  more  than  five 
"  years  standing,  is  eligible  into  the  Caput  as  Senior  Regent." 
Decret.  Prefect  Mai.  1800. 


(K. 

Pro  Seniore  Non-Regente. . .  Magistri  <  L. 

(M. 


Pro  Seniore  Regente Magish 


Out  of  the  above  fifteen,  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
the  Heads  of  Colleges  (or  their  Representatives,) 
the  Doctors,  and  the  Scrutators  prick  (each  of 
them)  five. 

The  Proctors  do  not  prick,  unless  as  Repre- 
sentatives of  the  Masters  of  their  Colleges. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  two  Senior  Doctors 
of  Divinity  present,  stand  in  Scrutiny. 

The  Junior  of  the  company  goes  to  the  table, 
and  pricks  first ;  the  rest  follow  according  to 
their  Juniority. 

Each  Elector  is  to  prick  only  one  of  the 
Persons  nominated  for  each  Faculty. 

If  there  be  an  equality  of  votes  for  two  or 
more  of  any  Faculty,  the  Election  (after  three 
Scrutinies)  shall  belong  to  the  Vice-Chancellor 
and  the  two  Senior  Doctors  present,  or  the 
majority  of  them,  of  which  the  Vice-Chancellor 
must  be  one. 

A  Bedell  then  writes  on  the  paper: 

Nominati  et  punctis  notati  in  Caput  Senattts 
pro  anno  sequente  sunt, 


31 

Pro  Senior e  Theologo.  .....  Doctor   A. 

Pro  Seniore  Jurisconsulto. .  .  Doctor  JB. 

Pro  Seniore  Medico Doctor    C.     • 

Pro  Seniore  Non-Regente.  .  .  Magister  D. 

Pro  Seniore  Regente Magister  E. 

He  then  reads  these  names,  and  delivers 
the  paper  to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  who  gives 
it  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  to  be  published  at  the 
beginning  of  the  next  Congregation. 

Each  Member  of  the  Caput  has  a  negative 
voice.  Stat.  Eliz.  41.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  252. 

If  a  Person,  who  has  been  elected  one  of 
the  Caput,  refuse  to  take  the  Office,  before  his 
Election  has  been  declared  to  the  Senate  by  the 
Proctor,  another  shall  be  elected  according  to 
the  foregoing  form ;  but  if  his  Election  shall 
have  been  declared,  then  the  Senior  of  that 
Faculty,  to  which  he  belonged,  shall  supply 
his  place.  Interpr.  Oct.  20,  1581.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  326. 

In  case  one  of  the  Caput  die  before  the 
expiration  of  the  year,  his  place  is  in  like 
manner  supplied,  by  the  Senior  of  his  Faculty 
present,  during  the  remainder  of  the  year. 
Decret.  Prefect.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  460. 

If  any  one  of  the  Caput  for  the  year  be 
absent  from  a  Congregation,  the  Senior  of  the 
Faculty  present  shall  supply  his  place.  Stat. 
Elfa.  41.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  251. 


32 

If  there  be  no  other  of  that  Faculty  present, 
then  the  Senior  of  another  Faculty  is  to  take 
his  place.  Ibid. 

It  has  been  determined,  that  if  the  regular 
Non-Regent  be  not  present,  his  place  is  to 
be  supplied  by  the  Senior  Bachelor  of  Divinity 
present. 

In  the  case  of  Thomas  Byng,  LL.D.  who 
was  appointed  one  of  the  Caput  12  Oct.  1578, 
and  was  elected  Vice-Chancellor  on  the  fifth 
of  November  following,  it  was  determined  (by 
eight  Heads  including  the  Vice-Chan cellor)  that 
no  new  Election  should  take  place,  but  that, 
"  according  to  the  tenor  and  provision  of  the 
Statute,"  the  Senior  of  that  Faculty  present  in 
the  Schools,  or,  in  case  no  one  of  that  Faculty 
were  present,  the  next  Senior  in  other  Faculties, 
should  supply  his  place.  Decret.  Prefect.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  460. 

It  was  at  the  same  time  determined,  that  if 
a  regular  Member  of  the  Caput  were  absent  at 
the  beginning  of  the  Congregation,  and  another 
Person  had  taken  his  place,  that  if  that  Member 
of  the  Caput  should  afterwards  come  in,  he,  for 
that  time,  should  not  be  of  the  Caput,  but  his 
Deputy.  Decret.  Prefect.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  460. 

Oct.  12,  1776.  a  doubt  arose,  whether  a  Per- 
son, who  was  a  Scrutator,  could  vote  as  Repre- 
sentative of  the  Master  of  his  College,  and  again 
as  Scrutator:  it  was  determined  in  the  affir- 
mative. 


33 

Oct.  12,  1777.  A  Non-Regent  was,  by  mis- 
take, chosen  to  fill  the  situation  of  Senior  Regent. 
A  meeting  was  held  on  the  15th,  and  a  Regent 
was  chosen  in  his  stead. 

April  8,  1776.  It  was  determined  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  major  part  of  the  Heads  of 
Colleges,  that  a  Doctor  of  Law,  afterwards  created 
a  Doctor  in  Divinity,  is  eligible  into  the  Caput 
as  Jurisconsultus.  Interpr.  Stat.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  348. 

A  Master  of  Arts  of  more  than  five  years 
standing,  although  he  may  have  resumed  his 
Regency,  is  not  eligible  into  the  Caput  as  Senior 
Regent.  Decret.  Prefect.  Mai.  1800. 


appointment  of 

April  29,    1818.      The    following     Regulations 
for   the   appointment    of  Pro-Proctors    were 
read  by  the   Vice-Chancellor  to  the  Senate. 

1.  On  account  of  the  great  increase  of  Stu- 
dents in  this  University,  and  the  necessity  of  their 
lodging  in  the  Town,  it  is  expedient  to  appoint 
annually  two  Pro-Proctors,  who  shall  assist  the 
Proctors  in  the  enforcement  of  Discipline. 

2.  Bachelors  in  Divinity,  as  well  as  Masters 
of  Arts,  shall  be  eligible  to  this  Office. 

3.  They   shall   be   nominated   by  the   Vice- 
Chancellor  and  the  two  Proctors,  for  the  approba- 
tion of  the   Senate. 

C 


4.  Each   Pro-Proctor   shall   be   allowed  one 
man,  who  must  be  sworn  as  a  Constable. 

5.  The   annual    salary   of  each   Pro-Proctor 
shall  be  forty  pounds. 

6.  The  annual  salary  of  each  Pro-Proctor's 
man  shall  be  twelve  pounds. 

7.  The  expences  of  this  Institution  shall  be 
defrayed  from  the  University  Chest. 

The  time  of  Election  shall  be  on  the  first 
Congregation l  after  the  Election  of  Proctors. 

The  following  Grace  was  then  offered  to  the 
Senate,  and  passed: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  duo  Viri  singulis  annis  a 

Senatu  eligantur,  qui  Vice-Procuratorum  Qfficio 

fungantur,  et  ut  Ordinationes  de  hac  Institutione 

modo  lectce  vestra   Auctoritate  rates  sint,   et  in 

Procuratorum  libris  inscribantur. 

At  the  first  Congregation,  which  takes  place 
after  the  Election  of  Proctors,  the  Senior  Proctor 
publishes  the  following: 

Nominati  in  Pro-Procuratores  anni  sequentis 
sunt, 

Magister  A.  Coll. 

Magister  B.  Coll. 

C.D.    Pro-Can. 
E.  F.   Proc.  Sen. 
G.  H.  Proc.  Jun. 

1  If  the  Election  takes  place  on  any  other  day,  three  days' 
notice  must  be  given. 


35 

The  following  Grace  is  then  proposed : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magister  A.  et  Magister 
B.  sint  Pro-Procuratores  in  annum  sequentem. 

Assistant  Proctors  have  been  occasionally  ap- 
pointed by  a  Grace  similar  to  the  following : 

Mart.  %1,  1810.  Placeat  Vobis,  ut  in  rebus 
omnibus,  quce  ad  pacem  vel  bonos  mores,  turn  in 
Academia  turn  in  Oppido,  pertineant  tuendos, 
Magistro  Geo.  Fred.  Tavel,  Magistro  Geo. 
Barnes,  Magistro  Benedicto  Chapman,  Magis- 
tro Roberto  Pedder  Buddicom,  concedatur  po- 
testas  Procuratoria,  iisdemque  Qfficio  suo  rite 
fungentibus,  si  qua  Us  intendatur,  ceque  ac  Pro- 
curatoribus  ipsis,  Universitatis  sumptibus  defen- 
datur. 

On  occasion  of  their  Royal  Highnesses  the 
Chancellor  and  the  Duchess  of  Gloucester,  and 
Princess  Sophia  of  Gloucester,  visiting  the  Uni- 
versity, the  following  Grace  was  passed : 

Jul.  3,  1819.  Placeat  F^obis,  ut  Magistris 
infra  nominatis  plena  concedatur  potestas  Pro- 
curatoria, ab  hoc  die  usque  ad  ultimum  hujus 
termini  diem,  tarn  in  Senatu  quam  extra  Senatum, 
si  opus  fuerit,  exercenda,  iisdemque  per  omnia 
obedientiam  prcestare  teneantur  Scholastici  ipsis 
Procuratoribus  debitam. 

Coll.  Regal.  .  .  .  Magister  Vince. 

Coll  Trin.         j  Magister  Judgson. 
\  Magister  Evans. 

c  2 


36 

(  Magister  Walker. 

Coll.  Jon \  ,  _     .        Tr_7 .     7 

{Magister  Whittaker. 

Aul.  Pemb.  .  .  .  Magister  French. 
Coll.  Corp.  Chr.  Magister  Shelford. 

Coll.  Cai Magister  Standly. 

Coll.  Jes Magister  Dickes. 

Coll.  Magd. .  .  .  Magister  Crawley. 

Appointment  of  Nutritional  (Examiners  of  ttjc 


The  Election  shall  take  place  at  the  first  * 
Congregation  after  the  tenth  of  October. 

The  Examiners  shall  he  nominated  by  Colleges 
according  to  the  Cycle  of  Proctors. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  names  : 

Nominati  in  Examinatores  Qucestionistarum 
anni  proxime  sequentis,  secundum  tenorem  Gra- 
tice  vicesimo  octavo  die  Maii9  anno  millesimo 
octingentesimo  vicesimo  secundo,  concesste,  sunt 

Magister  A.  Coll.  • 
Magister  B.  Coll. 

The  following  Grace  is  then  brought  in: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magister  A.  Coll.  , 
et  Magister  B.  Coll.  ,  sint  Examinatores 

2  If  at  any  Other  Congregation,  three  days'  notice  must 
be  given. 


37 

Qutestionistarum  anni  proxime  sequentis,  secun- 
dum  tenorem  Gratia  vicesimo  octavo  die  Maii 
concessce. 


Bppotnttncnt    of   <J?xamtncr<>  to   ron&urt   ttjr 

Clascal  Examination  after  atrmi**ion 

atr  lifopondcntmm   Qurottont. 

The    Election   is  to  take   place   at   the  first3 
Congregation  after  the  tenth  of  October. 

The   Examiners   are   nominated   by  Colleges, 
according  to  the  Cycle  of  Proctors  and  Taxors. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  names : 

Nominati  in   Examinatores   Determinatorum 
anni  proxime  sequentis,  sunt 

Magister  A.  Coll. 

Magister  B.  Coll. 

Magister  C.  Coll. 

Magister  D.  Coll. 

The  following  Grace  is  then  brought  in  : 

Placeat    Vobis^   ut  Magister   A.   Coll. , 

Magister  B.  Coll. ,  Magister  C.  Coll. , 

et  Magister  D.  ColL constituantur  Exami- 
natores Determinatorum  anni  proxime  sequentis 
secundum  Gratiam  vicesimo  octavo  die  Maii 
concessam. 

3  If  at  any  other  Congregation,  three  days    notice  must 
be  given. 


Hppotnttnrnt  of  Examinm   to   conduct  tfje 
Examination   of  ttjt   junior 
in  tfr*  ilent 


The  Election  is  to  take  place  at  the  first4 
Congregation  after  the  tenth  of  October. 

The  Examiners  are  nominated  by  Colleges 
according  to  the  Cycle  of  Proctors  and  Taxors. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  names  : 

Nominati  in  Examinatores  Sophistarum  Ju- 
niorum  in  termino  Quadragesimali  sunt, 

Magister  E.  Coll.  - 
Magister  F.  Coll.  - 
Magister  G.  Coll.  - 
Magister  H.  Coll.  - 

The  following  Grace  is  then  brought  in  : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magister  E.  Coll.  -  , 
Magister  F.  Coll.  --  ,  Magister  G.  Coll.  -  , 
Magister  H.  Coll.  -  ,  constituantur  Exami- 
natores Sophistarum  Juniorum  in  termino  Qua- 
dragesimali anni  proxime  sequentis,  secundum 
Ordinationes  Gratice,  decimo  tertio  die  Martii, 
anno  millesimo  octingentesimo  vicesimo  secundo, 
concessce. 


4  If  at  any  other  Congregation,  three  days'  notice  must 
be  given. 


39 


/ilagua 

Magna  Congregatio,  commonly  called  the 
Black  Assembly,  is  always  upon  the  Friday 
immediately  preceding  the  Feast  of  St.  Simon 
and  St.  Jude. 

It  is  held  in  the  Chancel  of  St.  Mary's 
Church. 

The  Vice -Chancellor  gives  notice  to  the 
Mayor,  three  days  before  the  time  of  meeting, 
to  bring  with  him  two  Aldermen,  four  Burgesses, 
and  two  Inhabitants  of  every  Parish,  to  be 
sworn. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  is  in  his  cope,  the 
Proctors  are  in  Congregation  habit,  and  have 
their  books. 

They  assemble  at  ten  o'clock ;  the  bell  begins 
to  ring  at  nine. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  sits  at  the  upper  end 
of  the  Chancel ;  the  Proctors  on  the  North 
side;  the  Mayor  and  Aldermen  on  the  South 
side. 

Two  Persons  of  every  Parish  are  called  by 
the  Town-Clerk,  and  the  Registrary  writes  down 
the  names  of  those  who  appear. 

The  Senior  Proctor  administers  the  following 
Oaths  to  the  Aldermen,  the  Burgesses,  and  the 
Parishioners. 


40 


The  Aldermens'  Oath. 

You  shall  swear  that  you  shall  diligently 
assist,  and  faithfully  counsel,  the  Mayor  and 
Bailiffs  of  the  Town  of  Cambridge,  for  peace 
both  of  the  University  and  the  Town  to  be 
kept,  and  to  search  evil  doers,  and  troublers 
of  peace,  and  vagabonds  of  the  night,  and  re- 
ceivers of  thieves  and  evil  doers.  All  this  you 
and  every  of  you  shall  promise  to  do  faithfully. 

So  help  you  God  in  Jesus  Christ. 


The  Oath  for  the  Four  Burgesses. 

You  shall  swear  to  observe  fidelity  towards 
our  Sovereign  Lord  the  King's  Majesty,  and 
to  be  assisting  and  counselling  to  his  Majesty's 
Mayor  and  Bailiffs  of  Cambridge,  and  for  the 
searching  out  of  malefactors  and  perturbers 
of  his  said  Majesty's  peace,  and  vagabonds  in 
the  night,  and  receivers  of  thieves  and  male- 
factors.  All  which  things  you  shall  diligently 
observe. 

So  help  you  God  through  Jesus  Christ. 


The  Oath  of  Two  of  every  Parish. 

You   shall    swear,   every  fortnight   to  make 
diligent  and  faithful   search  for   all    suspected ' 
Persons  lying  within  your  Parish,  and  to  present 


41 

every  such,  so  tarrying  for  three  nights,  to   the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  the  Mayor. 

So  help  you  God  in  Jesus  Christ. 
Lib.  Stat.  pp.  539,  540. 

Of  late  years  the  words  "  if  called  upon " 
have  heen  introduced  into  the  Oaths,  after  the 
words  "  You  shall  swear." 


{Proclaiming 

The  Proclamation  of  the  Markets  is  on  the 
second  Saturday  after  the  tenth  of  October. 

The  Proctors  give  notice  of  it,  a  few  days 
before  the  day  of  proclaiming,  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  the  Heads  of  Colleges,  the  Doctors, 
the  Commissary,  the  Taxors,  and  the  Registrary. 

The  whole  company  meet  at  the  Senate-House, 
at  eleven  o'clock. 

The  Proctors  come  with  their  hoods  squared, 
attended  by  their  servants. 

The  School-keeper  provides  wine  and  cakes, 
by  order  of  the  Proctors. 

After  staying  a  short  time,  they  go  to  the 
two  Markets  (first  Peas  Hill)  where  the  Pro- 
clamation is  read  by  the  Registrary,  and  repeated 
by  the  Yeoman  Bedell. 

During  the  reading  of  the  Proclamation, 
the  company  sit  in  one  of  the  adjacent  houses. 


^Junior  proctor'*  &p**c!i  in  tfje 

On  the  day  upon  which  the  first  Act  in  the 
October  Term  is  kept  in  the  Sophs'  School,  the 
Junior  Proctor  makes  a  speech. 


Commemoration  of  JSrurfactor* 

On  the  Sunday  immediately  preceding  the 
third  of  November,  there  is  a  Commemoration 
of  Benefactors,  in  the  morning,  at  St.  Mary's 
Church. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  appoints  the  Preacher, 
who  reads  the  Commemoration,  immediately  after 
the  Sermon,  from  a  book  provided  by  the  Uni- 
versity. 

An  Anthem  is  then  sung,  and  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor finishes  the  service. 

The  Doctors  attend  in  their  Scarlet  robes  in 
the  morning,  but  not  in  the  afternoon. 


Facancg  of  tfie 

On  the  third  of  November  there  is  a  Con- 
gregation ex  Statute. 

The  Vice-Chancellor's  Office  is  vacant  at 
eight  o'clock  in  the  morning.  Stat.  Elm.  34. 
Lib.  Stat.y.  242. 


The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  eight  o'clock; 
soon  after  which  the  Vice-Chancellor  comes  to 
the  Senate- House. 

A  Bedell  calls  up  the  Houses  in  the  following 
words,  Magistri  Regentes  et  Non-Regentes9  and 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  going  to  the  back  of  the 
chair,  makes  his  speech. 

The  Proctors,  preceded  by  the  Bedells,  come 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor's  place  at  the  West  end 
of  the  Senate-House. 

After  staying  there  a  short  time,  they  go  to 
the  table,  and  the  late  Vice-Chancellor  delivers 
to  them  the  books,  seals,  keys,  purse,  and  plate. 
Two  Regents  are  appointed  to  seal  the  purse, 
and  the  following  Grace  (which  is  not  offered  to 
the  Caput)  is  read  by  the  Senior  Regent  present, 
in  the  Regent-House  only : 

Placeat  Vobis  ut  sigilla  et  claves  muneris 
Procancellariatus,  sigillentur  sigillis  Magistri  A. 
et  Magistri  B. 

The  two  Regents  put  the  seals  and  keys  into 
the  purse,  and  seal  it  with  their  own  seals. 

The  Senior  Proctor  takes  the  purse  into  his 
possession,  and  desires  the  two  Regents  to  be  at 
the  next  Congregation,  to  see  that  the  seals  have 
not  been  broken. 

The  Proctors  then  seat  themselves  on  a  bench 
placed  near  the  Vice-Chancellor's  chair,  and  the 
Senior  says, 


44 

Nos  dissolvimus  hanc  Congregationem  Re- 
gentium  et  Non-Regentium. 

The  Bedells  precede  the  Proctors  into  the 
Non-Regent  House,  where  they  stay  until  the 
Heads  and  Presidents  4  have  nominated  and 
pricked  for  Vice-Chancellor. 


jJlomtniitum  an*  iprittttitg  for 

At  nine  o'clock  the  same  morning,  the  Heads5 
of  Colleges,  or  (in  the  ahsence  of  any  of  them) 
their  Representatives,  meet  in  the  Regent-House 

5  By  a  Grace  of  the  Senate,  dated  June  11,  1580,  all 
Doctors  in  the  three  Faculties  are  authorized  to  vote  in  the 
Nomination  of  Vice-  Chancellors,  &c. 

Ut  omnis  dissensionis  materia,  tarn  in  illis  viris  punctim  no- 
tandis,  qui  in  annuo  Procancellariatus  munere  vacantis  Compe- 
titores  sunt  futuri,  quam  in  Electionibus  Lectorum,  omnino 
deinceps  tollaturt 

Placet  Vobis,  ut  omnes  Doctores  cujuscunque  Facultatis  in 
Academia  commorantes,  licet  Collegiis  non  prceficiantur,  una 
cum  Collegiorum  Prcepositis,  aut  eorum  vices  gerentibus,  tertio 
Novembris  quotannis,  viz.  hora  nona  antemeridiana  ejusdem  diet 
in  Domo  Regentium  conveniant,  utque  eorum  singuli  ibidem, 
juxta  Senioritatem  suam,  unum  aliquem  ad  Procancellariatus 
Officium  nominent,  e  quorum  numero  iidem  Doctores  sigillatim 
cum  Collegiorum  Prcepositis  aut  eorum  vices  gerentibus  duos 
punctis  suis  assignent,  quorum  unus  a  Senatu  in  Procancellarium 
est  eligendus. 

Prceterea  placet  Vobis,  ut  omnes  Doctores,  una  cum  Colle- 
giorum Prcepositis  aut  eorum  vices  gerentibus,  convocentur  et 
conveniant,  quotiescunque  occasio  oblata  fuerit,  ut  suffragia  sua 
punctim  cum  Collegiorum  Preefectis  (more  in  Procancellarii 

Elections 


45 


to  nominate  and  prick  two  Persons,  one  of  whom 
is  to  be  elected  Vice-Chancellor  by  the  Senate. 
Stat.  34  .Lib.  Stat.  p.  242. 

A  Bedell  reads  as  much  of  the  34th  Statute 
as  relates  to  the  Nomination  of  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, viz.  to  the  word  Electio. 

He  produces  a  paper,  on  which  he  has  written, 

Nominati  ad  Qfficium  Pro-Cancellarii  hujus 
Academics  in  annum  sequentem  sunt, 

The  Senior  Doctor  in  Divinity  writes  on  this 
paper  the  name  of  one,  whom  he  thinks  fit  to  be 
Vice-Ch  ancellor  . 

The  next  Doctor  in  Seniority  writes  another 
name. 

The  rest  of  the  Company  write,  each  of  them 
in  his  order  of  Seniority,  other  names,  unless 
they  approve  the  Persons  already  nominated. 

The  Bedell  draws  lines  opposite  to  all  the 
names  written,  and  publishes  : 

Nominati  ad  Qfficium  Pro-Cancellarii  hujus 
Academics  in  annum  sequentem  sunt9 

Doctor  vel  Magister  A.  - 
Doctor  vel  Magister  B.  - 
Doctor  vel  Magister  C.  - 


Electione  prcescripto)  in  omnibus  Electionibus  Lectorum  et  reli- 
quorum  Academics  Officiariorum,  atque  ut  hcec  vestra  Concessio 
sen  Ordinatio  pro  Statute  habeatur,  atque  infra  decem  dies 
proximo*  in  Libris  Procuratorum  describatur.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  354-. 


46 

All  but  the  three  Seniors,  who  are  to  stand 
in  Scrutiny,  go  from  the  table. 

The  Junior  of  the  Company  goes  to  the  Scru- 
tators, and  pricks  two  of  the  names. 

The  rest  mark  according  to  their  Juniority. 
The  three  Scrutators  mark  last. 

If  several  Candidates  be  nominated,  and,  after 
three  Scrutinies,  there  should  be  an  equality  of 
votes  for  two  or  more  Persons,  the  Regius  Pro- 
fessor 6  in  Divinity  determines  which  of  them  are 
to  be  returned  to  the  Senate.  Stat.  34.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  242. 

The  Scrutators  deliver  the  paper  to  a  Bedell, 
who  writes  the  following  form,  and  publishes  the 
names  of  the  two  who  have  the  greatest  number 
of  votes : 

Nominati  et  punctis  notati  ad  Qfficium  Pro- 
Cancellarii  hujus  Academics  in  annum  sequentem 
sunt, 

Doctor  vel  Magister  A. 

Doctor  vel  Magister  B. 

6  Nov.  3,  1734.  Nominati  et  punctis  notati  ad  Qfficium 
Procancellarii  hujus  Academics  in  annum  sequentem  sunt, 

Doctor  Towers. 
Doctor  Long. 
Doctor  Adams. 

Ego,  Eichardus  Bentley,  Regius  Theologies  Professor,  con- 
sentio  ut  Doctor  Towers  et  Doctor  Adams  proponantur  Acade- 
mice  Candidati  Procancellariatus  in  annum  sequentem. 

Prcesente  me,  Lane.  Newton,  Not.  Pub.  et  Acad.  Regist. 


47 


The  Proctors  come  into  the  Regent-House 
attended  by  the  Bedells,  and  the  Senior  Doctor 
delivers  the  Nomination  paper  to  the  Senior 
Proctor,  to  be  published  at  the  beginning  of 
the  next  Congregation. 

The  Proctors  give  orders  to  the  Bell-ringer7 
concerning  ringing  the  bell  for  the  next  Con- 
gregation, which  must  be  at  nine  o'clock,  or  one 
o'clock,  on  the  following  day. 

If  the  Proctors  do  not  order  a  Congregation 
to  be  at  one  of  these  hours  on  the  fourth  of 
November,  the  Bedells  are,  by  their  own  autho- 
rity, to  order  one  to  be  at  nine  o'clock,  or  one 
o'clock,  on  the  fifth  of  November.  Stat.  Eliz.  34. 
Lib.  Stat.  p. 


The  Proctors,  preceded  by  the  Bedells,  go 
to  the  Senior  Proctor's  rooms,  where  the  staves 
are  left. 

The  Marshall  brings  the  Vice-Chancellor's 
books,  and  the  plate  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  in 
whose  custody  they  are  to  remain,  until  the 
Election  of  a  new  Vice-Chancellor. 


7  By  the  34th  Statute  the  Bedells  are,  at  the  desire  of 
the  Proctors,  to  call  a  Congregation  at  nine  in  the  morning, 
or  at  one  in  the  afternoon,  of  the  following  day.  But 
the  custom  of  calling  Congregations  by  the  Bedells  being 
discontinued,  the  Proctors  give  orders  to  the  Bell-ringer 
concerning  the  time  of  ringing  the  bell :  which  rings  one 
hour  before  the  Congregation  assembles. 


48 


Election  of  flje 

The  Senate  assembles  at  ten  in  the  morning, 
or  two  in  the  afternoon,  of  the  fourth  of  Novem- 
ber. 

It  usually  meets  at  two  in  the  afternoon. 

The  Proctors  in  Congregation  habit,  attended 
by  the  Bedells,  go  from  the  Senior  Proctor's 
rooms  to  the  Senate-House. 

They  sit  at  the  West  end  of  the  House,  and 
when  the  Congregation  is  assembled,  a  Bedell 
calls  up  the  Houses. 

The  Proctors  go  to  the  back  of  the  chair,  and 
the  Senior  publishes  the  Nominati,  fyc.  and  makes 
his  speech. 

The  Proctors  sit  upon  a  form  placed  near 
the  chair,  whilst  a  Bedell,  beginning  at  the 
word  Electio,  reads  to  the  end  of  the  34th  Statute. 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  242. 

The  Proctors  go  to  the  table,  and  stand  in 
Scrutiny  with  the  two  Senior  Doctors,  or  (if 
there  be  no  Doctor  present,)  with  the  two 
Senior  Bachelors  in  Divinity. 

The  Doctors  in  the  three  Faculties,  and 
all  the  Regent  and  Non-Regent  Masters,  are 
the  Electors. 

A  Bedell  calls,  Ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
Procancellarii. 


49 

The  Scrutators  first  give  their  votes,  written 
in  the  following  form : 

,.   >jt  fDignissimum  vel)  rr.        „  -^ 
A.  B.  digit  \      *         7.7          \  VirumC.D. 
(     Veneramlem     ) 

in  Procancellarium  hujus  Academice  in   annum 
sequentem. 

The  Doctors,  Regents,  and  Non-Regents, 
deliver  their  votes,  written  in  the  same  form, 
to  the  Scrutators. 

A  Bedell  calls  at  proper  intervals,  Ad  Scru- 
tinium  secundo — Ad  Scrutinium  ultimo — Ces- 
satum  est  a  Scrutinio. 

The  Senior  Proctor  writes  his  vote,  and 
declaration  of  Election,  in  the  following  form: 

Ego  A.  B.  Senior  Procurator  hujus  Aca- 
demice (eligo  et)  a  vobis  electum  pronuncio 

( Dignissimum  vel }    rr.  .     y,  r, 

\     rr         -L  -j         (   Virum   C.  D.   in  Procancel- 

(     renerabuem    ) 

larium  hujus  Academic  in  annum  sequentem. 

He  takes  the  votes  of  the  other  Electors,  and 
his  own  paper  to  his  place,  where  (the  Junior 
Proctor  standing  by  him)  he  reads  one  vote  at 
length,  and  for  each  of  the  rest  he  says  Eundem 
eligit  A.  B. 

Lastly,  he  pronounces  the  Election  in  the 
form  previously  written. 

D 


of  tfte 

Immediately  after  the  Election,  a  Bedell 
goes  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  Elect  to  inform  him, 
who  either  sends  word  that  he  desires  the  Con- 
gregation to  be  continued  to  some  other  day9, 

8  If  he   vote  for  the   unsuccessful   Candidate,   he   omits 
the  words  eligo  et. 

9  If  the  Vice-Chancellor  Elect  do  not  come  to  take  upon 
himself  the   Office   immediately,   the   Proctors   continue  the 

Congregation 


50 

If  there  be  a  contest  for  the  Office,  the 
Scrutators  count  the  votes,  and  give  the  lesser 
number  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  who,  (with  the 
Junior  Proctor  standing  by  him)  publishes  them 

at  the  usual  place. 

. 

He  then  reads,  in  the  same  manner,  the  votes 
for  the  Person  chosen,  and  then  declares  the 
Election  in  the  words8  of  the  paper  previously 
prepared. 

If  the  fourth  of  November  fall  on  a  Sunday, 
the  Election  is  not  deferred  on  that  account. 

If  the  Vice-Chancellor  be  not  admitted  before 
the  Sermon,  the  Proctors,  preceded  by  the 
Bedells,  go  to  St.  Mary's  Church,  with  their 
hoods  squared,  and  sit  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's 
seat. 

They  do  the  same  on  every  Sunday,  during 
the  time  the  Office  of  Vice-Chancellor  may  happen 
to  be  vacant. 


51 


or  he  accompanies  the  Bedell  to  the  Senate- 
House,  attended  by  the  Fellows  and  other 
Masters  of  Arts  of  his  College. 

He  robes  at  the  entrance  of  the  Senate- 
House,  and  the  Bedell  attends  him  to  his 
place. 

After  sitting  there  a  little  time  he  goes  to 
the  South  side  of  the  table,  the  Proctors  stand- 
ing in  front. 

He  declares,  by  his  subscription  in  the  Vice- 
Chancellor's  book,  that  he  will  conform  to  the 
Liturgy  of  the  Church  of  England,  as  by  law 
established;  then  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance 
and  Supremacy :  and  the  Senior  Proctor  ad- 
ministers to  him  the  Oath  of  Office  in  the 
following  words : 

Jurabis  quod  bene  et  fideliter  prcestdbis 
omnia  quce  spectant  ad  Qfficium  Procancellarii 
hujus  Academice ;  Sic  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta 
ejus  Evangelia.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  528. 

He  then  goes  to  the  front  of  the  table,  and 
the  Proctors  stand  on  each  side. 

The  two  Regents,  who  sealed  the  purse, 
come  and  examine  their  seals,  which  are  then 
broken,  and  the  Proctors  deliver  to  the  Vice- 
Congregation  to  the  day  and  hour  fixed  on  by  him  for 
his  Admission ;  the  Senior  Proctor  making  use  of  the  following 
form. 

Nos  continuamus  hanc  Congregationem  Regentium  et  Non- 

Regentium  in  horam diet 

D  2 


52 

Chancellor    the   seals    and    keys,    together    with 
the  plate  and  books  belonging  to  him. 

The  Proctors  then  take  their  leave,  and 
go  to  their  table,  and  the  Vice -Chancellor 
takes  the  chair  at  the  upper  end  of  the  Senate- 
House. 

After  sitting  there  a  little  time,  he  directs 
one  of  the  Bedells  to  call  up  the  Houses. 

He  then  goes  to  the  back  of  the  lower  chair, 
and  delivers  his  speech. 

Soon  afterwards,  sitting  in  the  chair,  he  dis- 
solves1 the  Congregation  in  these  words: 

Nos  dissolvimus  hanc  Congregationem  Re- 
gentium  et  Non-Regentium. 

The  Noblemen,  Doctors,  Officers,  and  other 
Members  of  the  Senate,  who  accept  the  invita- 
tion, attend  the  Vice-Chan cellor  to  his  Lodge, 
where  he  entertains  them  in  three  rooms ;  the 
Heads  and  Noblemen  in  one  room ;  the  Doctors, 
Professors,  and  University  Officers  in  another ; 
and  the  rest  of  the  company  in  a  third. 

He  informs  the  Chancellor  of  his  Election. 

By  a  power  of  Attorney,  under  his  hand  and 
seal,  he  appoints  several  of  the  Heads  of  Colleges 
therein  named,  to  act  as  his  Deputies,  in  his 
absence  or  sickness,  &c. 

He  is  to  qualify  for  his  Office. 
1  No  other  business  is  ever  transacted  on  this  clay. 


53 

He  takes  out  his  dedimus  as  a  Justice  of 
peace,  soon  after  his  admission. 

Nov.  5,  1632.  A  Proxy  was  appointed  to 
be  admitted  Vice-Chancellor  for  Dr.  Lany,  Lib. 
Grat.  Zeta,  p.  259. 

See  an  appointment  of  a  Proxy  by  Dr.  Maple- 
toft,  28  Nov.  1671.  Lib.  Grat.  Theta,  p.  57. 

A  Person  being  made  Vice-Chancellor  for 
the  remainder  of  the  year,  appointed  a  Proxy 
to  be  admitted  in  his  stead.  20  March,  1661. 
Lib.  Grat.  Eta,  p.  266. 

Nov.  8,  1558.  A  Grace  passed  for  admitting 
a  Vice-Chancellor  at  his  own  house :  (Lib.  Grat. 
Delta,  fol.  51.  b.}  But  Nov.  4,  1792,  Dr.  Milner 
was  admitted  at  his  Lodge,  without  a  Grace 
for  that  purpose.  The  Senior  Proctor  adjourned 
the  Congregation,  ad  Domicilium  Prcesidentis 
Collegii  Reginalis. 

Nov.  4,  1826.  The  Vice-Chancellor  Elect, 
Dr.  Wordsworth,  was  (on  account  of  his  health) 
admitted  at  Trinity  Lodge. 

On  that  occasion  he  did  not  make  a  speech. 

See  a  Grace  for  the  admission  of  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  to  the  degree  of  D.D.  by  another 
Person:  July  29,  1749.  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa, 
p.  115. 

See  a  Grace  for  the  admission  of  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  to  the  degree  of  B.D.  by  a  Doctor 


54 

in  Divinity,  June  12,  1764  (Kappa,  p.  397.)  5 
and  another  for  his  Admission  to  the  degree  of 
D.D.  Oct.  10,  1764.  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa,  p.  400. 

Proceedings  in  cases  where  the  Persons  elected 
into  the  Office  of  Vice-Chancellor  have  de- 
clined to  serve. 

Nov.  3,  1777-  The  Persons  nominated  by  the 
Heads  and  Presidents  for  Vice-Chancellor  were 
Dr.  Thomas,  Dr.  Plumptre,  Dr.  Farmer,  and 
Dr.  Smith.  Dr.  Thomas  and  Dr.  Plumptre  were 
returned  to  the  Senate. 

Nov.  4.  On  casting  up  the  votes,  the  num- 
bers were  for 

Dr.  Thomas 40. 

Dr.  Plumptre 16. 

Mr.  Beverley 2  went  immediately  to  Christ  Col- 
lege to  inform  Dr.  Thomas  that  he  had  been 
elected.  He  shortly  returned  and  delivered  Dr. 
Thomas's  answer  in  the  following  words,  or  in 
words  to  the  same  effect :  "  That  he  (Dr.  T.) 
had  laid  the  state  of  his  health  before  the  Uni- 
versity, and  that  he  could  not  (or  should  not) 
send  any  answer  to  the  information  brought  him." 
After  much  deliberation  the  Proctors  determined 
to  continue  the  Congregation  till  the  following 
afternoon. 

Nov.  5.  When  the  Congregation  was  as- 
sembled, a  Bedell  called  up  the  Houses,  and  the 

2  One  of  the  Esquire  Bedells. 


55 


Senior  Proctor  read  to  them  the  contents  of  a 
paper  he  had  received  from  Dr.  Thomas,  in  which 
he  resigned  all  claim,  right,  or  title  to  the  Office 
of  Vice-Chancellor.  After  some  consultation  the 
Senior  Proctor  continued  the  Congregation  to  the 
afternoon  of  the  following  Friday. 

Nov.  7.  It  appearing  from  the  Grace-book 
that  a  Grace  had  been  read  in  the  Caput  (Nov. 
29,  1671.)  when  the  Vice-Chancellor  was  not 
present^  the  following  Grace  was  offered  by 
Mr.  Whisson3  to  the  Caput,  and  afterwards  read 
in  both  Houses. 

Cum  Venerabilis  Vir  Hugo  Thomas,  S.  T.  P. 
a  vobis  nuper  electus  fuit  in  Munus  Procan- 
cellarii,  atque  idem  propter  infirmam  valetudinem, 
de  jure  suo  istius  Muneris  ex  Electione  vestrd 
obeundi,  solenni  forma  decesserit, 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  istius  Magistrates  gerendi 
immunitatem  obtineat,  et  alius  in  eundem  consueto 
more  eligatur ;  ita  tamen  ut  dictus  Dr.  Thomas 
prius  Academics  persolvat  centum  Libras  Cistce 
Communi  applicandas. 

The  Congregation  was  then  continued  to  the 
following  morning. 

Nov.  8.  The  Grace  offered  by  Mr.  Whisson 
was  read  a  second  time  in  both  Houses.  In  the 
Non-Regent  House  17  voted  for  the  Grace,  and 
7  against  it.  In  the  Regent  House  there  ap- 
peared 20  for  it,  and  21  against  it.  It  was  con- 

3  One  of  the  Seniors  of  Trinity. 


56 

sequently  lost,  and  the  Senior  Proctor  dissolved 
the  Congregation. 

Dec.  2.  This  morning,  as  soon  as  a  Congre- 
gation was  assembled,  a  Bedell  summoned  the 
two  Houses.  The  Senior  Proctor  came  to 
the  back  of  the  chair,  and  communicated  the 
contents  of  a  paper  he  had  received  from  Dr. 
Thomas.  In  this  he  stated  that  his  age,  and  his 
infirmities,  had  rendered  him  wholly  unfit  for  the 
high  Office,  to  which  he  had  been  elected ;  and 
quite  incapable  of  discharging  its  important  duties, 
either  with  advantage  to  the  University,  or  with 
satisfaction  to  himself.  He  concluded,  by  begging 
the  Senate  to  approve  the  reasons  he  had  given 
for  not  accepting  the  Office  of  Vice-Chancellor. 

The  Senior  Proctor  then  requested  the  Mem- 
bers of  the  Senate  to  express  their  approbation  or 
disapprobation  in  the  following  terms : 

A.  B.  comprobat  vel  non  comprdbat  excusa- 
tionem  a  Reverendo  Doctore  Thomas  allatam. 

The  two  Senior  Doctors  stood  in  Scrutiny 
with  the  Proctors,  and  on  counting  the  votes  there 
appeared  62  for  admitting  the  excuse,  and  13 
against  it. 

The  Heads  and  Presidents  immediately  pro- 
ceeded to  nominate  and  prick  two  Persons  as 
Candidates  for  the  Office  of  Vice-Chancellor. 
Dr.  Plumptre  and  Dr.  Goddard  were  returned 
to  the  Senate. 

Dec.  3.  Dr.  Plumptre  was  elected  Vice- 
Chancellor  in  the  usual  manner. 


57 


Nov,  4,  1786.  Sir  James  Marriott  was  this 
day  elected  Vice-Chancellor,  but  as  he  was  absent 
from  the  University,  the  Senior  Proctor  continued 
the  Congregation  to  the  9th  of  November. 

Nov.  9-  When  the  Senate  was  assembled,  a 
Bedell  called  the  two  Houses,  and  the  Senior 
Proctor  read  a  letter  from  Sir  James  Marriott, 
in  which  he  claimed  the  privilege  of  exemption 
from  serving  any  Office,  he  being  one  of  His 
Majesty's  Judges4. 

Mr.  Whitmore 5  then  read  to  the  Senate  the 
following  proposition,  at  the  desire  of  the  Senior 
Proctor : 

Cum    Vir    Dignissimus    Jacobus    Marriott, 

LL.D.  Procancettarii  Munus  ad  obeundum  nu- 

per  electus  sit  Regiis  negotiis  detentus,   Placeat 

Fobis,  ut  ob  hanc  causam  liceat  eidem  Procan- 

cellariatus  Munus  recusare. 

The  Members  of  the  Senate  were  about  to 
signify  their  approbation  or  disapprobation  of  the 
reason  alleged,  in  the  same  form  that  was  used 
in  the  case  of  Dr.  Thomas  on  Dec.  2,  17776; 
but  it  was  ultimately  decided  that  the  opinion  of 
the  University  Counsel  should  be  taken,  whether 
the  claim  of  Privilege  on  the  part  of  Sir  J.  Mar- 
riott, was  a  legal  one,  and  the  Senior  Proctor, 
after  the  Bedell  had  called  up  the  Houses,  an- 

4  He  was  Judge  of  the  Court  of  Admiralty. 

5  A  Senior  Fellow  of  St.  John's. 

6  Vide  ante  p.  55. 


58 

nounced  this  decision  to  the  Senate.     The  Con- 
gregation was  then  continued  to  Nov.  16. 

Nov.  13.  At  a  Congregation  held  this  morn- 
ing, the  Senior  Proctor  read  to  the  Senate  the 
opinion  of  the  University  Counsel  (Mr.  Cust  and 
Mr.  Jackson),  viz.  that  no  process  in  a  Court  of 
Law  could  oblige  Sir  J.  Marriott  to  serve  the 
Office  of  Vice-Chancellor,  while  he  continued 
Judge  of  the  Court  of  Admiralty. 

At  this  Congregation  the  Senior  Proctor  was 
about  to  read  a  proposition  for  excusing  Sir  James, 
but  it  was  objected  that  as  the  Congregation  on 
the  9th  had  been  adjourned  to  the  16th,  it  ought 
not  to  be  decided  till  that  day;  in  consequence 
of  which  nothing  further  was  done,  and  the  Proc- 
tors left  the  Congregation. 

Nov.  16.  When  the  Senate  was  assembled, 
Mr.  Dawes  (one  of  the  Bedells)  read  to  them 
the  following  proposition : 

Cum    Vir    Dignissimus    Jacobus    Marriott, 

LL.D.  Pro-Cancettarii  Munus  ad  obeundum  nu- 

per  electus,  sit  Regiis  negotiis  detentus,  Placeat 

Vobis,  ut  ob  hanc  causam  liceat  eidem  Procan- 

cellariatus  Munus  recusare. 

The  assent  or  dissent  to  it  was  delivered  in 
writing,  as  in  the  case  of  Dr.  Thomas ;  and  the 
number  for  admitting  the  excuse  was  31,  against 
it  19-  The  Senior  Proctor  announced  the  decision 
by  the  word  Comprobant,  and  immediately  dis- 
solved the  Congregation, 


59 


Sermon  ana  £prrrf)  on  ttje  tfitiiy  of  jiotomtor. 

On  the  fifth  of  November,  a  Sermon  is  preach- 
ed, in  the  morning,  at  St.  Mary's  Church,  by  one 
of  the  Heads,,  according  to  his  Seniority7,  or  by 
some  other  by  his  appointment. 

The  Doctors  in  Divinity  are  in  their  copes, 
Doctors  in  other  Faculties  in  their  scarlet  gowns, 
and  Noblemen  in  their  proper  habits. 

If  the  Vice-Chancellor  or  any  Head  of  a  Col- 
lege, be  a  Master  of  Arts,  he  has  no  cope,  but 
wears  his  hood  squared. 

If  he  be  a  Doctor  of  any  other  Faculty,  he 
wears  his  scarlet  gown. 

The  Proctors,  or  their  Deputies,  are  in  Con- 
gregation habit. 

They  meet  at  eleven  o'clock  in  the  Vestry. 
The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  ten. 


7  According  to  his  Seniority :  that  is,  Seniority  of  Degree, 
and  not  Seniority  as  Head  of  a  College.  For  the  Decree  of 
Oct.  20,,  1606,  says  "  The  Senior  Doctor  in  Divinity,  being 
Head  of  a  College,  shall  preach  the  fifth  day  of  November 
next,  and  the  next  year  the  next  Doctor  of  Divinity  in  Se- 
niority, being  likewise  a  Head  of  a  College,  and  so  all  the 
rest  of  the  Doctors,  and  others  the  Heads  of  Houses  being 
Divines,  shall  preach  successively  in  their  Seniority,  perpe- 
tuisfuturis  temporibus,  either  by  himself,  or  (upon  just  cause 
to  be  excused  and  allowed  by  the  Vice-Chancellor  for  the 
time  being)  by  some  other  Head  of  a  College,  by  him, 
whose  course  it  is,  to  be  procured,  &c.  Lib-  Stat.  p.  471- 


60 

The  two  Proctors  go  to  the  reading  desk,  and 
the  Senior  reads  the  Litany  as  far  as  the  Lord's 
Prayer,  at  which  the  Vice-Chancellor  begins,  and 
goes  through  the  rest  of  the  Litany  service. 

They  return  to  the  Vestry,  and  the  Doctors  in 
Divinity  put  on  their  Scarlet  gowns. 

The  Proctors  change  the  Congregation  hahit 
for  their  hoods  squared,  and  go  to  their  places  in 
the  Pit,  to  hear  the  Sermon. 

In  the  afternoon  the  bell  begins  to  ring  at 
one  o'clock. 

At  two  o'clock,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  Noble- 
men, Heads,  Doctors,  and  Proctors,  assemble  in 
the  Vestry  at  St.  Mary's  Church,  and  go  from 
thence  to  the  Senate-House,  where  a  speech,  in 
Latin,  is  delivered  by  a  Master  of  Arts  (who 
comes  to  the  Vestry  in  his  proper  habit)  ap- 
pointed by  the  Vice-Chancellor  of  the  preceding 
year. 

The  Noblemen  wear  their  proper  habits,  the 
Doctors  their  Scarlet  gowns,  the  Proctors  are  in 
Congregation  habit,  and  have  their  books.  % 

A  Bedell  precedes  the  Vice-Chancellor  to 
the  upper  end  of  the  Senate-House. 

Another  Bedell  precedes  the  Orator  to  the 
Rostrum. 

When   the   fifth    of    November    happens    on 


61 


a   Sunday,   the   speech   in   the   Senate-House    is 
made  immediately  after  the  afternoon  Sermon8. 

If  the  Vice-Chancellor  Elect  be  not  sworn 
into  his  Office,  the  Proctors  sit  in  his  place  at 
St.  Mary's,  and  the  Senior  reads  the  whole  of 
the  Litany  service. 


matriculation. 

On  the  day  after  the  division  of  every  Term, 
or  on  the  following  day,  there  is  a  Matricula- 
tion9. 

The  Registrary  gives  notice  of  the  time,  by 
a  paper  affixed  to  the  School  doors. 

The  Proctors  wear  their  hoods  squared. 

The  Matriculation  takes  place  in  the  Senate- 
House. 

The  Persons  to  be  Matriculated  write  their 
names  in  the  Registrary's  book. 

8  Nov.  5,  1826.     The  speech  was  before  the  Sermon. 

9  28  Feb.  1806.     Cum  tempora,  quibus  hactenus  haberi  solila 
est  Matriculatio,  usu  comperia  sint  incommoda,  et  propter  hanc, 
alque  alias  causas,  ipsa  Matriculatio  ab  Alumnis  cceperit  prce- 
termitti  ; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  in  posterum,  pro  die  insequente  cujusque 
termini  Jlnem,  dies  instituatur  ad  Matriculationem  peragendam, 
qui  vel  proxime  vel  uno  interjecto  sequatur  mediam  termini 
cujusque  partem :  Atque  ut  Us,  qui  post  decimum  Octobris  diem, 
Anno  Domini  1805,  intra  Academiam  per  ires  terminos  com- 
morati,  non  matriculati  fuerint,  nullus  omnino  computetur  ter- 
minus, nixi  ab  illo  die,  in  quo  Matriculationem  rite  perjecerint, 


62 

A  copy  of  the  Matriculation  Oath   is  given 
to  each  Person. 

A   Fellow-Commoner   first   takes    the    Oath, 
which  is  as  follows : 

Cancellario,  Pro-Cancellarioque,  Academies 
Cantabrigiensis,  quatenus  jus  fasque  est,  et  pro 
ordine  in  quo  Juerim,  quamdiu  in  hac  Republicd 
degam,  comiter  obtemperabo ;  leges,  statuta,  mores 
approbates,  et  priviligia  Cantabrigiensis  Acade- 
mice,  quantum  in  me  est,  observabo ;  pietatis  et 
bonarum  liter  arum  progressum,  et  hujus  Academics 
statum,  honorem,  et  dignitatem  tuebor,  quoad 
vivam,  meoque  suffragio  atque  consilio,  rogatus 
et  non  rogatus,  defendam,  in  h&c  autem  verba 
Juro,  secundum  tenor  em  Senatus-Consulti  injuran- 
tium  cautelam  et  levamen  facti.  Ita  me  Deus 
adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia.  Lih.  Stat. 
p.  526. 

There  is  the  following  Grace  subjoined  to 
the  Oath: 

3  Jul.  1647. 

Placeat  Vobis  ut,  in  majorem,  in  posterum, 
cautelam  jurantium  et  levamen,  h&c  verba  sint 
affixa  juramentis  Academic  Matriculationis,  Ad- 
missionis,  Creationis. 

Senatus  Cantabrigiensis  decrevit,  et  declaravit, 
eos  omnes  qui  monitionibus,  correctionibus,  mulctis, 
etpcenis  Statutorum,  Legum,  Decretorum,  Ordi- 
nationum,  et  laudabilium  Consuetudinum  hujus 
Academic  transgressoribus  quovis  modo  incum* 


63 

bentibus,  humiliter  se  submiserint,  nee  esse,  nee 
habendos  esse,  perjurii  reos :  et  ut  hcec  vestra 
concessio  pro  statuto  habeatur,  et  infra  decent 
dies  in  libris  procuratorum  inscribatur.  Lib.  Stat* 
p.  527. 

The  Senior  Proctor  administers  the  Oath  to 
the  other  Fellow-Commoners  (four  or  five  at 
a  time)  in  the  following  words : 

Idem  jur amentum  quad  prcestitit  A.  B.  in 
sud  Persona,  vos  quoque  prcestabitis  in  vestris 
Personis:  ita  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei 
Evangelia. 

The  Oath  is  taken  in  the  same  manner  by 
the  Pensioners,  and  then  by  the  Sizars ;  the 
first  of  each  Order,  reading  the  whole  as  above. 

Each  Proctor,  if  present,  receives  three  shillings 
and  four  pence  from  the  Registrary. 

When  a  Nobleman  is  Matriculated,  the  Senior 
Proctor,  (instead  of  administering  the  Oath  to 
him)  holding  his  right  hand  says, 

Z)omine,  dabis  fidem,  in  verbo  Honoris,  quod 
Cancellario,  c|c. — as  above. 

If  the  usual  day  for  Matriculation  happen 
to  fall  on  a  Sunday,  the  Matriculation  may 
take  place  either  on  the  day  before  or  the  day 
after. 


(jTomiunattcm 


These  are  published  early  in  December:   for 
information  respecting  them,  see  Posted. 


of 

On  the  16th  of  December1  the  Term  ends. 
There  is  a  Congregation  ex  Statute. 
The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine  o'clock. 

The  following  Graces  are  passed  in  the  Caput 
and  Regent-House  only : 

Cum  tempus  adeo  breve  sit  ad  Quadragesi- 
mam,  ut  Qutestionista  et  Inceptores  hujus  anni  mx 
commode  exercitationes  suas  perficere  queant  : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  liceat  eisdem  in  suo  Grege 
disputare  et  dedamare,  quolibet  profesto  die,  tarn 
extra  terminum,  quam  in  termino,  temporibus 
idoneis,  per  Dominos  Procuratores  assignandis. 

Cum  dies  ad  Philosophicam  disputationem 
in  Regiis  Statutis  assignati,  non  sufficiant  In- 
cepturis  hoc  anno  in  Artibus,  ad  actus  suos 
scholasticos  peragendos : 

1  This  Term  begins  October  10th,  and  ends  December 
16th.  The  whole  of  the  10th  and  16th  are  reckoned  inclusive, 
consequently  the  whole  Term  consists  of  22  days  in  October, 
30  in  November,  16  in  December,  and  equals  68  whole  days. 

The  half  Term  consists  of  34,  whole  days. 

The  Term  therefore  divides  on  November  12th  at  midnight. 


65 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut,  Auctoritate  vestra,  liceat 
cisdem  singulis  diebus  profestis  cujuslibet  septi- 
mance  in  termino,  cum  Magistris  Artium  dispu- 
tare,  tarn  in  scholis  Dialecticis9  et  Philosophicis, 
quam  in  Juridicis,  ab  hord  septimd  ad  nonam,  et 
a  nond  ad  undecimam  matutinam,  et  ab  hordprimd 
ad  tertiam,  et  a  tertid  ad  qumtam  pomeridianam : 
ita  tamen  ut  Procuratorum  alter,  vel  aliquis 
Regens,  adsit*. 

One  of  the  Bedells  calls  the  Houses,  and 
the  Vice-Chancellor  reads  the  service3  contained 
in  the  Statute  Book,  p.  546.  He  then  dissolves 
the  Congregation,  with  the  Term,  in  the  following 
form : 


dissolvimus  hanc  Congregationem  Re- 
gentium  et  Non-Regentium,  una  cum  termino, 
usque  ad  decimum  tertium  diem  Januarii. 


for 

About  this  time  the  Vice-Chancellor  gives  out 
the  subjects  for  the  Prizes  offered  by  His  Royal 
Highness  the  Chancellor,  and  other  Persons,  in 
the  following  form : 

" Lodge,   Dec.—,   18 

I.  "  His  Royal  Highness  The  CHANCELLOR 
being  pleased  to  give  annually  a  Third  Gold 

2  These   two   Graces   were   read  in  English  and  passed 
at  a  Convocation,  Dec.  29,  1740.     Lib.  Grat.  Iota,  508. 

3  This  he  does,  even  though  he  be  not  in  Orders. 

E 


66 

Medal  for  the  encouragement  of  English  Poetry, 
to  such  resident  Undergraduate  as  shall  compose 
the  best  Ode,  or  the  best  Poem  in  Heroic  Verse ; 

"  The  Vice-Chancellor  gives  notice  that  the 
Subject  for  the  present  year  is  • 

"  These  Exercises  are  to  be  sent  in  to  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor on  or  before  March  3 1 ;  and  are  not  to  exceed 
200  lines  in  length." 

II.  "  The  REPRESENTATIVES  in  PARLIA- 
MENT for  this  University  being  pleased  to  give 
annually 

(1)  "  Two  Prizes  of  Fifteen  Guineas  each,  for 
the  encouragement  of  Latin  Prose  Composition, 
to  be  open  to  all  Bachelors  of  Arts,  without  dis- 
tinction of  years,  who  are  not  of  sufficient  standing 
to  take  the  Degree  of  Master  of  Arts :  and 

(2)  "  Two  other  Prizes  of  Fifteen  Guineas 
each,   to    be  open   to    all   Undergraduates,    who 
shall  have  resided  not  less  than   seven  Terms, 
at  the  time  when  the  Exercises  are  to  be  sent 
in; 

"  The  Subjects  for  the  present  year  are 

(1)  "  For  the  Bachelors 

(2)  "  For  the  Undergraduates... 


"  These  Exercises  are  to  be  sent   in  on  or  before 
April  30." 


67 

III.  "  Sir  WILLIAM  BROWNE  having  be- 
queathed Three  Gold  Medals,  value  Five  Guineas 
each,  to  such  resident  Undergraduates  as  shall 
compose 

(1)  "  The  best  Greek  Ode  in  imitation  of 
Sappho ; 

(2)  "  The  best   Latin  Ode  in  imitation   of 
Horace ; 

(3)  "  The   best   Greek   Epigram  after   the 
model   of  the   Anthologia,   and   the    best   Latin 
Epigram  after  the  model  of  Martial : 

"  The  Subjects  for  the  present  year  are 

(1)  "  For  the  Greek  Ode 

(2)  «  For  the  Latin  Ode 

(3)  "  For  the  Epigrams 


"  These  Exercises  are  to  be  sent  in  on  or  before 
April  30.  The  Greek  Ode  is  not  to  exceed  twenty,  and 
the  Latin  Ode  twenty-five  stanzas." 

IV.  "  The  PORSON  PRIZE  is  the  interest  of 
<£.400  Stock,  to  be  annually  employed  in  the 
purchase  of  one  or  more  Greek  books,  to  be  given 
to  such  resident  Undergraduate  as  shall  make  the 
best  Translation  of  a  proposed  passage  in  Shake- 
speare, Ben  Jonson,  Massinger,  or  Beaumont  and 
Fletcher,  into  Greek  Verse. 

"  The  Subject  for  the  present  year  is 

"  The  metre  of  the  translation,  if  the  selection  be  from 
a  Tragedy,  to  be  Tragicum  lambicum  Trimetrum  Acata- 
lecticum  or  Tragicum  Trochaicum  Tetrametrum  Cata- 

E  2 


68 


lecticum;  if  from  a  Comedy,  the  metre  of  the  translation 
to  be  Comicum  lambicum  Trimetrum  Acatalecticum,  or 
Comicum  Trochaicum  Catahcticum.  These  Exercises 
are  to  be  accentuated,  and  sent  in  on  or  before  April  30. 

(f  All  the  above  Exercises  are  to  be  sent  in  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor  privately  :  each  is  to  have  some  motto 
prefixed ;  and  to  be  accompanied  by  a  paper  sealed  up, 
with  the  same  motto  on  the  outside;  which  paper  is  to 
enclose  another,  folded  up,  having  the  Candidate's  Name 
and  College  written  within. 

"  The  papers  containing  the  Names  of  those  Can- 
didates who  may  not  succeed,  will  be  destroyed  un- 
opened. 

"No  prize  will  be  given  to  any  Exercise  which  is 
written,  wholly,  or  in  part,  (or  of  which  the  title,  motto, 
superscription,  address,  &c.  are  written),  in  the  hand- 
writing of  the  Candidate. 

"  Any  Candidate  is  at  liberty  to  send  in  his  Exercise 
printed  or  lithographed. 

:(  No  prize  will  be  given  to  any  Candidate  who  has 
not,  at  the  time  for  sending  in  the  Exercises,  resided 
one  Term  at  least." 

A.  .B.  Vice-Chancellor r 


On  Christmas  Day  there  is  no  forenoon  Ser- 
mon at  St.  Mary's  Church. 

After  Sermon  in  the  afternoon,  an  Anthem 
is  sung. 

The  Doctors  wear  their  Scarlet  gowns,  the 
Noblemen  their  proper  habits,  and  the  Proctors 
their  hoods  squared. 


69 


(ftlmim  on  tfje  J3ag  before  ILent  l&ttm  begim. 

On  the  twelfth  of  January  (the  day  before 
the  Lent  Term  begins)  the  Lady  Margaret's 
Professor  of  Divinity,  or  some  one  appointed 
by  him4,  preaches  ad  Clerum  at  St.  Mary's. 
Stat.  Elm.  45.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  254. 

If  this  day  happen  on  a  Sunday,  there  is 
no  English  Sermon  in  the  morning. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine. 

The  Professor,  or  the  Person  appointed  by 
him  to  preach  is  brought5  to  the  Vestry  by 
a  Bedell. 


Ifrgtnning  of  ?lrnt  rrrm, 

The    Lent    Term    begins   on    the    thirteenth 
of  January. 


Examination  of  Questions*  in  UK 


The  Vice-Chancellor,  at  the  desire  of  the 
Proctors,  appoints  the  time  for  the  public  Exa- 
mination of  the  Questionists. 

It  is  usually  on  the  first  Monday  in  the 
Lent  Term. 

4  Who   may   preach   the   Clerum   as   an  exercise  for  the 
degree  of  Doctor  or  Bachelor  in  Divinity. 

5  This  has  of  late  years  been  discontinued. 


70 

The  Registrary  gives  notice  of  it,  by  a  paper 
affixed  to  the  School  doors. 

The  Junior  Proctor  gives  notice  at  each 
College  of  the  time  when  the  Questionists  are 
to  pay  their  fees  to  him:  and  the  Registrary 
appoints  a  day  for  subscription,  by  a  notice 
affixed  to  the  School  doors. 

The  form  to  be  subscribed  is  as  follows : 

I9  A.  B.,  do  declare  that  I  am,  bona  fide, 
a  Member  of  the  Church  of  England,  as  by  Law 
Established.  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa,  p.  524. 

The  Questionists  are  usually  divided  by  the 
Moderators  into  eight  Classes,  according  to  their 
several  merits,  as  exhibited  in  the  disputations 
in  the  Schools. 

This  classification  is  usually  made  public  on 
the  Thursday  preceding  the  Examination. 

The  days  for  Examination  are  Monday,  Tues- 
day, Wednesday,  Thursday,  and  Friday. 

On  the  Monday  morning,  the  Questionists 
come  to  the  Senate-House  from  their  respective 
Colleges,  attended  by  a  Master  of  Arts,  who 
is  called  the  Father  of  the  College  to  which 
he  belongs. 

Previously  to  the  commencement  of  each 
Examination,  the  names  of  the  Questionists  are 
called  over  in  the  Senate-House  by  the  Proctors 
from  a  list  given  to  them  by  the  Moderators. 
Those  who  are  not  there  precisely  at  the  time 


71 

when  their  names  are  called,  are  subject  to  a  fine 
of  one  shilling. 

The  Proctors  appear  in  their  Congregation 
habit,  during  the  whole  of  the  Examination; 
and  the  Examiners  wear  their  hoods  hanging 
down. 

The  Examinations  commence  each  day  at 
eight  o'clock  in  the  morning,  and  continue  till 
five  in  the  afternoon,  with  the  exception  of  half 
an  hour  at  nine,  an  hour  and  an  half  at  halfpast 
eleven,  and  half  an  hour  at  three. 

The  first  six  Classes  undergo  a  further  Exami- 
nation at  the  Moderators'  rooms  in  the  evenings 
of  Monday  and  Tuesday. 

The  following  regulations,  applicable  to  the 
seventh  and  eighth  Classes  only,  began  to  be 
acted  upon  at  the  Examination  in  January  1826: 

These  Classes  are  examined,  on  the  first 
two  days,  in  the  Elements  of  Mathematics,  as 
heretofore;  on  the  third  day,  in  Locke's  Essay 
on  the  Human  Understanding,  Paley's  Moral 
Philosophy,  and  his  Evidences  of  Christianity; 
and  on  the  fourth  day  they  are  required  to 
translate  passages  from  the  first  six  books  of 
the  Iliad,  and  of  the  JSneid,  and  to  answer 
grammatical  and  other  questions,  arising  im- 
mediately out  of  such  passages. 

On  Friday6  morning,  at  eight  o'clock,  a  new 

6  Cum  Syndicis  vertris  visum  fuerit,  tempus,  Exammationi 
Quceslionistarum  annuce  hactemis  concessum,  vix  sttfficere; 

Placcaf 


72 

Classification  is  made  and  exhibited  on  the  pillars 
in  the  Senate-House,  in  which  the  Candidates 
for  Honours  are  divided  into  Classes  called 
Brackets.  The  Brackets  themselves  are  arranged 
according  to  the  order  of  merit,  but  the  names 
in  each  Bracket  are  placed  alphabetically,  and 
the  relative  merits  of  the  Persons  in  each  Bracket 
are  determined  by  a  subsequent  Examination. 
If  any  one  be  decidedly  superior  to  those  below 
him,  he  is  placed  in  a  Bracket  by  himself. 

On  Saturday  morning,  the  list  of  those  who 
have  obtained  Honours — divided  into  Wranglers, 
Senior  Optimes7,  and  Junior  Optimes  —  is  made 
public,  signed  by  the  Proctors  and  Examiners. 

At  the  same  time,  the  names  of  all  the 
other  Questionists,  (except  the  last  ten  or  twelve) 

Placeat  Foils,  ut  dicta  Examinatio  in  quintum  Diem  continu- 
etur ,  ita  ut,  quinto  isto  die,  pro  Libitu  Examinatorum,  suppleri 
possit  id,  quod  accurate  honorum  designationi  deesse  videbitur. 

Placeat  etiam,  ut  Qucestiones  ad  Philosophiam  Moralem 
pertinentes,  quce  hactenus  die  tertio  propositce  sunt,  in  posterum 
die  quarto  proponantur. 

Placeat  etiam,  ut  nominum  distributio,  secundum  formdm 
Statutam,  in  Classes  quam  minimas,  Jiat  in  posterum  ad  horam 
eandem  diei  quinti,  ac  hactenus  diei  quarti. 

7  Formerly,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the  two  Proctors,  and 
the  Senior  Regent  of  the  year,  had  each  the  privilege  of 
nominating  a  Senior  Optime,  and  of  placing  his  name  on 
the  first  Tripos.  Some  years  since,  a  Person  thus  nominated 
claimed  to  be  a  Candidate  for  the  Classical  Medal.  His  claim 
was  disallowed;  and  in  consequence  of  the  discussion  which 
took  place  on  the  subject,  this  absurd  practice  was  shortly 
afterwards  discontinued. 


73 

arranged   according   to   their   respective  merit,  is 
also  exhibited,  signed  by  the  Examiners. 

The  last  ten  or  twelve  are  usually  placed  by 
themselves  in  alphabetical  order. 


of  tijr 

On  the  Saturday  in  the  Examination  week, 
there  is  a  Congregation  at  ten  o'clock. 

A  Bedell  calls  up  the  Houses,  and  the  Senior 
Moderator  makes  his  speech,  standing  on  the 
left  hand  of  the  Vice-Chancellor,  who  sits  in  the 
lower  chair. 

The  Junior  Proctor  delivers  the  paper  of  Se- 
niority to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  subscribed  thus  : 

Examinati  et  approbati  a  nobis. 

This  paper  is  signed  by  the  Proctors,  the 
Moderators,  and  the  other  Examiners. 

The  Caput  is  called,  for  passing  the  Supplicats 
of  the  Questionists  8. 

The  Name  of  each  College  is  to  be  written 
on  every  Supplicat,  which  must  be  signed  by  the 
Lecturer9.  Stat.  de  Gratiis  Concedendis.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  234. 

8  In  consequence  of  the  increased  number  of  the  Ques- 
tionists, it  is  now  usual  for  the  Caput  and  the  Registrary  to 
meet  at  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Lodge  on  the  Friday  to  examine 
the  Supplicats. 

9  Nee  plures  proponant  ierminos,    in   quibus   studuerint    in 
Academia,  opposition?*,   responsiones,  aut  alia  Scholastica  Ex- 

crcitia, 


74 

A  Certificate  is  also  given  to  the  Caput, 
signed  and  sealed  by  the  Master  of  each  College 
or  his  Representative,  shewing  that  each  Ques- 
tionist  in  his  College  has  kept  his  full  number  of 
Terms :  but  if  any  one  have  not  kept  the  requisite 
number,  the  deficiency  must  be  mentioned  in  the 
Supplicat,  and  a  Certificate,  explaining  the  cause, 
is  delivered  to  the  Caput  by  the  Lecturer l. 

He  also  delivers  a  Certificate  of  his  having 
passed  the  Previous  Examination. 

A  Fellow  of  King's  College  requires  neither 
a  Certificate  of  Terms,  nor  of  having  been  ex- 
amined. His  Grace  is  not  presented  to  the 
Caput,  but  merely  shewn  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
and  read  in  the  Regent-House  only. 

If  any   Questionist   have  been   prevented  by 

ercitia,  quam  ret  fert  veritas :  aliter  ipsa  Gratia  nulla  sit.  Et 
quifalsce  petitioni  subscripserit  voce  sua  in  Senatu  per  biennium 
sit  ipso  facto  privatus,  et  inhabilis  etiam  ab  aliquod  Officium 
et  Munus  gerendum  infra  Academiam  per  idem  tempus.  Stat. 
de  Gratiis  Concedendis.  Lib.  Stat.  234. 

1  Jan.  4>,  1777-  At  the  Bachelors1  Commencement,  a 
Grace  was  proposed  for  Robert  Parkinson,  Emman.  Coll. 
with  this  exception  as  to  the  Terms  he  had  kept,  viz.  "  Uno 
Excepto,  in  quo  propter  errorem  calculi  non  adfuit."  His 
case  was,  that  he  had  actually  resided  the  major  part  of  ten 
several  Terms,  but  one  of  them  was  the  Term  of  his  ad- 
mission, which  would  have  been  allowed  him,  according  to 
the  Decree,  if  he  had  not  resided.  By  this  mistake,  he 
wanted  one  Term  to  complete  the  twelve  required  by  the 
Decree.  The  Caput,  in  consideration  of  his  good  behaviour, 
certified  to  them,  passed  his  Grace ;  only  requesting  that  the 
Registrary  would  enter  a  memorandum  of  it,  that  it 
not  be  drawn  into  a  precedent  for  the  future. 


75 

illness*  from  keeping  all  his  Terms,  the  Certificate 
is  to  be  in  the  following  form : 

/  hereby  certify  to  the  Senate  and  University 

of  Cambridge  that  Mr.  A.  B.  of College 

has    been    under   my   care  from   the  —  day  of 

till  the  —  day  of ;  and  that  during 

that  time  he   could  not  with  safety,  on  account 
of  his  health,  return  to  Cambridge. 

Witness  my  hand  this  —  day  of 18 

C.  D. 

(M.  JD.  or  Surgeon.) 
(Residence) 

The  Registrary  brings  the  Subscription-book 
to  the  Caput,  and  shews  that  each  Questionist 
has  subscribed  the  proper  form. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  then  reads  the  Supplicats 
to  the  Caput,  and  on  those  that  are  admitted  he 
writes  Ad. 

He  then  gives  the  Supplicats  to  one  of  the 
Bedells,  who  takes  them  into  the  Non-Regent 
House  to  be  read  by  the  Scrutators.  The  Senior 
Scrutator  reads  one  quite  through,  and  then  says 
Idem  Supplicat  A.  B.9  C.  D.,  fyc.  If  no  one 
be  objected  to,  he  walks  and  says  omnes  placent : 

2  JuneQQ,  1805.  Placeat  Vobis,  ut  si  quis  supplicans  pro 
gradu  Baccalaureatus  in  Artibus,  adversam  valetudinem  excu- 
saverit,  quod  terminum  proxime  sequcntem,  vel  alium  quemcunque 
terminum  futurum  non  compleverit,  per  literas  testimoniales, 
nomine  Doctoris  Medicines  vel  Chirurgi  subscriptas,  ct  verbis 
sequeniibus  conceptas,  vos  cerliorcs  facial  se  necessario  ab  Aca- 
demta  abfuissc. 


76 

but  if  an  objection  be  taken  to  any  one,  the  votes 
must  be  regularly  taken  with  respect  to  him; 
and  unless  there  be  a  majority  in  his  favor,  the 
Scrutator  says  A.  B.  non placet;  reliqui  placent. 

The  Supplicats,  in  which  any  cause  is  assigned 
for  not  keeping  the  requisite  number  of  Terms, 
are  to  be  read  separately. 

The  Bedell  then  takes  the  Supplicats  to  the 
Regent  House,  where  the  Senior  Proctor  reads 
them  in  the  same  manner  as  the  Senior  Scrutator 
has  done  in  the  Non-Regent  House.  If  they  be 
approved,  the  Proctors  walk,  and  the  Senior  says, 
Placeat  omnes ;  placeat  vobis,  ut  intrent. 

If  any  one  be  objected  to,  the  Senior  Proctor 
must  take  the  votes  in  the  Regent  House,  in  the 
same  manner  as  the  Senior  Scrutator  has  done  in 
the  Non-Regent  House,  and  if  the  Non-placets 
be  equal  to,  or  greater  than  the  Placets,  he  says 
A.  B.  non  placet;  reliqui  placent. 

The  Supplicats  are  then  delivered  to  the  Re- 
gistrary,  who  writes  on  them,  Lect.  et  Concess. 
die  Jan. 

In  the  mean  time  the  Questionists  put  on 
their  hoods  over  their  Undergraduates'  gowns ; 
and  the  School-keeper  gives  to  each  of  them  a 
printed  Copy  of  the  Oath  he  is  to  take  at  his 
Admission. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  takes  the  chair,  and 
a  Bedell  having  desired  the  respective  Fathers 
to  be  in  readiness  with  their  Sons,  precedes  the 


77 

Father  of  the  Senior  Wrangler  (the  rest  of  the 
Fathers 3  following  with  their  Sons)  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor.  The  Father  of  the  Senior  Wrangler, 
taking  his  right  hand,  presents  him  in  these 
words  : 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie, 

et  tota   Universitas ;    Prcesento  vobis  hunc  Juve- 

nem,  quern  scio,  tarn  moribus  quam  doctrind,  esse 

idoneum  ad  respondendum  qucestioni:  idque  tibi 

fide  med  pr<zsto,  totique  Academic. 

The  Senior  Wrangler  then  takes  the  Oaths 
of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy;  and  the  Senior 
Proctor  (with  his  Brother  standing  by  him)  reads 
to  him  the  following  Oath : 

Jurabis,  quod  nihil  ex  Us  omnibus  sciens 
volens  prtetermisisti,  quez  per  leges  aut  probatas 
consuetudines  hujus  Academics  ad  hunc  Gradum 
quern  ambis  adipiscendum,  aut  peragenda  aut 
persolvenda  requiruntur ;  nisi  quatenus  per  Gra- 
tiam  ab  Academid  concessam  tecum  dispensatum 
fuerit. 

Jurabis  etiam,  quod  Cancellario  et  Procan- 
cellario  nostro  comiter  obtemperabis :  et  quod 
Statuta  nostra,  Ordinationes,  et  Consuetudines 
approbatas  observabis. 

Denique  jurabis,  quod  compositionem  inter 
Academiam  et  Collegium  Regale  factam  sciens 

*  The  Fathers  of  King's,  Trinity,  and  St.  John's,  follow 
the  Father  of  the  Senior  Wrangler.  The  other  Colleges 
follow  according  to  the  Seniority  of  their  respective  Fathers. 


78 

volens  non  violabis :  in  hac  autem  verba  jurdbis, 
secundum  tenorem  Senatusconsulti  in  cautelam 
jurantium  facti 4. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia. 

He  then  kneels  down  before  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, who,  taking  his  hands  between  his  own, 
admits  him  in  the  following  words : 

Authoritate  mihi  commissd,  admitto  te  ad 
respondendum  qucestioni:  in  nomine  Patris,  et 
Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 

The  Father  of  King's  College  next  presents 
his  Sons:  then  the  Questionists  of  Trinity  and 
St.  John's  are  presented;  and  after  them  the 
Questionists  of  the  other  Colleges,  according  to 
the  Seniority  of  the  respective  Fathers.  Four 
or  five  are  usually  presented  at  a  time. 

As  they  are  presented,  they  are  directed  by 
one  of  the  Bedells  to  the  South  side  of  the  Senate- 
House. 

s  Jul.  1647. 

*  Placet  Vobis,  ut  in  major  em  in  posterum  cautelam  juran- 
tium et  levamen,  hose  verba  sint  annexa  juramentis  Academics 
Matriculationis,  Admissionis,  Creatonis : 

"  Senatus  Cantabrigiensis  decrevit  et  dedaravit  eos  omnes, 
"  qui  monitionibus,  correctionibus,  mulctis,  et  pcsnis  statutorum, 
"  legum,  decretorum,  ordinationum,  injunctionum,  et  laudabilium 
"  consuetudinum  hujus  Academics  transgressoribus  quovis  modo 
"  incumbentibus  humiliter  se  submiserint,  nee  esse  nee  habendos 
"  esse  perjurii  reos" 

Et  ut  hcec  vestra  concessio  pro  Statuto  habeatur,  et  infra 
decent  dies  in  libris  Procuratorum  inscribatur. 


79 

When  all  have  been  presented,  the  Senior 
Proctor  administers  to  them  (four  or  five  at  a  time) 
the  same  Oaths  which  have  been  taken  by  the 
Senior  Wrangler,  in  the  following  words : 

Eadem  Juramenta,  qu<&  prcestitit  A.  B.,  in 
sud  Persona,  vos  quoque  prcestabitis  in  vestris 
Personis : 

Ita  vos  Deus  adjuvet  et  Sancta  Dei  Evan- 
gelia. 

When  all  have  been  sworn,  they  are  admitted 
by  the  Vice-Chancellor  in  the  same  manner  as 
the  Senior  Wrangler  has  been  admitted. 

They  are  sworn  and  admitted5  in  the  order 
in  which  their  names  are  placed  in  the  Lists 
signed  by  the  Proctor  and  Examiners. 

When  the  Admissions  are  concluded,  the 
Vice-Chancellor  dissolves  the  Congregation. 


(Examinations  for 

The  following  Notice  is  affixed  to  the  pillars 
in  the  Senate-House  during  the  Examination. 

"  The  Candidates  for  Dr.  Smith's  Prizes 
are  desired  to  give  in  their  Names  to  The  Vice- 
Chancellor,  The  Master  of  Trinity  College,  The 
Lucasian  Professor,  The  Plumian  Professor, 

5  As  soon  as  they  are  admitted,  they  go  to  the  Sophs' 
School  to  answer  the  question,  which  is  proposed  to  them 
by  the  Fathers  of  their  respective  Colleges. 


80 

and  The  Lowndian  Professor,  on  Saturday  the 
instant. 

Monday     the  -.  Tuesday     the and 

Wednesday  the  — are  appointed  for  the  days 

of  Examination" 


On  the  29th  of  January  (the  day  of  the  King's 
Accession)  the  Vice-Chancellor,  Proctors,  &c.  meet 
in  the  Vestry  at  St.  Mary's.  The  bell  usually 
begins  to  ring  a  little  before  eleven  o'clock. 

The  Doctors  m  Divinity  are  in  their  copes ; 
the  Noblemen  in  their  proper  habits ;  the  Doctors 
in  other  Faculties  in  their  Scarlet  gowns;  and 
the  Proctors  in  their  Congregation  habit. 

The  Proctors  go  into  the  Reader's  desk, 
and  the  Senior  begins  the  Litany  Service,  and 
reads  as  far  as  the  Lord's  Prayer:  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  then  goes  on  and  reads  to  the  end 
of  the  Litany  Service. 

If  either  of  the  Proctors  be  absent,  his  Deputy 
attends  for  him.  But  in  the  absence  of  the  Senior 
Proctor,  the  Junior  Proctor  reads  the  Service. 

After  the  Service,  they  return  to  the  Vestry, 
where  the  Doctors  in  Divinity  change  their  copes 
for  their  Scarlet  gowns,  and*  the  Proctors  their 
Congregation  habit  for  their  hoods  squared. 


81 


A  Doctor  in  Divinity  (not  being  a  Head 
of  a  College)  according  to  his  Seniority,  or  some 
one  appointed  by  him,  preaches.  Lib.  Graf.  1. 
p.  6. 

After  the  Sermon,  an  Anthem  is 


an&  Sermon  on  tfte  Cfjtrtietft  of 
gfcnttarp* 

On  the  thirtieth  of  January,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  (if  Doctor  in  Divinity  in  his  cope) 
and  Doctors  in  Divinity  in  their  copes,  Noblemen 
and  Doctors  in  other  Faculties  in  their  black 
gowns,  and  the  Proctors  in  Congregation  habit, 
meet  in  the  Vestry  at  St.  Mary's  at  eleven 
o'clock. 

The  Litany  is  read  as  on  the  fifth  of  No- 
vember, after  which  the  Doctors  in  Divinity, 
and  the  Proctors,  return  to  the  Vestry,  and 
change  their  dresses. 

A  Sermon  is  then  Preached  by  a  Master 
of  a  College,  according  to  his  Seniority  of 
degree,  or  by  a  Person  of  his  appointment.6 

The  Organ  is  not  played  on  this  day. 

If  the  thirtieth  of  January  happen  to  be 
Sunday,  the  morning  and  afternoon  Sermons 

6  Who  must   be   a   Head   of  a  College,  or  a   Doctor   in 
Divinity.     See  the  Decree  Jan.  17,  1662.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  486. 

F 


82 

are  preached  as  usual,  and  the  Sermon  and 
Service  for  the  Martyrdom,  are  postponed  till 
the  next  day. 

In  the  afternoon  there  is  a  Speech  in  the 
Senate-House. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  appoints  the  Orator. 

At  one  o'clock  the  bell  begins  to  ring,  and 
at  two,  the  Vice-Chancellor  in  his  cope,  Noble- 
men, Doctors,  and  Proctors7,  meet  at  the  Vestry, 
where  the  Person,  who  is  to  make  the  Speech, 
is  in  readiness. 

The  company  go  from  thence  to  the  Senate- 
House  preceded  by  a  Bedell. 

A  Bedell  attends  the  Vice-Chancellor  to  his 
chair  at  the  West  end  of  the  Senate-House, 
and  another  goes  with  the  Speaker  to  the  Ros- 
trum. 

The  Person  who  makes  the  Speech,  receives 
from  the  Vice-Chancellor  five  guineas. 


(Examination  after  afttm0sioti 
aD  iicsptmtonfrun 


On  the  fourth  Monday  after  the  general 
Admission  ad  Respondendum  Qucsstioni  in  Janu- 
ary, there  commences  an  Examination  in  Classical 
learning,  of  such  Persons  as  shall  voluntarily  offer 
themselves  to  be  examined,  provided  that  every 

7  The  Proctors  in  Congregation  habit. 


83 


Person,  so  offering  himself,  lias  obtained  an  Honor 
at  the  Mathematical  Examination  of  the  preceding 
January. 

The  Examination  continues  four  days,  the 
hours  of  attendance  on  each  day  being  from  half- 
past  nine  o'clock  in  the  morning  till  twelve,  and 
from  one  till  four  in  the  afternoon. 

The  names  of  those  Persons,  who  have  passed 
the  Examination  with  credit,  are  arranged  in 
three  Classes,  according  to  their  respective  merits. 


#t*  on 

On  Ash- Wednesday  there  is  usually  a  Clerum 
at  St.  Mary's  at  ten  o'clock. 

The  Vice-Chan cellor  may  appoint  any  Person, 
who  is  about  to  commence  Doctor  or  Bachelor 
in  Divinity,  to  preach  this  Clerum  as  an  exercise 
for  his  degree. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine. 

If  there  be  no  Clerum,  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
Doctors  in  Divinity  in  copes,  and  the  Proctors 
in  Congregation  habit,  meet  in  the  Vestry  at 
ten  o'clock. 

In  this  case,  the  Proctors  (or  their  Deputies) 
go  into  the  Reader's  desk;  the  Senior  Proctor 
reads  part  of  the  Litany  Service  (viz.  to  the 
Lord's  Prayer)  and  the  Vice-Chancellor  reads 
the  rest  of  the  Service. 


84 


On  the  day  after  Ash- Wednesday,  at  one 
o'clock  the  bell  rings  for  the  first  Tripos. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  Noblemen,  Doctors,  and 
University  Officers,  (the  Proctors  in  Congregation 
habit)  meet  in  the  Vestry  at  two  o'clock. 

Each  of  the  Proctors  provides  a  copy  of  verses 
in  Latin,  which  he  sends  to  be  printed  at  the 
University  Press. 

The  Junior  Proctor  gives  directions  about  the 
printing,  and  orders  a  number  of  copies  to  be 
sent  to  the  Vestry,  to  be  distributed  by  the 
company  to  Persons  in  Statu  Pupillary  who 
assemble  in  the  Law  Schools  in  order  to  obtain 
them. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  Noblemen,  Doctors,  and 
University  Officers  fit  themselves  with  gloves8, 
which  are  provided  by  the  Junior  Proctor. 

A  considerable  number  of  the  Tripos  papers 
(with  the  names  and  Colleges  of  the  Wranglers 
and  Senior  Optimes  of  the  year  printed  on  the 
back)  is  brought  by  the  Proctors'  servants,  and 
distributed  amongst  the  Persons  present. 

The  whole  Company  then  go  into  the  Law 
Schools;  the  Vice-Chancellor,  Noblemen,  Doc- 

8  Gloves  are  also  given  to  the  Writers  of  the  Tripos  Verses, 
the  Marshall,  the  School-keeper,  the  Yeoman  Bedell,  the  Vice- 
rhancellor's    servant,   the   Proctors'   men,   and  the    Clerk  of 
Mary's. 


85 

tors  &c.  with  a  Bedell  into  the  Gallery;  the 
Senior  Proctor  with  another  Bedell  into  the 
Respondent's  seat.  The  Junior  Proctor  goes 
into  the  Opponent's  seat.  The  Proctors  have 
their  books  with  them. 

Each  of  the  Proctors  make  a  Speech9,  and 
the  Tripos  papers  are  thrown  amongst  the  Under- 
graduates. 

A  Bedell  reads  from  a  Tripos  paper : 
Baccalaurei  quibus  sua  reservatur  Senior  itas 
Comitiis  prioribus. 

He  then  pronounces  the  Name  and  College 
of  the  Senior  Wrangler;  to  which  the  Junior 
Proctor  answers : 

Nos  reservamus  ei  Senioritatem  suam. 

He  then  pronounces  the  name  and  College 
of  the  second  Wrangler,  to  which  the  Junior 
Proctor  answers,  et  ei. 

All  the  names  on  the  Tripos  paper  are  read 
in  the  same  manner,  and  the  Junior  Proctor 
makes  the  same  reply. 

When  this  is  finished,  the  Junior  Proctor 
says : 

Nos  continuamus  hanc  disputationem  in  horam 
primarn  diei  Jovis,  post  quartam  Dominican*  hujus 
Quadragesima. 

}  These  speeches  are  now  discontinued. 


86 

The  Candidates  for  the  Chancellor's  Medals, 
send  in  their  names  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  the 
day  after  the  first  Tripos. 

Soon  after  the  first  Tripos,  the  Examination 
for  the  Chancellor's  Medals  takes  place. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  gives  each  of  the  suc- 
cessful Candidates1  a  subject  for  a  Declamation, 
which  is  to  he  read  in  the  Law  Schools  on  the 
day  of  the  Second  Tripos. 

He  immediately  acquaints  the  Chancellor 
with  their  names,  and  writes  to  the  Engraver 
of  the  Medals. 

1  If  the  Examiners  be  equally  divided  in  opinion  on  the 
merit  of  two  Candidates,  the  Vice-Chancellor  has  the  casting 
vote,  as  appears  from  the  following  letter  from  the  Duke  of 
Newcastle,  Chancellor  of  the  University,  to  Sir  James  Bur- 
rough,  Vice- Chancellor : 

"  Claremont,  March  15,  1760. 
"  DEAR  SIR, 

"  I  have  the  favour  of  your  letter  of  the 
12th  instant,  and  am  very  clearly  of  opinion  that,  when 
there  is  an  equality  of  voices  in  the  disposal  of  the  Medal, 
the  casting  voice  ought  to  be  in  the  Vice- Chancellor,  and 
I  should  desire  it  might  always  be  so  determined. 

"  I  am,  with  great  respect, 

"  Dear  Sir, 
"  Your  most  obedient  humble  Servant, 

HOLLES  NEWCASTLE." 
From  the  original  in  the  Pice- Chancellor's  Chest. 


8? 


Iflttrlrnt 


On  Midlent  Sunday2  the  Vice-Chancellor,  or 
a  Preacher  of  his  appointment,  preaches  a  Sermon 
at  Bur  well. 

The  University  Marshall  distributes  the  fol- 
lowing sums  at  the  expence  of  the  University: 

'£.    s.     d. 

The   Church-  Wardens  for  the  Poor  .  .  0  13  4 

Ditto  for  ditto  ............  5  5  O 

Tenant's  Servants  ..........  0  10  6 

Helper  in  the  Stable  ........  0  1  0 

Vicar's  Servants  ...........  0  2  6 

Clerk  of  the  Parish  ........  0  10  6 

Ringers  ................  0  10  6 

Singers  ................  0  10  6 


£.8       3     10 


If  a  Candidate  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Divinity  is  appointed  by  the  Vice-Chancellor 
to  preach  this  Sermon,  it  is  considered  as  an 
exercise  for  his  degree. 


1809.  Mar.  17. 

2  Cum  Procancellarius  vester  Burwellce  concionari  in  Quad- 
ragesima media,  vel  die  Parascevis,  Senatus  consulto  jam 
teneatur: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  in  posterum  sufficiat,  si  ipse  aliquo  uniut- 
cujusque  anni  die,  dum  sit  dies  Dominions,  ibi  concionetur. 


In  the  third  or  fourth  week  in  Lent,  the 
Judges  arrive  to  hold  the  Assizes. 

The  Heads  of  Colleges,  and  the  Proctors3, 
meet  in  the  evening  (usually  at  seven  o'clock) 
at  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Lodge,  and,  as  soon  as 
they  have  notice  from  one  of  the  Bedells,  that 
the  Judges  are  ready  to  receive  them,  they  go 
to  the  Lodge  at  Trinity  College. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  presents  each  of  the 
Judges  with  twelve  pairs  of  gloves ;  and  the 
time,  for  the  Sermon  to  be  preached  at  St.  Mary's 
the  next  morning,  is  then  agreed  on,  which  is 
usually  eleven  o'clock. 

The  Preacher  is  appointed  by  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, and  paid  by  the  University. 

After  the  Sermon,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  Proc- 
tors, &c.  go  to  the  Shire-Hall. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  sits  on  the  right-hand 
of  the  Judge,  and  always  remains  till  the  Charge 
to  the  Grand  Jury  has  been  delivered. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  Noblemen  in  their  robes, 
Heads  of  Colleges,  the  Proctors,  and  the  Preacher, 
dine  with  the  Judges  by  invitation. 

During  the  time  of  the  Assizes  one  of  the 
Proctors  usually  attends  in  each  Court. 

3  With  their  hoods  squared. 


89 


The  second  Tripos  is  on  the  Thursday  after 
Midlent  Sunday. 

Each  of  the  Moderators  provides  a  copy  of 
Latin  verses ;  and,  in  a  habit  similar  to  the  Proc- 
tors' Congregation  habit,  and  with  their  books, 
meets  the  Vice- Chancellor,  &c.  at  St.  Mary's,  at 
two  o'clock. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  one. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  Doctors  and  Officers  fit 
themselves  with  gloves. 

The  Tripos  papers  (with  the  names  and  Col- 
leges of  the  Junior  Optimes  of  the  year  on  the 
back)  are  distributed  amongst  the  company,  who 
go  to  the  Law  Schools,  and  throw  them  to  the 
Undergraduates. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  &c.  preceded  by  a  Bedell, 
go  into  the  gallery;  the  Senior  Moderator  goes 
with  a  Bedell  into  the  Respondent's  seat,  and  the 
Junior  into  the  Opponent's  seat.  They  have  the 
Proctors'  books  with  them.  Each  Moderator 
makes  a  speech4. 

The  Bedell  reads  from  the  Tripos  paper : 

Baccalaurei  quibus  sua  reservatur  Senioritas 
Comitiis  posterioribus. 

*  These  speeches  are  now  discontinued. 


90 


He  reads  the  name  and  College  of  the  first 
Bachelor,  and  the  Junior  Moderator  answers  : 
reservamus  ei  Senioritatem  suam. 


To  the  second,  the  Junior  Moderator  answers, 
et  ei,  and  so  on,  as  in  the  first  Tripos. 

When  the  last  name  has  been  read,  he  says  : 

Et  ei;  reliqui  petant  Senioritatem  suam  a 
Registro. 

And  lastly  :  Authoritate  quafungimur,  decer- 
nimus,  creamus,  et  pronunciamus,  omnes  hujus 
anni  Deter  minatores,  finaliter  determinasse,  et 
actualiter  esse  in  Artibus  Baccalaureos. 

The  Medallists  usually  read  their  Declama- 
tions, immediately  after  the  second  Tripos  is 
finished. 


n  &rta,  on  tyt  m*    after 


On  the  Friday  morning  following  the  second 
Tripos,  the  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine  o'clock,  for 
a  Congregation  ex  statute. 

The  Caput  is  called,  and  the  several  Fathers 
deliver  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  the  supplicats  of 
all  those  whose  graces  have  passed  in  their  re- 
spective Colleges  for  Inceptors  in  Arts. 

Graces  of  Inceptors  (being  Fellows  of  King's  ) 
are  not  presented  to  the  Caput,  but  merely  shewn 


91 

to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  read  in  the  Regent 
House  only. 

They  are  admitted  to  their  degree  at  the  same 
Congregation. 

The  Registrary  having  shewed  to  the  Caput, 
that  each  Inceptor  has  subscribed  to  the  36th 
Canon,  the  Vice-Chancellor  reads  the  supplicats, 
and  writes  Ad.  on  all  that  are  approved. 

The  Bedell  takes  them  into  the  Non-Regent 
House,  where  they  are  read  by  the  Senior  Scru- 
tator; and  then  into  the  Regent  House,  where 
they  are  read  by  the  Senior  Proctor. 

If  there  be  no  other  business,  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor continues  the  Congregation  to  one  o'clock 
of  the  same  day. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  one,  and  the  Senate 
meet  at  two. 

Previously  to  the  second  Congregation,  the 
Bedells  have  written  the  Names  and  Colleges  of 
all  the  Inceptors  on  a  sheet  of  paper,  and  against 
every  one, 

(  placet 

I  non  placet .  .  . 

At  the  bottom  of  the  paper  is  written, 

(  placent 

omnes  \ 

I  non  placent.  .  . 


92 

At  the  second  Congregation  the  Supplicats  are 
carried  to  the  Scrutators,  to  be  read  a  second  time 
in  the  Non-Regent  House. 

When  all  have  been  read,  a  Bedell  calls  ad 
Scrutinium. 

If  all  be  approved,  the  two  Scrutators  and 
another  Non-Regent  mark  the  affirmative  line 
against  the  word  placent,  whilst  the  Bedell  calls 
at  intervals,  Ad  Scrutinium  secundo  —  Ad  Scru- 
tinium ultimo  —  cessatum  est  a  Scrutinio. 

The  Senior  Scrutator  then  says,  omnes  placent. 

But  if  any  Supplicat  be  objected  to,  by  one 
or  more  Persons  saying  non  placet  when  that 
Supplicat  is  read,  the  Scrutators  must  take  the 
votes  by  placet  and  non  placet. 

If  the  non  placets  be  greater  than,  or  equal 
to,  the  placets  in  number,  the  Supplicat  is  lost ; 
and  the  Senior  Scrutator  says,  A.  non  placet; 
reliqui  placent. 

If  more  than  one  Person's  Supplicat  be  ob- 
jected to,  the  votes  for  each,  to  which  an  objection 
is  made,  must  be  taken  in  the  same  manner. 

The  Bedell  takes  the  Supplicats  to  be  read 
in  the  Regent  House  by  the  Senior  Proctor ;  and 
they  are  put  to  the  vote  precisely  in  the  same 
manner  as  in  the  Non-Regent  House,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  the  two  Proctors  standing  in 
Scrutiny. 

The  Senior  Proctor  (the  Junior  standing  by 
him)  pronounces  the  Scrutiny  by  saying  omnes 


93 

placent^  or  (if  any  one  have  been  rejected)  A.  non 
placet;  reliqui  placent. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  then  dissolves  the  Con- 
gregation. 

The  Inceptors,  whose  Supplicats  have  passed, 
follow  the  Vice-Chancellor  to  his  Lodge,  in  Ba- 
chelors' gowns  and  hoods,  and  ask  leave  to  pro- 
ceed 5. 

They  also  visit6  the  Caput,  and  all  Doctors 
and  Regents,  before  the  Congregation  in  which 
they  are  to  be  admitted. 


of 


in 


The  Congregation  for  this  purpose  is  on  the 
Friday  following  at  ten  o'clock. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine. 

The  Bedells  have  prepared  a  Scrutiny  paper 
in  the  following  form  : 


SCIO  .  . 

A.  -j  credo . 
v  nescio. 


fSCIO  .  . 

B.  <  credo . 
v  nescio 


&c. 


&c. 


5  Leave  to  proceed  is  now  asked  of  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
as  he  quits  the  Senate- House. 

0  This  is  now  discontinued. 


94 

At  the  bottom  is  written, 

r  scio  ..... 

omnes  <  credo .... 

v.  nescio .... 


As  soon  as  the  Senate  is  assembled,  the  Proc- 
tors go  to  their  place,  and  the  Senior  reads  from 
a  paper  prepared  by  the  Registrary, 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  omnes  Inceptores,  quibus 
Gratia  a  vobis  nuper  concessa  fuit  ad  visitandum, 
bona  vestra  cum  venia,  intrent. 

When  this  is  granted,  a  Bedell  desires  the 
Fathers  to  assemble  their  respective  Sons,  who 
have  previously  received  copies  of  their  Admission 
Oath  from  the  School-keeper,  and  have  put  on 
the  Bachelor's  hood  over  the  Bachelor's  gown. 

The  Senior  Father,  following  the  Bedell,  pre- 
sents four  or  five  of  his  Sons  at  a  time  (holding 
their  right  hands  in  his  own)  to  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor sitting  in  the  chair,  in  these  words : 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie, 
et  tota  Universitas,  prasento  vobis  hos  Viros,  quos 
scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doctrind  esse  idoneos  ad 
incipiendum  in  Artibus ;  idque  Tib?  fide  mea 
prcesto,  totique  Academic. 

The  rest  of  the  Fathers,  according  to  their 
Seniority,  present  their  Sons,  in  the  same  form ; 
and  as  they  are  presented  they  go  to  the  South 
side  of  the  Senate-House.  When  all  are  pre- 
sented, they  take  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and 
Supremacy,  and  the  Oath  of  Admission  is  ad- 
ministered to  them  by  the  Senior  Proctor. 


95 

Jurdbis,  quod  nihil  ex  Us  omnibus  sciens  volens 
prcetermisisti,  quce  per  leges  aut  probatas  con* 
suetudines  hujus  Academice  ad  hunc  Gradum 
quern  ambis  adipiscendum,  aut  peragenda  aut 
persolvenda  requiruntur ;  nisi  quatenus  per  Gra- 
tiam  ab  Academid  concessam  tecum  dispensation 
fuerit. 

Jurabis  etiam,  quod  Cancellario  et  Procan- 
cellario  nostro  comiter  obtemperabis :  et  quod 
statuta  nostra,  ordinationes,  et  consuetudines  ap- 
probatas  observabis. 

Denique  jurabis,  quod  compositionem  inter 
Academiam  et  Collegium  Regale  factam  sciens 
volens  non  violalns :  Et  quod  in  Bibliothecam 
publicam  et  Museum  Honoratissimi  Domini  Vice- 
Comitis  Fitzwilliam  admissus,  jure  isto  tuo  ita 
uteris,  ut,  quantum  in  te  est,  nihil  inde  detrimental 
capiat  vel  Bibliotheca,  vel  Museum  prcedictum: 
in  hcec  autem  verba  jurabis,  secundum  tenorem 
Senatus-consulti  in  cautelam  jurantium  jacti1. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia. 

3  Jul  1647- 

7  Placet  Vobis,  ut  in  majorem  in  posterum  cautelam  juran- 
tium et  levamen,  hcec  verba  sint  annexa  juramentis  Academics 
Matricitlationis,  Admissionis,  Creationis : 

"  Senatus  Cantabrigiensis  decrevit  et  declaravit  eos  omnes, 
"  qui  monitwnibus,  correctionibus,  mulctis,  et  pcenis  statutorum, 
"  legum,  decretorum,  ordinationum,  injunctionum,  et  laudabilium 
"  consuetudinum  hujus  Academics  transgressoribus  quovis  modo 
"  incumbentibus  humiliter  se  submiserint,  nee  esse  nee  habendos 
"  esse  perjurii  reos." 

Et  ut  hcec  vestra  concessio  pro  Statuto  habeatur,  et  infra 
decem  dies  in  libris  Procuratorum  inxcribatw. 


96 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors  then  stand 
in  scrutiny  of 


SCIO 

credo.  .  .  . 
nescio.  .  .  . 


and  if  the  Scrutators  be  unanimous  in  approving 
all  the  Candidates,  they  mark  either  the  scio  or 
credo  line. 

Then  one  of  the  Bedells  precedes  the  Candi- 
dates round  the  chair,  and  in  passing  they  bow 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors. 

The  Bedell  calls  the  name  of  each  Inceptor. 

The  Inceptor  then  kneels  down  before  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  who,  taking  both  his  hands 
between  his  own,  admits  him  in  the  following 
words : 

Auihoritate  mihi  commissd,  admitto  te  ad 
incipiendum  in  Artibus,  in  nomine  Patris,  et 
Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 

If  there  be  any  Candidates  for  the  degree 
of  Master  of  Arts,  who  were  of  sufficient  standing 
to  have  taken  their  degree  before  the  incepting 
day,  they  are  to  be  admitted  at  the  second  Con- 
gregation, observing  the  same  forms  as  the  In- 
ceptors. 


97 


tlrrtuoii* 

Of  all  Persons,  who  take  the  Degree  of  BACHELOR 
of  ARTS,  BACHELOR  of  LAW,  or  BACHELOR 
of  MEDICINE. 

This  Examination  takes  place  in  the  Senate- 
House  in  the  last  week  of  the  Lent  Term. 

It  continues  for  four  days. 

The  subjects  of  Examination  are  one  of 
the  four  Gospels  or  the  Acts  of  the  Apostles 
in  the  original  Greek,  Paley's  Evidences  of 
Christianity,  one  of  the  Greek,  and  one  of  the 
Latin  Classics. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  the  King's  Professors 
of  Divinity,  Civil  Law,  Physic,  and  Greek, 
and  the  Public  Orator,  (provided  that  not  more 
than  two  of  them  are  Members  of  the  same 
College,)  appoint  the  particular  subject  in  the 
New  Testament,  also  the  Classical  Authors,  and 
the  portion  of  their  works,  which  it  may  be 
expedient  to  select. 

Public  notice  of  the  Subjects  of  Examination 
are  issued  in  the  first  week  of  the  Lent  Term 
in  the  preceding  year. 

In  case  three  or  more  of  those  to  whom  the 
appointment  of  the  subjects  of  Examination  has 
been  assigned,  shall  belong  to  the  same  College, 
Deputies  for  any  such  number  exceeding  two  are 

G 


98 

' 

to   be   appointed,  every   year,   by   Grace    of  the 
Senate. 

Every  Person,  when  examined,  shall  be  re- 
quired to  construe  some  portion  of  each  of  the 
subjects  so  to  be  appointed — to  explain  the 
grammatical  construction  of  particular  passages  - 
and  to  answer  printed  questions  relating  to  the 
Evidences  of  Christianity,  and  to  the  Geography, 
Chronology,  and  History  of  the  other  subjects 
of  Examination. 

Every  Undergraduate  is  required  to  attend 
the  Examination  in  the  second  Lent  Term  after 
he  comes  into  residence. 

In  case  any  one  be  prevented  by  illness 
(a  Certificate  of  which  shall  be  submitted  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors  for  the  time  being, 
for  their  approbation)  from  attending  the  regular 
Examination  of  his  year,  he  shall  be  required 
to  attend  the  next  following  Examination,  and 
so  on :  and  if  any  one  absent  himself,  upon  any 
other  account,  from  the  proper  Examination  of 
his  year,  he  is  not  allowed  the  term  in  which 
the  Examination  takes  place,  and  is  moreover, 
required  to  attend  the  Examination  of  the  next 
year,  and  so  on. 

Two  Classes,  each  of  them  arranged  alpha- 
betically, are  formed  out  of  those  examined  — 
the  first  consisting  of  those  who  have  passed  their 
Examinations  with  credit — and  the  second,  of 
those  to  whom  the  Examiners  have  only  not 
refused  their  Certificate  of  Approval 


99 

Those  who  are  not  approved  by  the  Ex- 
aminers, are  required  to  attend  the  Exami- 
nation of  the  following  year,  and  so  on :  and 
no  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  Bachelor  of 
Civil  Law,  or  Bachelor  of  Medicine,  is  granted, 
unless  a  Certificate  be  presented  to  the  Caput, 
shewing  that  the  Candidate  for  such  degree 
has  passed,  to  the  satisfaction  of  the  Examiners, 
one  of  these  Examinations. 


matriculation. 

On  the  Day  after  the  Division  of  Lent  Term, 
there  is  a  Matriculation  in  the  Senate-House. 
For  the  proceedings,  see  ante  p.  61. 

Wfyt  C£n&  of  ilent  STerm* 

This  being  the  last  day  of  the  Term,  a  Bedell 
calls  up  the  Houses. 

The  Vice-Chancellor8  reads  the  Service  ap- 
pointed (Lib.  Stat.  p.  546.)  and  dissolves  the 
Congregation  together  with  the  Term  ad  unde- 
cimum  diem  post  Pascha. 


On  the  25th  of  March,  being  the  Foundation 
day  at  King's  College,  the  Vice-Chancellor  and 
other  Members  of  the  University,  go  in  the 
morning  to  King's  Chapel  to  hear  a  Sermon. 

8  He  reads  this  Service  although  he  be  not  in  Orders. 


100 

The  Proctors  wear  their  hoods  squared,  and 
have  their  books  and  servants. 

The  Provost  usually  sends  an  invitation  to 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  Noblemen,  Heads  of  Houses, 
and  Proctors,  to  meet  at  'his  Lodge  at  eleven 
o'clock.  From  thence  they  go  to  the  Chapel, 
where  a  Sermon  is  preached  by  one  of  the 
Society. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  sits  in  the  Provost's  stall, 
the  Provost  on  his  right  hand. 

The  Noblemen,  Doctors,  Proctors,  Masters 
of  Arts,  &c.  sit  in  the  upper  stalls  ;  the  Bachelors 
and  Undergraduates  on  forms  below. 

In  the  afternoon,  at  two  o'clock,  a  Sermon 
is  preached  at  St.  Mary's,  by  one  appointed 
in  his  turn  in  the  Combination  paper. 


The  University  Audit  usually  takes  place 
about  this  time. 

The  late  Vice-Chancellor,  the  late  Proctors, 
the  Auditors,  the  Registrary,  and  the  Bedells, 
dine  with  the  Vice-Chancellor  after  the  Audit. 


On  Easter  Sunday  there  is  no  morning  Service 
at  St.  Mary's. 

In   the  afternoon  there  is  a   Sermon  at   two 
o'clock  . 


ioi 

The  Noblemen  wear  their  proper  habits ;  the 
Doctors  their  Scarlet  gowns,  and  the  Proctors 
their  hoods  squared. 

After  the  Sermon  an  Anthem  is  sung. 


Sermon  at  S>t  IfonrtHcf* 

On  Tuesday  in  Easter  week  the  University 
Sermon  is  preached  at  St.  Benedict's  Church,  by 
the  person  appointed  for  that  day  in  the  Combina- 
tion paper. 

Before  the  Sermon,  the  Preacher  reads,  from 
a  paper  given  him  by  the  Bedell: 

"  John  Mere,  Esquire  Bedell,  long  since  of 
this  University,  gave  to  the  Chancellor,  Masters, 
and  Scholars,  a  tenement '9  situate  in  this  parish; 
in  consideration  whereof  tlie  Sermon  is  here  this 
day.  He  left  a  small  remembrance  to  the  Officers 
of  the  University,  provided  that  they  were  present 
at  this  Commemoration;  and  was  also  not  un- 
mindful of  the  Poor  in  the  Castle,  Tolbooth,  and 
Spital-house" 

After  the  Sermon,  the  Bedell  distributes  the 
following  sums  to  the  Persons  present : 

9  This  Tenement  is  the  house  at  present  inhabited  by  the 
Margaret  Professor  of  Divinity,  for  which  he  pays  the  Uni- 
versity a  rent  of  three  pounds  per  annum,  and  the  University 
pays  to  the  Dean  and  Chapter  of  Ely  a  pension  of  three 
shillings  per  annum. 


102 

£.  6'.  d. 

Vice-Chancellor 0  0  6 

Preacher 0  3  4 

Proctors,  4d.  each 0  0  8 

Orator 0  0  4 

Scrutators,  Ad.  each 0  0  8 

Taxors,  4d.  each 0  0  8 

Librarian 0  0  4 

Curate 0  0  4 

Registrary 0  0  4 

Bedells;  4d.  each 0  1  0 

Clerk O  0  4 

Castle,  Tolbooth,  and  Spital 0  3  O 

0116 


On  Thursday  in  Easter  week,  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor attends  the  Examination  of  the  Scholars 
on  Mr.  Rustat's  Foundation  at  Jesus  College, 
and  dines  there. 


of  Mlrigtjts  antr 

The  sealing  is  generally  in  the  Law  Schools. 

The  time  for  holding  it  is  settled  by  the 
Taxors  and  Registrary.  It  seems  most  regular 
to  hold  it  before  the  Court  Leet  is  held. 

A  short  time  before  the  sealing,  notice  is 
given  by  a  Proclamation  prepared  by  the  Regis- 
trary, and  carried  by  the  Yeoman  Bedell  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor  for  his  signature. 


103 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  gives  notice  in  the  several 
parts  of  the  Town,  two  or  three  days  before  the 
sealing. 

Notice  should  also  be  given  in  Barnwell  and 
Chesterton. 

The  Senior  Taxor  provides  a  stamp  for  sealing 
with.  It  has  the  initial  letters  of  the  surname 
of  each  Taxor. 

On  the  first  day,  Weights,  Wine  Measures, 
and  Yard-W^ands,  are  tried.  The  Yeoman 
Bedell,  and  the  Taxors'  men,  are  to  have  the 
standard  Weights  and  Measures  ready  in  the 
Schools.  A  hammer,  a  wedge,  and  adze,  are 
used  for  breaking  the  deficient  Weights  and 
Measures. 

The  Taxors,  and  the  Registrary,  meet  in  the 
Schools,  at  the  time  appointed  in  the  proclama- 
tion. The  Weights  and  Measures  which  are 
found  to  be  deficient  are  broken,  and  the  good 
ones  are  sealed. 

The  Registrary  notes  the  Weights  and  Mea- 
sures of  each  Person,  distinguishing  the  large 
from  the  small  ones,  and  noting  the  sums  due. 

On  the  second  day  of  sealing,  the  Yeoman 
Bedell,  the  Taxors'  servants,  and  the  University 
Gager  attend. 

Ale  and  Milk  Measures1,  Bushels,  Pecks, 
half  Pecks,  and  Quarterns,  are  tried. 

1  The  Measures  of  Inn-holders,  and  Milk-sellers  are  jiarti- 
cularly  mentioned  in  the  Proclamation. 


104 

The  servants  measure  the  wet  Measures,  and 
the  Gager  the  dry;  the  Registrary  taking  the 
account,  as  on  the  preceding  day. 

The  deficient  Measures  are  broken. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  has  five  shillings  for 
each  day's  attendance;  each  of  the  Taxors'  ser- 
vants, eighteen  pence;  the  Gager  half  a  crown. 


iftourt 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  has  orders  from  the 
Deputy  High  Steward,  and  the  Taxors,  to 
summon  the  Jurymen. 

Thirty  Jurymen  2  are  appointed,  viz.  two  for 
each  Parish,  including  Barnwell  and  Chesterton. 

The  Senior  Taxor  usually  appoints  the  fore- 
man. If  the  Taxors  do  not  interfere,  the  rest 
of  the  Jurymen  are  fixed  upon  by  the  Yeoman 
Bedell,  by  whom  they  are  summoned.  This  is 
done  some  days  before  the  Court  is  held. 

At  the  first  Court  the  Deputy  High  Steward 
and  the  two  Taxors  attend. 

The  Taxors  have  their  hoods  squared. 

The  Jurymen  are  sworn  by  the  Clerk  of 
the  Court.  The  Steward  gives  his  charge,  and 
the  Court  is  adjourned  to  a  time  and  place 
mentioned. 


'I'h  is  number  does  not  seem  to  be  necessary,  though  it  is 
i  lie  ii-ual  one. 


105 

On  the  second  Court  day,  the  Foreman  delivers 
the  presentments,  reduced  to  form  in  a  book 
(after  they  have  been  given  in  separately)  and 
signed  by  the  Jurymen  of  the  Parishes.  The 
presentments  have  of  late  years  been  confined 
to  unsealed  wine  Measures  and  gaming  places. 
After  the  presentments  there  is  written ;  The 
contents  of  the  foregoing^  we  give  in  as  our 
presentments  upon  Oath. 

The  Foreman,  and  the  rest  of  the  Jurymen, 
sign  the  above  declaration. 

The  two  Aifeerers  sign  the  undermentioned 
form : 

"  We  affeer  the  within  named  several  Persons 
in  the  several  sums  set  against  their  respective 
names,  and  confirm  this  amerciament: 

(A.B. 

Ajfeerers 


The  Deputy  Steward's  warrant  for  the  Yeoman 
Bedell  to  collect  the  fines,  signed  and  sealed 
by  him,  is  added. 

The  Deputy  Steward  receives  four  pounds 
of  the  Vice-Chancellor. 


106 

The  Taxors  pay  the  Foreman's  bill  as  follows : 

£.  s.  d. 

Foreman  of  the  Leet  .  .  . I  1  0 

Thirty  Jurymen,  each  55 7  10  0 

Two  Affeerers,  each  55 0  10  0 

Taxors'  servants,  each  10s 1  0  0 

Clerk  of  the  Court 0  10  6 

Yeoman  Bedell  for  summoning) 

T                                                        >  .  »  •       U  D  w 

the  Jury ) 

The  Taxor's  gratuity 0  10  6 

£.  U  7  0 


The  Yeoman  Bedell  is  paid  for  his  attendance 
at  the  Leet,  &c.  £2.  13*.  kd. 

On  the  same  day  the  Taxors  give  a  dinner 
to  the  Steward,  &c. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell,  by  order  of  the  Taxors, 
gives  notice  to  the  Persons  concerned,  of  the 
time  when,  and  the  place  where,  the  fines  are 
to  be  paid. 

The  Taxors  attend  at  the  time  and  places 
mentioned. 

The  payments  are  made  at  a  Tavern,  and 
each  Person  is  usually  offered  a  glass  of  wine. 

See  Mr.  Mansfield's  opinions  concerning  several 
questions  put  to  him  respecting  Sealings,  &c. 


107 


tfirnim  on  tfjr  Dap  licforr  (Paster  Cerm 
fcegin*. 


I  On  Tuesday  sen'night  after  Easter  Day  (being 
the  day  before  Easter  Term  begins)  the  Lady 
Margaret's  Preacher  (or  one  by  his  appointment) 
preaches  ad  Clerum  at  St.  Mary's. 

This  Sermon  may  be  preached  as  an  exercise 
for  the  degree  of  D.D.  or  B.D. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine  o'clock. 

The  Lady  Margaret's  Preacher,  or  the  Person 
appointed  by  him  to  preach,  is  brought3  to  the 
Vestry  by  a  Bedell. 


of  (Paater  Cerm* 

Easter  Term  begins  on  the  eleventh  day  (the 
Wednesday  sen'night)  after  Easter  day. 


The  Woodwardian  Audit  takes  place  at  the 
Vice-Chancellor's  on  the  first  of  May. 

The  Heads  of  Colleges,  the  Professor,  the 
Inspectors,  the  Bedells,  and  the  Registrary,  dine 
with  the  Vice-Chancellor  afterwards, 


3  This  is  discontinued. 


108 


<£lmun  on  tf>*  mgftty  m&$  of 


On  the  eighth  of  May,  the  Regius  Professor 
in  Divinity  (or  his  Substitute)  preaches  ad  Clerum 
at  St.  Mary's,  ad  commendationem  Eegis  Henrici 
septimi.  Stat.  Eliz.  45.  De  concionibus.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  254. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine  o'clock. 

He  may  appoint  another  Person  to  preach  the 
Clerum,  as  an  exercise  for  a  degree. 

If  the  eighth  of  May  be  on  a  Sunday,  the 
Clerum  is  preached,  and  there  is  no  English 
Sermon. 


STrtnitg 

At  St.  Mary's  Church,  on  this  day,  Noblemen 
appear  in  their  robes,  Doctors  in  the  different 
Faculties  in  their  Scarlet  gowns,  and  the  Proctors 
wear  their  hoods  squared. 


On  the  day  after  the  division  of  the  Easter 
Term,  there  is  a  Matriculation  in  the  Senate- 
House. 

For  the  proceedings  see  ante  p.  61. 


109 


on  tfte  CtDettt^ntntt)  of 

The  twenty-ninth  of  May  is  a  Litany- day  ^ 
During  the  Service  of  the  Litany,  the  Doctors 
in  Divinity  are  in  copes,  the  Proctors  in  Con- 
gregation hahit. 

The  Sermon  is  preached  by  the  same  Doctor 
in  Divinity,  who  preached  on  the  King's  Ac- 
cession (see  ante  p.  80.),  if  his  name  continue  on 
the  boards,  or  by  one  appointed  by  him. 

During  the  Sermon,  the  Doctors  are  in  Scarlet 
gowns,  the  Noblemen  in  their  robes,  and  the 
Proctors  wear  their  hoods  squared. 

After  the  Sermon  an  Anthem  is  sung. 


nomination  of  tljc  iSarnafyn 

On  the  tenth  of  June,  the  four  Barnaby  Lec- 
turers are  nominated  and  pricked ;  unless  the 
tenth  falls  on  a  Sunday,  in  which  case  it  may 
be  deferred  to  the  Monday.  See  Sir  Robert 
Redes  Grant  in  the  black  parchment  book. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Heads  of  Colleges 
(or  their  Representatives),  the  Proctors  with  their 
hoods  squared,  and  the  Scrutators,  meet  in  the 
Senate-House,  at  nine  o'clock  in  the  morning. 

The  bell  does  not  ring. 


110 

A  Bedell  reads,  from  the  black  parchment 
book,  as  much  of  Sir  Robert  Rede's  grant  as 
concerns  the  nomination  of  the  Lecturers,  which 
is  contained  in  the  following  Extract : 

"  And  after  the  Decease  of  all  the  said 
Executors  all  the  said  Readers  to  be  chosen 
after  the  laudable  Custom  and  Usage  of  the 
mid  University.  Except  and  provided  always 
that  the  same  Election  to  be  made  and  had  the 
tenth  Day  of  June,  or  within  two  days  next  after 
the  said  Day:  and  that  the  said  Readers  so 
elect  or  institute  be  of  several  Shires  and  several 
Counties  born,  and  of  suck  Scholars  as  ^hall  be 
thought  most  apt  and  able  for  the  said  Reading, 
and  most  profitable  for  the  instruction  of  the 
Scholars  coming  to  the  said  Lectures,  and  in- 
differently to  be  chosen  without  any  Partiality  or 
Favour  to  be  shewn  to  any  County  or  to  any 
particular  Scholar." 

He  reads  the  Statute  De  Nominatione  et 
Electione  Lectorum.  Stat.  Eliz.  40.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  251. 

He  reads  part  of  the  34th  Statute,  De  Nomi- 
natione et  Electione  Pro-Cancellarii,  ending  at 
the  word  declaramus.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  242. 

He  produces  a  paper  on  which  he  has  written : 
Nominati  in  annum  sequentem  sunt9 

Pro  Mathematico  Lectore  . 


Ill 

Pro  Philosophico  Lectore 1 

- 

Vo  Rhetorico  Lectore  .......  .s 

Pro  Logico  Lectore \ 

The  Proctors  and  Scrutators  are  usually  al- 
lowed to  name  the  Lecturers. 

The  Senior  Proctor  nominates4  two  for  the 
Mathematical  Lecture ;  the  Junior  Proctor  two 
for  the  Philosophical ;  the  Senior  Scrutator  two 
for  the  Rhetorical ;  and  the  Junior  Scrutator  two 
for  the  Logical. 

Each  places  that  Person's  name  first  whom  he 
wishes  to  have  appointed. 

A  Bedell  reads  the  nominati,  and  draws  lines 
opposite  to  each  Person's  name. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Senior 
Doctors  present,  stand  in  Scrutiny ;  and  the 
Heads  of  Colleges,  (or  their  Representatives) 
prick  according  to  Juniority. 

The  Bedell  reads  from  the  paper  on  which 
the  Lecturers  have  been  nominated  and  pricked : 

4  If  the  Proctors  or   Scrutators,    (or  either  of  them)  be 
absent,'  the  Vice-Chancellor  usually  nominates  in  their  stead. 


112 

Nominati  et  punctis  notati  in  annum  sequen- 
tem  suntt 

T  (Mr.  A,.  Coll. 

Pro  Matltematico  Lector e  ...-],,    ^    „  J7 

(  Mr.  B.  Coll. 

(Mr.C.  Coll. 

Pro  Philosophico  Lector  e  .  .  .  1  _  _    _    ^  77 

1  Mr.  D.  Coll. 

cMr.  E.  Coll. 

Pro  Rhetonco  Lectore J  _  _    _    „  77 

(  Mr.  F.  Coll. 

(Mr.  G.  Coll. 

Pro  Logico  Lectore -{  ,  _    TT    _,  __ 

(  Mr.  H.  Coll. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  gives  this  paper  to  the 
Senior  Proctor,  to  be  published  at  the  beginning 
of  the  next  Congregation. 


Election  of  tfte  iSarnattp 

The  Congregation  must  be  at  ten  o'clock  in 
the  morning  of  the  eleventh  or  twelfth  of  June5: 
but  it  is  usually  on  the  eleventh. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine. 

The  Senate  being  assembled,  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor takes  the  chair,  and  a  Bedell  calls  up  the 
Houses. 

The  Senior  Proctor  reads  that  part  of  Sir 
Robert  Rede's  Grant  which  the  Bedell  read  at 

5  The  Grant  says,  that  the  Election  shall  be  on  the  10th 
of  June,  or  within  the  two  following  days. 


113 

the  former  Congregation,  and  the  40th  Statute, 
De  Nominatione  et  Electione  Lectorum.  He 
also  reads  a  part  of  the  34th  Statute,  beginning 
at  Electio  autem,  and  publishes  the  Nominati, 
&c. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Proctors 
stand  in  Scrutiny,  and  the  Bedell  calls,  Ad  Scru- 
tinium pro  Electione  Pr&lectoris  Mathematici. 
The  votes  are  brought  up  in  this  form: 

A.  B.  digit  Mr.  C.  D.  in  Prcelectorem  Ma- 
thematicum  in  annum  sequentem. 

The  Bedell  calls,  at  intervals,  ad  Scrutinium 
secundo  —  ad  Scrutinium  ultimo  —  cessatum  est 
ti  Scrutinio. 

The  votes  are  given  to  the  Senior  Proctor, 
who  reads  them  as  in  other  Elections,  and  declares 
the  Election  in  the  following  words: 

Ego  A.  B.  Senior  Procurator  hujus  Acade- 
mic, (eligo,  et)  a  vobis  electum  pronuncio,  Ma- 
gistrum  C.  D.  in  Prtelectorem  Matkematicum,  in 
annum  sequentem. 

The  other  Lecturers6  are  then  elected,  se- 
parately, in  the  same  manner,  and  their  Election 
declared  in  the  same  form. 


6  The  above  are  called  in  our  Statutes  (f  Lector es  ordi- 
narii"  and  formerly  gave  the  "  Lectiones  or  dinar ias,"  men- 
tioned in  the  Supplicat  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 

The  Mathematical  Lecturer  is  paid  by  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor:  the  other  three  Lecturers  are  paid  by  the  Bursar  of 
Jesus  College. 

H 


114 


of  13»  13  on  tfjc  <&letontt)7  of  !5uur. 

The  Elections  of  the  Barnaby  Lecturers  being 
finished,  the  Caput  is  called  to  examine  the  Sup- 
plicats  for  Bachelors  in  Divinity. 

After  they  have  passed  the  Caput,  and  been 
read  in  both  Houses,  the  Vice-Chancellor  con- 
tinues the  Congregation  to  one  o'clock  in  the 
afternoon. 

The  Candidates  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  in 
Divinity,  follow  the  Vice-Chancellor  to  his  Lodge, 
in  the  habit  of  a  Non-Regent,  to  ask  leave  to 
proceed8;  after  which  they  visit9  the  other  Mem« 
bers  of  the  Caput,  the  Heads  of  Colleges,  and  all 
the  Doctors  in  Divinity. 

In  the  afternoon  the  bell  begins  to  ring  at 
one  o'clock,  and  the  Senate  assembles  at  two. 

The  Supplicats  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  in 
Divinity  are  read  in  both  Houses,  and  passed 

by  the  Scrutiny  of    J  Placet:  ' 

I  non  placet . . 

7  Though  the  eleventh  fall  on  a  Sunday,  the  Congregations 
for  the  degree  of  B.I),  and  the  Election  of  Barnaby  Lecturers 
are  not  deferred  on  that  account,  though  it  is  not  usual  to 
transact  other  business. 

8  This  leave  is  now  asked  of  the  Vice-Chancellor  as  he 
is  quitting  the  Senate-House. 

*  The  practice  of  visiting  the  Caput,  &c.  is  now  discon- 
tinued. 


115 

Tfre  Proctors  then  go  into  the  Non- Regent 
House,  with  their  books,  and  sit  together  on  a 
bench,  at  the  upper  end  of  the  House. 

A  Bedell,  having  directed  all  the  Candidates 
to  be  in  readiness,  and  arranged  them  according 
to  a  list  given  him  by  the  Regius  Professor  of 
Divinity,  precedes  the  Professor,  in  his  cope,  into 
the  Non-Regent  House. 

The  Professor  preceded  by  the  Bedell,  goes 
with  his  Sons  to  the  Proctors,  to  whom  he  presents 
them  in  these  words : 

Dignissimi  Domini  Procuratores,  et  fata  Uni- 

versitas ;  Prcesento  vobis  Reverendos  hosce  Viros, 

quos  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doctrina,  esse  idoneos 

ad  opponendum  in  Sacra  Theologia ;  idque  Vobis 

fide  mea  prcesto,  totique  Academics. 

When  are  all  presented,  each  Person  kneels 
down  before  the  Senior  Proctor,  who,  taking  his 
hands  between  his  own,  says : 

Authoritate  nobis  commissa,  nos  admittimus  te 
ad  opponendum  in  Sacra  Theologia,  in  nomine 
Patris,  et  Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 

The  Professor,  preceded  by  a  Bedell,  goes  to 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  presents  them  in  the 
following  words : 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie, 
et  tota  Universitas ;  Prcesento  vobis  hosce  Viros, 
quos  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doctrina,  esse 
idoneos  ad  intrandum  in  Sacra  Theologia ;  idque 
Tibi  fide  mea  prcesto,  totique  Academic?. 

H  2 


116 

When  the  Professor  has  presented  them  all, 
he  takes  his  place  among  the  Doctors. 

One  of  the  Candidates  then  takes  the  Oaths 
of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and  the  Senior 
Proctor  administers  to  him  the  same  Oath,  which 
is  taken  by  Persons  to  be  admitted  to  the  degree 
of  Master  of  Arts,  of  which  the  School-keeper  has 
given  each  of  them  a  copy. 

The  rest  of  them  are  then  sworn  by  the  Senior 
Proctor,  four  or  five  at  a  time,  in  the  following 
words : 

Eadem  Juramenta,  quce  prcestitit  A.  B.  in 
sud  Persona,  vos  quoque  prcestabitis  in  vestris 


Ita  vos  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evan- 
gelia. 

The   Vice-Chancellor   and   the   two    Proctors 
go  to  the  table,  and  stand  in  scrutiny  of 


f  SCIO 

<  credo .... 


nescio 


The  Bedell  goes  with  his  staff  to  the  Professor, 
who  marks  the  scio  line. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors  mark  the 
Scrutiny  in  the  usual  manner ;  the  Bedell  calling 
at  intervals,  ad  Scrutinium  secundo,  <%c. 

The  Candidates  follow  the  Bedell  round  the 
chair,  and,  in  passing,  bow  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
Professor,  &c. 


117 

The  Vice-Chancellor  takes  the  chair,  and 
admits  each  Candidate,  kneeling  before  him,  in 
these  words  : 

Authoritate  mihi  commissd,  admitto  te  ad 
enarrandum  omnes  Apostolicas  Epistolas,  in 
nomine  Patris,  et  Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 


for  a  ilribate  (Commencement 

On  or  about  the  eleventh  of  June,  the 
following  Grace  passes  for  dispensing  with  the 
proceedings  of  a  Public *  Commencement : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  creationes  omnes,  tarn  In- 
ceptorum  in  singulis  Facultatibus,  si  qui  fuerint, 
quam  Magistrorum  in  Artibus,  omnesque  ritus  eo 
spectantes,  hie  in  Senaculo  privatim,  hoc  anno, 

peragantur   diebus 2 Julii  proxime  se- 

quentis ;    et  ut,  pro   instante   hdc  vice,   Publicis 
majorum  Comitiorum  solemnitatibus  super sedeatur . 


u  in  tljr 

Concerts    are    sometimes    performed    in    the 
Senate- House. 

The  following  Grace  is  (in  that  case)  usually 
brought  in  about  this  time: 

1  No   Commencements  are  now  Public  according  to  the 
original  meaning  of  the  word. 

2  Here  insert  the  dates  of  Monday  and  Tuesday  in  Com- 
mencement week. 


118 


Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Senaculum  vestrum  Musicis 
perrnittatur  diebus  -  et  -  et  et  nt 

Magister  A.  et  Magister  B.  et  Magister  C. 
Sijndici  vestri  constituantur,  qui  caveant,  ne  quid 
detrimenti  capiat  Senaculum. 


proclamation  of  iSarnttttU  4Fair,  eomtnonip 

,dFatr. 


On  the  twenty-third  of  June,  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, (Noblemen,  and  Doctors,  if  any  of  them 
choose  to  attend)  Proctors,  Commissary,  Taxors, 
and  Registrary,  meet  in  the  Senate-House  at 
eleven  in  the  forenoon. 

They  are  invited  by  the  Proctors,  some  time 
before  the  meeting. 

The  Doctors  are  in  Scarlet  gowns,  the  Proctors 
and  Taxors  have  their  hoods  squared. 

The  School-keeper  provides  cakes  and  wine, 
by  desire  of  the  Proctors. 

When  they  have  stayed  a  little  time,  they 
go  in  coaches  ordered  by  the  Proctors,  to  proclaim 
the  Fair. 

The  Proclamation  is  read  by  the  Registrary, 
and  repeated  by  the  Yeoman  Bedell,  first  in 
the  middle  of  Barnwell,  and  a  second  time  on 
Midsummer  green,  in  the  Fair. 

If  the  twenty-third  of  June  happen  on  a 
Sunday,  the  Proclamation  is  made  on  the  Satur- 
day before. 


119 


~<uurDar>   fccforf   ttjc   tTommtntmrm. 

On  this  day  there  are  two  Congregations: 
one  at  eleven  o'clock  in  the  morning,  the  other 
at  two  in  the  afternoon. 

After  the  morning  Congregation,  two  of  the 
Exercises,  which  have  obtained  the  Prizes  given  by 
the  Members  for  the  University,  are  usually  read. 


The  Commencement  Sunday  is  the  Sunday 
immediately  preceding  the  first  Tuesday  in  July. 

It  is  a  Commemoration  day. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  appoints  the  Preachers 
for  this  day. 

They  are  usually-  Inceptors  in  Divinity,  who 
preach  in  full-sleeved  gowns,  and  black  hoods. 

The  Noblemen  wear  their  robes,  the  Doctors 
their  Scarlet  gowns ;  the  Proctors  have  their  hoods 
squared. 

The  morning  Preacher,  immediately  after  the 
Sermon,  reads  the  account  of  the  Benefactors  to 
the  University. 

There  is  an  Anthem. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  concludes  the  Service. 

All  Noblemen,  resident  in  the  University, 
the  three  Regius  Professors  of  Divinity,  Law, 


120 

and  Physic,  the  Public  Orator,  the  Noblemen, 
and  all  incepting  Doctors,  are  invited  to  dine 
with  the  Vice-Chancellor  on  this  day.  The  High 
Steward,  the  Commissary,  the  Representatives 
of  the  University,  and  all  strangers  of  distinc- 
tion, who  may  happen  to  visit  the  University 
at  this  time,  are  also  invited. 


Drfor*  t^e  (ffotmnencetnent, 


On  this  day  there  are  two  Congregations  ;  one 
at  eleven  o'clock  in  the  morning,  the  other  at 
two  in  the  afternoon. 

After  the  morning  Congregation,  the  other 
two  Exercises,  which  have  obtained  Members' 
Prizes,  are  usually  read. 


On  the  Commencement  day,  the  Doctors  in 
all  Faculties,  and  the  Masters  of  Arts,  are 
created4  by  their  respective  Fathers. 

3  It  is  very  unusual  to  confer  degrees   on  this  day.     His 
Royal  Highness  Prince  William  of  Gloucester,  was  admitted 
to  his  degree,  as  a  mark  of  particular  distinction. 

4  Jul.  5,  1773.     Cum  R.  R.  Inceptor  in   Sacra   Theologid 
Comitiis  instantibus  adesse  non  possit : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Creatio  ejus  differatur  in  Comitia  anni 
sequentis,  et  ut  reservetur  ei  Senioritas,  qua  in  instantibus 
Comitiis  ei  assignalitur. 


121 


The  bell  begins  to  ring  at  nine  o'clock. 

The  Noblemen  wear  their  robes ;  the  Doctors 
their  Scarlet  gowns. 

When  the  Professors  are  ready,  a  Bedell 
directs  the  commencing  Doctors  in  Divinity  to 
put  on  their  copes,  and  the  commencing  Doctors 
in  Law  and  Physic  to  put  on  their  robes. 

The  School-keeper  gives  printed  copies  of  the 
forms  observed  at  Creation  to  all  Commencers; 
and  to  all  the  Doctors  in  Divinity,  he  gives 
the  form  of  Profession. 

A  Bedell  arranges  the  commencing  Doctors 
according  to  the  Seniority  assigned  them  in  a  list 
given  to  him  by  the  Professors  in  the  respective 
Faculties. 

He  then  precedes  the  Professors  of  Divinity, 
Law,  and  Physic,  to  the  East  end  of  the  Senate- 
House,  where  the  commencing  Doctors  are  wait- 
ing. 

He  then  precedes  the  Professor  of  Divinity, 
with  his  Sons,  to  the  Vice-Chancellor's  chair; 
the  Professors  of  Law  and  Physic  following  with 
their  Sons. 

The  Professor  of  Divinity  then  takes  the 
chair,  his  Sons  standing  before  him  according  to 
their  Seniority,  and  the  two  Proctors  take  their 
places,  sitting  with  their  caps  on. 


The  Senior  Proctor  taking  off  his  cap,  addresses 
the  Professor  in  these  words : 

Venerande  Pater  ad  Creationem. 

The  Professor  makes  his  speech. 

The  Senior  of  the  commencing  Doctors  then 
places  himself  at  the  right  hand  of  the  Professor, 
and  turns  himself  towards  the  Senior  Proctor,  who 
says  to  him : 

Domine  Doctor  incipe :  and,  at  proper  inter- 
vals, 

Ad  Oppositum. 

Pone  dextram  manum  in  manum  Doctoris. 

Dabis  fidem  de  observando  Statuta9  Prim- 
legia,  et  Consuetudines  hujus  Academics  ap- 
probatas. 

Pone  manum  super  librum. 

4  Jurabis  de  continuatione  Regiminis  tui  in 
biennium.  Jurabis  etiam  quod  extra  hanc  Uni- 

5  If  a  Person  be  created  by  Proxy,  the  words  of  the  Oath 
are,  Jurabis  in  animam  Doctoris  B.  de  continuatione,  $c. 

If  a  Doctor  or  Master,  is  to  be  created  by  Proxy,  a  Grace, 
in  which  the  cause  of  his  absence  is  stated,  must  be  offered  to 
the  Senate ;  and  one  or  more  Persons  are  empowered  to  act  as 
Proxy,  by  a  Letter  of  Attorney. 

Jun.  11,  1802.  Cum  J.  S.  in  Artibus  Inceptor,  exteris  Re- 
gionibus  detentus,  Condtiis  proximis  adesse  nequaquam  poterit : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Creationem  suam  obtineat,  sub  Persona 
Magislri  C.  M.  vel  Magislri  T.  H.  Procuratorum  ejus  in  hac 
parte  legitirne  constitutorum. 


123 

versitatem  nusquam,  pr&terquam  Oxoniis,  in  ilia 
Facilitate  incipies,  aut  lectiones  tuas  solenniter 
resumes;  nee  consenties  ut  aliquis  alibi  in  Anglia 
incipiens  hie  pro  Doctore  in  ilia  Facilitate  ha- 
beatur. 

Determinabis  queestionem  in  aurem  Doctoris 
sedendo. 

The  Proctor  then  says,  Ad  Professionem. 

The  Doctor  reads  his  Profession  from  the 
printed  paper. 

The  Proctor  says,  Exito :  after  which  the 
Doctor  leaves  his  place. 

The  other  Doctors  in  Divinity  are  created, 
separately,  in  the  same  manner. 

The  other  Professors,  who  have  Sons,  make 
their  Speeches  and  proceed  to  Creation,  as  above ; 
except  that  the  ad  Professionem  is  not  used. 

Towards  the  close  of  the  Speeches  of  the  Pro- 
fessors, they  introduce  the  ceremonies  of  giving 
their  Sons  the  book,  &c. 

The  book  delivered  by  the  Professor  of 
Divinity  is  the  Greek  Testament :  that  delivered 
by  the  Professor  of  Law  is  Justinian's  Institutes : 
that  by  the  Professor  of  Physic  is  the  Aphorisms 
of  Hippocrates. 

If  any  Persons  are  to  be  created  Doctors  of 
Music,  they  appear  in  the  habit  of  Doctor  of 
Law. 


124 

The  following  Graces  have  been  passed  upon 
such  occasions:  • 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  A.  B.  Musices  Professor, 
bona  venia  cum  vestra  intret  ad  prcesentandum 
C.  D.  ad  incipiendum  in  Musica. 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  JVC.  W.  Musices  Professor, 
intret  in  habitu  Doctoris  in  Jure  Cimli  ad  prce- 
sentandum  A.  B.  ad  incipiendum  in  Musica. 

Cum  in  Academia  nullus  sit  in  Musica 
Doctor, 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  A.  B.  Senior  Procurator, 
istiusmodi  Doctoris  munus  pro  hac  vice  suppleat. 

The  Professor,  standing  before  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor's chair,  says  to  each  of  them : 

Authoritate    mihi    ab    Academia    commissd, 
Ego,  J.  R.  hujus  Academic  in   Musica    Pro- 
fessor,  creo,   saluto,  pronuncio   te   Doctorem   in 
scientid  Musica. 

The  Senior  Proctor  then  takes  the  Father's 
seat,  and  the  Junior  Proctor,  sitting  at  the  table, 
says: 

Honorande  Pater  ad  Creationem. 

The  Bedell  then  calls  from  the  Seniority 7  list, 
made  by  the  Proctor: 

7  The  Senior  Proctor,  who  appoints  the  Seniority  of  the 
Masters,  writes  it  thus,  Or  do  Senioritatis  Magistrorum  in  Ar- 
tibus,  Comitiis  18 — :  then  the  Christian  (in  Latin)  and  Sir- 
name,  and  the  College  of  each  Master  of  Arts,  in  the  order 
he  chuses  to  arrange  them.  He  signs  the  list,  and  delivers 
it  to  one  of  the  Bedells. 


125 

Magister  A.8  Cottegii—— 

The  Proctor  reads  on,  Pone,  dextram  manum 
in  manum  Magistri. 

Dabisfidem  de  observando  Statuta,  Privilegia, 
et  Consuetudines  hujus  Universitatis  approbates. 

Pone  manum  super  librum. 

9  Jurdbis  de  continuation  Regiminis  tui  in 
quinquennium.  Jurdbis  etiam,  quod  extra  hanc 
Universitatem  nusquam,  prceterquam  Oxoniis,  in 
ilia  Facultate  incipies1,  aut  lectiones  tuas  solen- 
niter  resumes,  nee  consenties  ut  aliquis  alibi  in 
Anglia  incipiens,  hie  pro  Magistro  in  ilia  Fa- 
cultate habeatur. 

Determinants  qu&stionem  in  aurem  Magistro 
sedendo. 

Exito. 


8  Against  the  names,  of  those   who   do   not  appear,   he 
writes:    Non  Cr. 

9  If  by  Proxy,  the  Oath  begins,  Jurabis  in  animam  Ma- 
gislrl  B.,  fyc. 

1  Cum  iisdem  gradibus,  quos  in  Exteris  Academiis  immature 
prceripiunt,  apud  hanc  exornari  iniquissime  affectent  nostratium 
complures : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Anglis  hisce  transfugio  ad  Doctoratus 
Dignitatem  omnis  prcecludatur  aditus,  nisi  Facultatis,  quam 
prqfitentur,  gradu  inferiori  apud  vos  Oxonienses  aut  Dublinienses 
prius  suscepto  Filiorum  Jus  aliquatenus  consequantur ;  utque 
hoc  Decretum  vestrum  Procuratorum  libris  inscriptum  pro  per- 
petuo  Statuto  habeatur.  Senatus-consult.  Mar.  19,  1696.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  405. 


126 

The  other  Masters  are  created  in  the  same 
manner. 

If  the  Proctors  have  any  disputable  cases  re- 
lating to  composition  money,  they  deliver  them 
in  writing,  towards  the  beginning  of  the  Con- 
gregation, to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  who,  with  the 
other  Heads  of  Colleges  present,  usually  de- 
termine them  during  the  time  of  the  Creations. 

In  consequence  of  the  increased  number  of 
Masters  of  Arts,  it  has  been  the  practice  for  some 
years,  to  begin  to  create  them  at  eight  o'clock 
in  the  morning. 

The  English  Poem,  which  has  obtained  the 
Prize  given  by  his  Royal  Highness  the  Chancellor, 
the  Greek  and  Latin  Odes,  and  Epigrams,  which 
have  obtained  Sir  W.  Browne's  Medals,  and  the 
Greek  Translation,  which  has  obtained  the  Porson 
Prize,  are  recited  at  the  end  of  Congregation. 

Some  time  before  the  end  of  the  Term,  a 
Grace  for  a  month's  absence,  for  all  those  who 
have  been  created,  is  read  once,  in  the  Regent 
House : 

Dr.  A.  et  Mr.  B.  et  reliqui  hujus  anni  Incep- 
tores,  petunt  a  Vobis  mensis  absentiam. 

Persons  in  every  Faculty,  whose  standing  in 
the  University  is  such,  that  they  may  be  created 
Doctors  at  the  ensuing  Commencement,  may  be 
admitted  to  the  degree  of  Doctor,  on  any  day 
after  the  Commencement,  and  before  the  end  of 
Term, 


127 


Two  Congregations  are  generally  held  on  the 
Wednesday,  or  Thursday  in  this  week. 


•appointment  of  Deputy 

If  the  Proctors,  and  their  Moderators,  intend 
to  he  absent  during  any  part  of  the  Vacation, 
they  nominate  Deputy  Proctors,  who  are  to  he 
appointed  hy  Grace.  When  elected,  they  take 
the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and  the 
Oath  of  Office. 

The  Proctors  pay  the  Registrary  half  a  crown 
for  each  of  their  Deputies. 


Deferred 

Sometimes  a  Person's  Creation  is  deferred  by 
Grace,  with  a  reservation  of  his  Seniority. 

The  Seniority  should  be  noted  in  the  Proctor's 
list. 

July  7,  1685.  (The  day  after  the  Commence- 
ment) a  Grace  passed  for  creating  a  Person 
Master  of  Arts,  in  that  or  another  Congregation. 

glutrttor  of  ttje  &on$rrttator0'  &etount0* 

One  of  the  Heads  (usually  the  Junior,  if  he 
intend  to  be  in  College)  is  chosen  an  Auditor  of 
the  Conservators'  Accounts. 

The  Audit  is  generally  on  the  Tuesday  fol- 
lowing the  Commencement. 


128 


Oration  tig 

July  7,  1680.  A  Grace  passed  for  creating 
a  Master  by  Proxy  after  the  Commencement. 
Lib.  Graf.  Theta,  p.  181. 

A  like  Grace  passed  for  the  Creation  of  a 
Doctor  in  Divinity,  July  7,  1680.  Lib.  Graf. 
Theta,  p.  181. 

See  a  Grace  for  the  Admission  and  Creation 
of  a  Master  after  the  Commencement,  with  a  re- 
servation of  Seniority,  June  11,  1750.  Lib. 
Grat.  Kappa,  p.  105. 

July  3,  1780.  A  Grace  passed  for  deferring 
the  Creations  of  a  Doctor  in  Divinity,  and  a 
Doctor  in  Law,  till  the  next  Commencement. 
Lib.  Grat.  Lambda,  p.  199. 


of  <£a0fer 

The  Term  ends  on  the  Friday  after  the  Com- 
mencement day. 

The  following  Grace  (prepared  by  the  Regis- 
trary)  is  read  in  the  Regent-House  only : 

Doctor  A.  Magister  B.  et  cceteri  Inceptores 
petunt  a  Vobis  mensis  absentiam. 

The  bell  rings  at  nine  o'clock. 


129 


If  there  be  no  other  business,  the  Vice-Chan- 
eellor  "  reads  the  67th  Psalm,  in  Latin,  and  the 
Absolution,  and  dissolves  the  Congregation  with 
the  Term  ad  decimum  diem  Octobris.  Vid.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  547. 


Some  time  in  July,   or  August,  the  Judges 
arrive  to  hold  the  Summer  Assizes. 

For  the  proceedings,  see  ante  p.  88. 


The  Proctors  invite  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the 
Noblemen,  the  Heads  of  Houses,  the  Doctors, 
the  Commissary,  the  Taxors,  and  the  Registrary, 
to  attend  the  Proclamation  of  Sturbridge  Fair 
on  the  eighteenth  of  September. 

If  the  eighteenth  fall  on  a  Sunday,  the  Pro- 
clamation is  made  on  the  Saturday  before. 

The  Doctors  wear  their  Scarlet  gowns,  and 
the  Proctors  their  hoods  squared. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  company  meet 
in  the  Senate-House  at  eleven.  When  the  date 
of  the  year  is  an  uneven  number,  they  meet  rather 
earlier,  as  in  that  case  the  University  proclaims 
before  the  Corporation. 

2  He  reads  this  Service,  although  he  be  not  in  Order*. 

I 


130 

The  Senior  Proctor  provides  cakes  and  wine 
in  the  Senate-House,  and  carriages  to  carry  the 
Company  to  the  Fair. 

The  Proclamation  is  made  in  three  places. 
It  is  read  by  the  Registrary,  and  repeated  by 
the  Yeoman  Bedell. 

After  the  Proclamation,  the  Proctors  treat 
the  Company  with  oysters,  at  the  tiled  booth. 
They  formerly  gave  a  dinner  at  the  same  place, 
which  has,  for  several  years,  been  discontinued. 

The  Taxors  find  the  bread,  beer,  and  butter 
for  the  oysters. 

The  Servants  have  an  allowance  of  beer,  &c. 

At  a  Court  held  in  the  Fair,  on  a  day  ap- 
pointed by  the  Commissary  and  Proctors  (usually 
the  day  of  the  Proclamation),  there  is  a  sealing 
of  Weights  and  Measures,  &c. 

The  Masters  of  Play-houses,  Shews,  and 
Exhibitions  of  every  kind,  are  sent  for  and 
fined,  if  the  Proctors  chuse  to  require  the  pen- 
alty. 

The  Proctors  give  oysters,  and  a  dinner 3,  the 
Taxor  finding  the  same  articles  as  on  the  first 
Court  Day. 

The  Servants  have  an  allowance  of  beer,  &c. 

1  This  is  now  discontinued. 


131 

On  the  Horse-Fair  day  (the  25th)  and  two 
or  three  days  afterwards,  hops  and  leather  are 
sold  at  the  Fair.  They  are  weighed  by  the 
Taxors'  scales,  who  either  pay  some  Persons  for 
doing  the  business,  or  let  the  scales  for  a  certain 
sum. 


i  2 


FORMULAE 
SUPPLIC ATIONUM 


PRO 


GRADIBUS. 


FORMULA 


SUPPLICATIONUM 


PRO 


GRADIBUS 


Coll ,     UJan.  18—. 

SUPPLICAT  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  duo- 
decim  termini  completi,  in  quibus  ordinarias  lec- 
tiones  audiverit  (licet  non  omnino  secundum 
form  am  Statuti)  per  majorem  par  tern  cujuslibet 
termini,  una  cum  omnibus  oppositionibus,  respon- 
sionibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis  per  Statuta  Regia 
requisitis,  sufficiant  ei  ad  respondendum  quaes- 

tioni. 

C.  D.  Prcelector. 


Coll.  Regal.     14  Jan.  18 — . 
Placeat   Vobis    ut   A.   B.    Collegii    Regalis 
Socius,  bona  vestra  cum  venia,  jam  intret. 

C.  D.  Prcelector. 


136 


Coll. ,     14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  JB.  ut  novem 
termini  completi  post  finalem  ejus  Determina- 
tion em,  in  quibus  ordin  arias  lectiones  audiverit 
(licet  non  omnino  secundum  formam  Statuti)  una 
cum  omnibus  oppositionibus,  responsionibus,  dis- 
putationibus,  declamationibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis 
per  Statuta  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiant  ei  ad  in- 
cipiendum  in  Artibus. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


Coll.  Regal.    14  Jan.  18—. 

Placeat    Vobis   ut   A.   B.    Collegii    Regalis 
Socius,  bona  vestra  cum  venia,  jam  intret. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


Bactaiaurinta  in 

Coll.  -  ,  14  Jan.  18—. 
Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.JB.  ut  studium 
septem  annorum  in  Sacra  Theologia,  postquam 
rexerit  in  Artibus,  in  quibus  ordinarias  lectiones 
audiverit  (licet  non  omnino  secundum  formam 
Statuti)  una  cum  omnibus  oppositionibus,  respon- 
sionibus, concionibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis  per 


137 


Statuta  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat  ei  tarn  ad  op- 
ponendum,  quam  ad  intrandum,  in  eadem  Sacra 
Theologia. 

C.  D.  Prcelector. 


ttatralattrnto  in  Sacra  Ojeoiogia,  miilo  ante 
<T>ratrii 


Coll.  -  ,  14  Jan.  18—. 
Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  studium 
decem  annorum  in  Sacra  Theologia,  postquam 
ad  Academiam  accesserit,  viginti  quatuor  annos 
natus,  una  cum  omnibus  oppositionibus,  respon- 
sionibus,  concionibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis  per 
Statuta  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat  ei,  tarn  ad 
opponendum,  quam  ad  intrandum,  in  eadem 
Sacra  Theologia. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


Snccptor  in  Sacra  Cfjroiogia  ante  13accalaurnt0. 

Coll ,     14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  studium 
quinque  annorum  in  Sacra  Theologia  post  gradum 
Baccalaureatus  in  eadem  Facultate  susceptum,  in 
quibus  ordinarias  lectiones  audiverit  (licet  non 
omnino  secundum  formam  Statuti)  una  cum 
omnibus  oppositionibus,  responsionibus,  concioni- 
bus, caeterisque  exercitiis  per  Statuta  Regia  re- 
quisitis, sufficiat  ei  ad  incipiendum  in  eadem  Sacra 
Theologia. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


138 
^nrrptor  in  $acra  mjrologia  non  antt 


Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  ^4.  2?.  ut  studium 
duodecim  annorum  in  Sacra  Theologia,  postquam 
rexerit  in  Artibus  ;  in  quibus  ordinarias  lectiones 
audiverit  (licet  non  omnino  secundum  form  am 
Statuti)  una  cum  omnibus  oppositionibus,  respon- 
sionibus,  concionibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis  per 
Statuta*  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat  ei  ad  incipien- 
dum  in  eadem  Sacra  Theologia. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


in 

Coll.  -  ,  14  Jan.  18—. 
Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.B.  ut  studium 
sex  annorum  in  Jure  Civili,  in  quibus  ordinarias 
lectiones  audiverit  (licet  non  omnino  secundum 
formam  Statuti)  et  praelectiones  Professoris  Regii 
per  tres  terminos  diligenter  audiverit,  una  cum 
omnibus  responsionibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis  per 
Statuta  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat  ei  ad  intrandum 
in  eodem  Jure. 

C.  D.  Prcelector. 

Snceptot  in  Sure  Cifciii  ante  ISaccalaureu*. 

Coll  -  ,    14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  studium 

quinquc    annorum    post    gradum    Baccalaureatus 


139 


in  Jure  Civili  susceptum,  in  quibus  ordinarias 
lectiones  audiverit  (licet  non  omnino  secundum 
formam  Statuti)  una  cum  omnibus  oppositionibus, 
responsionibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis  per  Statuta 
Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat  ei  ad  incipiendum  in 
eodem  Jure. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


Snrrptor  in  Sure  iftifcili  non  ant*  i3arraiaurcii0. 

Coll ,    14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  It.  ut  studium 
septem  annorum  in  Jure  Civili,  postquam  rexerit 
in  Artibus,  in  quibus  ordinarias  lectiones  audiverit 
(licet  non  omnino  secundum  formam  Statuti)  una 
cum  omnibus  oppositionibus,  responsionibus,  caeteris- 
que exercitiis  per  Statuta  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat 
ei  ad  incipiendum  in  eodem  Jure. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 

Uarralaurru*  in  ffctrturina. 

Coll. ,    14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  JS.  ut  studium 
sex  annorum  in  Medicina,  in  quibus  ordinarias 
lectiones  audiverit  (licet  non  omnino  secundum 
formam  Statuti)  et  praelectiones  Professoris  Regii 
per  duos  terminos  diligenter  audiverit,  una  cum 
omnibus  oppositionibus,  responsionibus,  caeterisque 
exercitiis  per  Statuta  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat  ei 
ad  intrandum  in  eadem  Medicina. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


140 


in 

Coll. ,  14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  studium 
quinque  annorum  in  Medicina,  post  gradum  Bacca- 
laureatus  in  eadem  Facilitate  susceptum,  in  quibus 
ordinarias  lectiones  audiyerit  (licet  non  omnino 
secundum  formam  Statuti)  una  cum  omnibus 
oppositionibus,  responsionibus,  caeterisque  exercitiis 
per  Statuta  Regia  requisitis,  sufficiat  ei  ad  incipi- 
endum  in  eadem  Medicina. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


in  iWrtrictna  non  antr  13att  aiaurtu0, 

Coll.  -  ,  14  Jan.  18—  . 
Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  studium 
septem  annorum  in  Medicina,  postquam  rexerit 
in  Artibus,  in  quibus  ordinarias  lectiones  audiverit 
(licet  non  omnino  secundum  formam  Statuti)  una 
cum  omnibus  oppositionibus,  responsionibus,  cae- 
terisque exercitiis  per  Statuta  Regia  requisitis, 
sufficiat  ei  ad  incipiendum  in  eadem  Medicina. 

C.  D.  Prcelector. 


Dvart  icane  in  jftttfricina  ante  j$TJ5, 

Coll.  -  ,    14  Jan.  18  —  . 

Supplicat   Reverentiis   vestris  A.  B.  ut   stu- 

dium -         -  annorum  in  Arte  Medica,  postquam 


141 

intraverit  in  Medicina,  sufficiat  ei  ad  practicandum 
in  eadem  Facultate;  ita  tamen  ut  ejus  eruditio 
examinetur  et  approbetur4  a  Regie  in  Medicina 
Professore,  et  per  ilium  prsesentetur  Domino 
Pro-Cancellario  in  Senatu,  atque  ut  super  hac 
Concessione  vestra  literas  habeat  testimoniales 
sigillo  vestro  communi  sigillatas. 

Examinatus  et  approbatus  per  \  Q  T\ 

ttvartif  aits  in  itlrDtnna  ante  .3.1*1. 

Coll.  -  ,  14  Jan.  18.—. 
Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  J8.  cujus  mores 
et  eruditionem  examinarunt  et  approbarunt  A.  B. 
Regius  in  Medicina  Professor,  et  C.  Z).  Medicinse 
Doctor,  ut  studium  -  annorum  in  Medicina, 
postquam  rexerit  in  Artibus,  sufficiat  ei  ad  practi- 
candum in  eadem  Facultate;  ita  tamen  ut  per 
Regium  in  Medicina  Professorem  praesentetur 
Domino  Pro-Cancellario  in  Senatu,  atque  ut  literas 
testimoniales  Admissionis  suae  obtineat  sigillo  vestro 
communi  sigillatas. 

CAB 

Examinatus  et  approbatus  a  nobis  \  r  \) 


n 

14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  studium 
decem   annorum   in   Chirurgia,  una   cum  assidua 

4  Sometimes    another    Examiner    is    mentioned    in    the 
Supplicat. 


practica  ejusdem,  cum  approbatione  peritissi- 
morum  in  eadem,  sufficiat  ei  ad  practicandum 
in  eadem  Facultate;  ita  tamen  ut  ejus  cognitio 
prius  examinetur  et  approbetur  a  Regie  in  Medi- 
cina  Professore,  et  per  eum  praesentetur  Domino 
Pro-Cancellario  in  Senatu,  atque  ut  super  hac 
Concessione  vestra  literas  habeat  testimoniales 
sigillo  vestro  communi  sigillatas. 

Form  in  Suck's  Book. 


in 

Coll. ,    14  Jan.  18  — . 

Supplicat,  Reverentiis   vestris  A.  B.   ut  stu- 

dium annorum  in  scientia  Musica,  una  cum 

assidua  ejusdem  praxi,  et  summa  approbatione 
peritorum  in  eadem  Facultate,  sufficiat  ei  ad  in- 
trandum  in  eadem ;  ita  tamen  ut  Canticum  com- 
ponat,  coram  vobis  solenniter  cantandum,  aliquo 
tempore  idoneo,  et  loco  opportune,  ad  assignationem 
Domini  Pro-Cancellarii. 

C.  D.  Pralector. 


;?Jnccptot  in 

Coll ,    14  Jan.  18—. 

Supplicat  Reverentiis  vestris  A.  B.  ut  stu- 
dium  —  annorum  in  scientia  Musica,  una  cum 
assidua  ejusdem  praxi,  et  summa  approbatione 


5  It  is  not  necessary  that  he  should  be  previously  a  Bachelor 
in  Music. 


143 


peritorum  in  eadem  Facultate,  sufficiat  ei  ad 
incipiendum  in  eadem  ;  ita  tamen  ut  Canticum 
componat,  coram  vobis  solenniter  cantandum, 
aliquo  tempore  idoneo,  et  loco  opportuno,  ad 
assignationem  Domini  Pro-Cancellarii. 

C.  D.  Prelector. 


cOratrum. 


Placeat  Vobis,  ut  A.  B.  sit  iisdem  anno,  ordine 
atque  gradu  apud  nos  Cantabrigienses  quibus  est 
ad  f  Oxonienses. 

\  Dublinienses. 


FORMULA 


P  R  m  S  E  N  T  A  N  D I 


AD 


G  R  A  D  U  S. 


148 


Uaccalaurais  in  Sacra 

Dignissimi  Domini  Procurators,  et  tota  Uni- 
versitas  ;  prsesento  Vobis  Reverendum  hunc  Virum, 
quern  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doctrina,  esse  ido- 
neum  ad  opponendum  in  Sacra  Theologia  ;  idque 
vobis  fide  mea  praesto,  totique  Academiae. 


in  £acra 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie 
et  tota  Universitas  ;  praesento  Vobis  Reverendum 
hunc  Virum,  quern  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doc- 
trina, esse  idoneum  ad  intrandum  in  Sacra  Theolo- 
gia; idque  tibi  fide  mea  praesto,  totique  Academiae. 


in  Sacra  Cljcolcgta  per  fttantratum 


Dignissimi  Domini  Procuratores,  et  tota  Uni- 
versitas ;  prassento  Vobis  Reverendum  hunc  Virum 
ut  admittatur  ad  opponendum  in  Sacra  Theologia, 
juxta  tenorem  Mandati  Regii. 


i$accalaureu#  in  Sacra  Cfjr  ologta  per  iilantratum 
lirgtttm. 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie 
et  tota  Universitas  ;  prassento  Vobis  Reverendum 
hunc  Virum  ut  admittatur  ad  intrandum  in  Sacra 
Theologia,  juxta  tenorem  Mandati  Regii. 


149 


.Tjnrrpior  in  Sacra  Oeologia  ante 
iSaccalaureua  \ 

Dignissime,  &c. Prsesento  Vobis  Vene- 

rabilem  hunc  Virum,  quern  scio,  tarn  moribus, 
quam  doctrina,  esse  idoneum  ad  incipiendum  in 
Sacra  Theologia;  idque  tibi  fide  mea  praesto, 
totique  Academiae. 


in  ^acra   3T¥)eologia  non  ante  Bar 
ralaureit*  per  IWantratnm  Urgtiun. 

Dignissimi  Domini  Procurators,  et  tota 
Universitas ;  praesento  Vobis  Reverendum  hunc 
Virum,  ut  admittatur  ad  opponendum  in  Sacra 
Theologia,  juxta  tenorem  Mandati  Regii. 


;?wceptor    in    garni    ^Ijrologia    non   ante 
calaureu0  per  iitantratutn  Urgutm. 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Can cellarie 
et  tota  Universitas ;  praesento  Vobis  Venerabilem 
hunc  Virum,  ut  admittatur  ad  incipiendum  in 
Sacra  Theologia,  juxta  tenorem  Mandati  Regii. 


6  If  he  be  not  a  Bachelor  in  the  Faculty,  he  is  first  pre- 
sented*by  the  Professor  to  the  Proctors,  in  the  Non- Regent 
house,  in  the  form  that  is  used  in  presenting  a  person  for 
a  Bachelor  of  Divinity's  Degree  to  the  Proctors. 


150 


Bacralaureu*  in  Hure  tfittiit, 


Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie 
et  tota  Universitas  ;  praesento  Vobis  hunc  Virum, 
quern  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doctrina,  esse 

f  Jure  Civili  ") 
idoneum   ad  intrandum   in   <    Medicina    >  idque 

(     Musica    ) 
tibi  fide  mea  praesto,  totique  Academise. 


in   Sure  (^tUtlt,   i^lrtrictna, 
,  per  fttanfritum  iirgtum* 

Dignissime,   &c.  Praesento   Vobis   hunc 

C  Jure  Civili ") 

Virum  ut  admittatur  ad  intrandum  in  )  Medicina  V 

(    Musica    ) 

juxta  tenorem  Mandati  Regii. 


in  Sure 


Dignissime,  &c. Preesento  Vobis  hunc 

Virum,  quern  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doctrina, 

f  Jure  Civili  1 
esse  idoneum  ad  incipiendum  in  <  Medicina  } 

I  Musica  J 
idque  tibi  fide  mea  prcesto,  totique  Academise. 


151 


in  fmre  CFttnli, 
per 


Del 


Dignissime,  &c.—  Praesento  Vobis  hunc  Vi- 

f  Jure  Civili  ) 

rum  ut  admittatur  ad  incipiendum  in  <   Medieina  > 

(     Musica    ) 

juxta  tenorem  Mandati  Regii. 


in 


Dignissime,  &c.  —  Praesento  Vobis  hunc  Vi- 
rum,  quern  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doctrina,  esse 
idoneum  ad  practicandum  in  Medieina;  idque 
tibi  fide  mea  praesto,  totique  Academise. 


ati  iL'UnDrm 


Dignissime,  &c.  —  Preesento  Vobis  •  ut 

sit  eisdem  anno,  ordine,  et  gradu,  apud  nos  Can- 

M  ,  (Oxonienses. 

tabriffienses,  quibus  est  apud  suos  4  ^  ,  v  . 

1  1  Dublimenses. 


CAUTION     GRACES. 


CAUTION   GRACES 


IT  sometimes  happens,  that  Candidates  for 
the  degrees  of  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  Doctor  of 
Divinity,  Bachelor  of  Law  or  Physic,  and 
Doctors  in  the  same  Faculties,  have  not  kept 
all  the  exercises  enjoined  by  the  Statutes. 

In  this  case  a  Caution  Grace  (see  the  forms 
posted),  signed  first  by  the  Professor  in  the  Fa- 
culty, and  afterwards  by  the  Vice-Chancellor  and 
a  majority  of  the  Heads  of  Colleges,  allowing 
these  exercises  to  be  kept  in  the  ensuing  Term, 
under  a  penalty  for  neglecting  to  keep  them  at 
that  time,  is  offered  to  the  Senate. 

The  English  and  Latin  Sermons  are  never 
allowed  to  be  cautioned  for,  nor  the  Acts  and 
Opponencies  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Di- 
vinity, or  for  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity, 
unless  taken  per  saltum. 


Coll. ,  14  Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  Sacrae  Theologiae  Baccalaureus, 
omnia  exercitia  prsestiterit,  quae  ad  gradum  Doc- 
toratus  in  eadem  Facilitate,  per  Statuta  Regia, 
requiruntur,  praeter 


156 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dicta  exercitia  differantur 
in  terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis 

peragenda,  sub  poena Cistae  Communi  ap- 

plicand  —  et  ut  ipse  interea,   vel  in  hac,   vel  in 
alia  Congregatione  Admissionem  suam  obtineat. 

Coll. ,  14  Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  Artium  Magister,  omnia  exercitia 
praestiterit,  quae  ad  gradum  Doctoratus  in  Sacra 
Theologia,  per  Statuta  Regia,  requiruntur,  prae- 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dicta  exercitia  differantur 
in  terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis 

peragenda  sub  poena Cistae  Communi  ap- 

plicand  — et  ipse  interea,  vel  in  hac,  vel  in  alia 
Congregatione,  Admissionem  suam  obtineat. 

Coll. ,  14*  Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  in  Jure  Civili  Baccalaureus, 
omnia  exercitia  praestiterit,  quae  ad  gradum  Doc- 
toratus in  Jure  Civili,  per  Statuta  Regia,  requi- 
runtur, praeter 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dicta  exercitia  differantur 
in  terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis 

peragenda,  sub  poena Cistae  Communi  appli- 

cand  —  et  ut  ipse  interea,  vel  in  hac,  vel  in  alia 
Congregatione,  Admissionem  suam  obtineat. 

Coll. ,  14  Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  Artium  Magister,  omnia  exercitia 
praestiterit,  quae  ad  gradum  Doctoratus  in  Jure 
Civili,  per  Statuta  Regia,  requiruntur,  praeter 


157 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dicta  exercitia  differaHtur 
in  terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis 

peragenda,  sub  poena Cistae  Communi   ap- 

plicand  —  et  ut  ipse  interea,   vel  in  hac,   vel  in 
alia  Congregatione,  Admissionem  suam  obtineat. 

Coll. ,  I4*Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  Medicinae  Baccalaureus,  omnia  ex- 
ercitia praestiterit,  quae  ad  gradum  Doctoratus 
in  Medicina,  per  Statuta  Regia,  requiruntur, 
praeter 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dicta  exercitia  differantur 
in  terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis 

peragenda,  sub  poena Cistae  Communi  appli- 

cand  —  et  ut  ipse  interea,  vel  in  hac,  vel  in  alia 
Congregatione,  Admissionem  suam  obtineat. 

Coll. ,  14  Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  Artium  Magister,  omnia  exercitia 
praestiterit,  quae  ad  gradum  Doctoratus  in  Medi- 
cina, per  Statuta  Regia  requiruntur,  praeter  — — - 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dicta  exercitia  differantur  in 
terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis  pera- 
genda, sub  poena Cistae  Communi  appli- 

cand  —  et  ut  ipse  interea,  vel  in  hac,  vel  in  alia 
Congregatione,  Admissionem  suam  obtineat. 

Coll ,  14  Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  Medicinae  Baccalaureus  varia  ex- 
ercitia ad  gradum  Doctoratus  in  Medicina,  per 
Statuta  Regia  requisita,  peragere  teneatur; 


158 

Placeat  Vobis  ut  dicta  exercitia  differantur  in 
terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis  pera- 

genda,  sub  pcena Cistas  Communi  applicand — 

et  ut  ipse  interea,  vel  in  hac,  vel  in  alia  Congre- 
gatione,  Admissionem  suam  obtineat. 

Coll. ,  14  Jan.  18—. 

Cum  A.  B.  omnia  exercitia  praestiterit,  quae 
ad  gradum  Baccalaureatus  in  Medicina,  per  Sta- 
tuta  Regia,  requiruntur,  prseter  unam  oppositi- 
onem; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dictum  exercitium  differatur 
in  terminum  proxime  sequentem,  tune  temporis 
peragendum,  sub  pcena  viginti  solidorum,  Cistae 
Communi  applicandorum,  et  ut  ipse  interea,  vel 
in  hac,  vel  in  alia  Congregatione,  Admissionem 
suam  obtineat. 


FORMS 


OF 


PROCEEDING 


TO 


ALL  DEGREES. 


FORMS   OF    PROCEEDING 


TO 


ALL   DEGREES 


of 

A  PERSON,  who  is  admitted  into  the  u  m- 
versity  before  the  end7  of  the  Easter  Term,  is 
entitled  to  his  degree  in  the  fourth  Lent  Term 
after  his  admission,  provided  he  has  kept  the 
major  part  of  the  twelve  Terms  included  in  the 
above  period,  with  the  exception  of  that  in  which 
he  was  admitted,  and  that  in  which  he  takes 
his  degree. 

This  subject  will  be  made  more  intelligible 
by  the  following  statement: 

A  Person  is  admitted  Easter  Term,  1826. 


Resides 


5  Michaelmas  Term,     1826. 
Lent  Term  \ 

Easter  Term  V  1827. 

Michaelmas  Term  ) 


7  Easter  Term  ends  on  the  Friday  in  the  Commencement 
week. 

L 


162 

Lent  Term 

Easter  Term  !>  1828. 

,  Michaelmas  Term 
Kesides 

Lent  Term 

Easter  Term  }>  1829- 

Michaelmas  Term 


Lent  Term9  1830. 

At  Oxford  they  reckon  four  Terms  in  each 
year,  viz. 

Michaelmas  Term,  which  begins  October  10th, 
ends  December  17th. 

Lent  Term,  which  begins  January  14,  ends 
the  day  after  our  Lent  Term. 

Easter  Term  begins  on  the  same  day  as  ours, 
and  ends  on  the  day  before  Whit-Sunday. 

Act  Term  begins  the  Wednesday  following 
Whit-Sunday,  and  ends  the  day  after  our  Easter 
Term. 

Easter  and  Act  Terms  (together  nearly  equal 
to  our  Easter  Term)  are  reckoned  equal  to  half 
Terms  each. 

At  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  they  reckon  four 
Terms  in  each  year,  viz. 

Michaelmas  Term  — •  Hilary  or  Lent  Term  — 
Easter  Term  —  and  Trinity  Term. 

8  Previous  Examination  takes  place. 

9  Is  admitted  to  his  degree. 


163 


These  two  last  are  reckoned  equal  to  our  Easter 
Term. 

Trinity  Term  always  ends  July  8th. 

By  a  Grace  passed  March  13th  1822,  all 
Persons,  admitted  after  that  period,  are  to  undergo 
a  public  Examination  in  the  Senate-House  in  the 
last  week  of  the  second  Lent  Term  after  their 
admission. 

The  particulars  of  this  Examination  are  detailed 
in  their  proper  place.  See  ante  p.  97. 

The  exercises  for  a  Bachelor's  degree  are  two 
Acts,  and  two  Opponencies. 

These  exercises  he  is  called  upon  to  perform 
in  the  Lent,  Easter,  and  Michaelmas  Terms, 
previous  to  his  admission  ad  respondendum  quce- 


If  he  has  not  kept  the  whole  of  the  above 
exercises,  he  must,  before  his  Supplicat  is  pre- 
sented to  the  Caput,  go  into  the  Sophs'  School, 
and  huddle  for  those  he  has  not  kept. 

At  the  Huddling,  the  Father  of  the  College, 
a  Bachelor  of  Arts,  and  a  Soph,  attend. 

He  goes  to  the  Moderators'  rooms  to  be 
examined1,  from  whom  he  receives  a  Certificate, 

1  This  Examination  is  conducted  by  the  Moderators,,  with 
the  assistance  of  the  two  additional  Examiners,  on  principles 
similar  to  those  laid  down  in  the  Regulations  applicable  to  the 
seventh  and  eighth  Classes. 


164 

in  the  following  form,  signed  by  the  Moderators 
and  the  additional  Examiners  of  the  seventh 
and  eighth  Classes: 

A.  B.  Coll. examinatus  et  approbatus 

a  nobis 

C.  D. 

E.  F. 
G.  H. 
I.  K. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Junior  Proctor,  and 
goes  to  the  Registrary  to  subscribe.  See  ante 
p.  69. 

He  must  have  a  Certificate  under  the  hand 
and  seal  of  the  Master  of  his  College,  or  his 
Locum-tenens,  stating  the  number  of  Terms  he 
has  kept. 

If  he  has  been  prevented  by  illness,  or  by 
any  other  cause,  from  keeping  the  requisite 
number  of  Terms,  he  must  present  to  the  Caput 
a  Certificate  stating  the  circumstances  which  pre- 
vented him. 

The  Certificate,  if  the  omission  has  proceeded 
from  ill  health,  must  be  in  a  prescribed  form, 
and  signed  by  the  Physician,  or  Surgeon,  who 
attended  him.  See  ante  p.  74. 

This  degree  requires  only  one  Congregation, 
at  which  the  Candidate  appears  in  an  Under- 
graduate's gown,  and  the  hood  of  a  Bachelor  of 
Arts  over  it. 


165 

His  Supplicat,  dated  and  signed  by  the 
Lecturer  of  the  College,  is  then  presented  to 
the  Caput,  together  with  the  Certificates  of  his 
having  kept  his  Terms,  and  passed  both  the 
Examinations. 

His  Subscription  is  shewn  to  the  Caput  by 
the  Registrary. 

When  the  Supplicat  has  passed  the  Caput, 
it  is  then  taken  by  a  Bedell  into  the  Non-Regent 
House,  where  it  is  read  by  the  Senior  Scrutator 
and  walked  with. 

It  is  then  read  by  the  Senior  Proctor  in  the 
Regent-House,  and  walked  with. 

The  Candidate  receives  a  copy  of  his  Admission 
Oath  from  the  ,  School-keeper.  See  the  Oath, 
ante,  p.  77.  f 

He   is  presented  to   the   Vice-Chancellor  by 

a   Regent  Master    (usually   the   Father   of   his 

College.)  See  the  form   of  presentation,    ante, 

p.  77. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  to 
him  the  Oath  of  Admission. 

He  walks  round  the  chair,  and  bows  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors. 

He  kneels  before  the  Vice-Chancellor,  who 
admits  him  in  the  usual  form,  ad  respondendum 
qucBstioni 


166 

He  answers  the  question,  which  is  always 
asked  him  by  the  Father  in  the  Senate-House, 
except  at  the  regular  time  of  Admission. 

If  a  Person  be  admitted  ad  respondendum 
qucestioni  after  the  regular  time,  and  on  or  before 
Ash- Wednesday,  he  is  called  Baccalaureus  ad 
dies  Cinerum. 

If  he  be  admitted  after  Ash- Wednesday,  he 
is  called  Baccalaureus  ad  Baptistam. 

If  he  be  admitted  after  the  last  Act  (second 
Tripos)  and  before  the  fourteenth  of  January 
following,  he  is  to  reckon  the  number  of  Terms, 
necessary  for  the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts,  from 
the  second  Tripos  day  after  his  Admission.  See 
the  Grace,  May  14,  1628.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  378. 

Feb.  21,  1^97.  It  was  determined  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads  of  Colleges,  that  any 
Person,  admitted  to  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Arts,  between  the  days  of  the  first  and  second 
Tripos,  shall  be  considered  as  determining  with 
the  Bachelors  of  the  following  year. 

No  Supplicat  is  offered  for  a  Fellow  of  King's 
College  to  be  admitted  ad  respondendum  quces- 
tioni,  but  a  Grace  is  shewn  to  the  Vice-Chancellor 
(See  this  Grace  inter  Formulas  Supplicationum, 
&p.  p.  135.)  This  Grace  is  an  application  to  the 
Regents  for  their  leave  to  enter  the  Regent- 
House  for  Admission. 

If    there    be    no    other    business    than    the 


167 


Admission  of  a  Fellow  of  King's  College  to  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  no  Caput  is  called. 
Buck's  Book. 


of 


He  must  be  a  Bachelor  of  Arts  of  three  years 
standing  at  least,  which  time  is  reckoned  from  the 
second  Tripos  day  following  his  Admission  ad 
respondendum  qucestioni. 

But  this  relates  only  to  Persons  who  were 
admitted  ad  respondendum  qu&stioni  on  or  before 
Ash-  Wednesday  ;  those  who  were  admitted  be- 
tween the  first  and  second  Tripos  days  being  to 
determine  with  the  Bachelors  of  the  following 
year.  See  the  Decree,  Feb.  21,  1797,  before- 
mentioned. 

He  pays  the  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in  the  Registrar's 
book. 

He  keeps  three  Acts  against  a  Master  of  Arts, 
and  two  Acts  against  a  Bachelor  of  Arts,  and 
declaims  once. 

These  Exercises  are  now  usually  performed 
privately,  before  his  Supplicat  is  offered. 

He  attends  the  first  Congregation,  in  a  Ba- 
chelor's gown  and  hood. 

The  Registrary  shews  to  the  Caput  that  he 
has  subscribed. 


168 

His  Supplicat  is  presented  to  the  Caput,  and 
read  in  both  Houses. 

Between  the  two  Congregations  he2  visits 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  rest  of  the  Caput, 
and  all  Regents,  in  his  Bachelor's  gown  and 
hood. 

He  comes  to  the  second  Congregation  in  the 
same  habit,  and  is  examined3  in  Greek  by  one 
of  the  Bedells. 

The  Supplicat  is  read  a  second  time  in  the 
Non-Regent  House,  where  the  Scrutiny  of 


f  placet 

I  non  placet 


is  marked  by  the  two  Scrutators,  and  one  other 
Non-Regent  at  least,  whilst  a  Bedell  calls  ad 
Scrutinium,  8yc. 

If  no  one  dissent,  the  Senior  Scrutator  says : 
Placet  eis. 

The  Supplicat  is  then  read  by  the  Senior 
Proctor  in  the  Regent  House,  and  the  same 
Scrutiny  paper  of 


(  placet . 

1  non  placet 


2  The  practice  of  visiting  is  now  discontinued.     The  Can- 
didates for  degrees  ask  the  Vice-Chancellor  leave  to  proceed 
as  he  is  quitting  the  Senate-House. 

3  This  is  discontinued. 


169 


is  marked  by  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two 
Proctors;  and,  if  the  Person  he  approved,  the 
Senior  Proctor,  in  his  place  says,  Placeat  eis, 
placeat  Vobis  ut  intret. 

A  copy  of  the  Oath  of  Admission  is  delivered 
to  the  Candidate  by  the  School-keeper: 

Jurdbis  quod  nihilex  Us  omnibus,  sciens,  volens, 
prtztermisisti,  qua  per  Leges  aut  probatas  Con- 
suetudines  hujus  Academic  ad  hunc  Gradum 
quern  ambis  adipiscendum,  aut  peragenda,  aut 
persolvenda,  requiruntur;  nisi  quatenus  per  Gra- 
tiam  ab  Academid  concessam  tecum  dispensatum 
fuerit. 

Jurdbis  etiam,  quod  Cancellario  et  Pro-Can- 
cellario  nostro,  comiter  obtemperabis :  et  quod 
Statuta  nosfra,  Ordinationes,  et  Consuetudines 
approbatas,  observabis. 

Denique  jurabis,  quod  compositionem  inter 
Academiam  et  Collegium  Regale  factam  sciens 
volens,  non  violabis :  et  quod  in  Bibliothecam 
publicam  et  Museum  Honoratissimi  Domini  Vice- 
Comitis  Fitzwilliam  admissus,  jure  isto  tuo  ita 
uteris,  ut,  quantum  in  te  est9  nihil  inde  detrimenti 
capiat  vel  Bibliotheca,  vel  Museum  prtedictum : 
in  h&c  autem  verba  jurabis,  secundum  tenorem 
Senatus-consulti  in  cautelam  jurantium  facti*. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia. 

3  Jul.  1647. 

4  Placet  Vobis,  ut  in  majorem  in  posterum  cautelam  juran- 
tium et  levamen,  hcec  verba  sint  annexa  jura/mentis  Academics 

Matriculationis,  Admissionis,  Creationis : 

"  Senatus 


170 

He  is  presented  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  by  a 
Regent  Master.  See  the  Formula,  p.  147. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Oath  of  Admission  is  read  to 
him  by  the  Senior  Proctor.  See  p.  169- 

The  Vice-Chancellor   and  Proctors   stand  in 


Scio 


Scrutiny  of  •<  Credo.  .  . 
\Nescio . 


If  no  one  dissent/ he  follows  a  Bedell  round 
the  chair,  and  bows  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  and 
Proctors. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  then  admits  him  in  the 
usual  form. 


of  &rt0,  .dFtflott  of  lting'0 

There  is  only  one  Congregation  required. 

He  visits5  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Caput, 
and  all  Regents,  some  time  before  the  Congre- 
gation, in  a  Bachelor's  gown  and  hood ;  pays  his 

"  Senatus  Cantabrigiensis  decrevit  et  declaravit  eos  omnes, 
"  qui  monitionibus,  correctionibus,  mulctis,  et  pcenis  Statutorum, 
"  Legum,  Decretorum,  ordinationum,  injunctionum,  et  laudabilium 
cc  consuetudinum  hujus  Academics  Iransgressoribus  quovis  modo 
"  incumbentibus  humiliter  se  submiserint,  nee  esse  nee  habendos 
tf  esse  perjurii  reos" 

Et  ut  hcec  vestra  concessio  pro  Statute  habeatur,  et  infra 
decent  dies  in  libris  Procuratorum  inscribatur. 

5  This  is  now  discontinued. 


171 


fees   to   the   Senior   Proctor,   and   subscribes  the 
36th  Canon  in  the  Registrary's  book. 

At  the  Congregation,  which  he  attends  in  the 
gown  and  hood  of  a  Bachelor  of  Arts,  a  copy  of 
his  Admission  Oath  is  delivered  to  him,  his 
Grace6  is  shewn  to  the  Vice-Chancellor7,  and 
read  by  the  Senior  Proctor  in  the  Regent  House 
only. 

He  reads  Greek 8  to  a  Bedell. 

He  is  presented,  takes  the  Oaths,  and  is  ad- 
mitted in  the  usual  form. 

The  Fellows  of  King's  College  require  Sup- 
plicats  in  the  usual  form  for  all  degrees,  except 
those  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  and  Master  of  Arts. 


of  &rt*  from  c&xfotfr  or  Dufcitn. 

He  brings  a  Certificate  (on  a  stamp)  of  the 
time  of  his  final  determination  for  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts. 

He  must  enter  his  name  in  some  College  of 
this  University. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
goes  to  the  Registrary  to  subscribe  the  36th 
Canon,  under  the  article  of  Incorporate, 

6  See  the  Formula,  p.  136. 

7  No  Caput  is  required  for  this  degree. 

8  This  is  now  discontinued. 


172 

He  comes  to  the  first  Congregation  in  the 
gown  and  hood  of  a  Bachelor  of  Arts,  and  receives 
a  copy  of  the  Incorporation  Oath  from  the  School- 
keeper. 

His  Grace  for  Incorporation  is  presented  to 
the  Caput,  (see  the  form,  p.  143.)  and  is  read,  and 
walked  with,  in  hoth  Houses. 

He  is  presented  (usually  by  the  Senior  Proc- 
tor) in  these  words: 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie 
et  tota  Universitas ;  prcesento  Vobis  hum  Virum, 
ut  sit  iisdem  anno,  ordine,  et  gradu,  apud  nos 

~    ±  7   .  .  .7  (Oxonienses. 

Lantabngienses,  ambus  est  apud  suos  { ^  ,  7.  . 

\Dubhmenses. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Incorporation  Oath  is  ad- 
ministered to  him  by  the  Senior  Proctor: 

Jurabis,  quod  observabis  Leges,  Statuta,  Pri- 
vilegia,  et  Consuetudines,  hujus  Academics  Can- 
tabrigiensis,  quatenus  non  contrariantur  Legibus, 
Statutis,  Consuetudinibus,  et  PrivilegUs,  Acade- 

(Oxoniensis. 
mice  vestrce  1^,7.. 

(jUublimenws. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia 

He  kneels  down  before  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
who  admits  him  in  these  words: 

Authoritate  nobis  commissa,  nos  admittimus 
te  ut  sis  hie,  apud  nos,  iisdem  anno,  or  dine,  et 


173 

j          .7  (Oxonienses,   \    . 

gradu,  ambus  es  apud  tuos  {  _  7  7.  .          I   in 

{DuUimensesJ 

nomine  Patris,  et  Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 

Immediately  after  his  Admission,  he  goes  to 
the  Schools,  with  a  Master  of  Arts,  and  a  Ba- 
chelor of  Arts,  and  keeps  the  Exercises  for  the 
degree  of  Master  of  Arts,  viz.  three  Acts  against 
a  Master  of  Arts,  and  two  against  a  Bachelor  of 
Arts,  and  a  Declamation. 

He  returns  to  the  Senate-House,  and  sub- 
scribes the  36th  Canon,  under  the  article  of  his 
College,  in  the  Registrars  book. 

His  Supplicat,  in  the  common  form,  and  the 
Certificate  of  his  standing  at  Oxford,  are  read  in 
the  Caput,  and  the  Supplicat  is  read  in  the  two 
Houses. 

Between  the  two  Congregations  he  visits 9  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  the  rest  of  the  Caput,  and 
all  Regents,  in  a  Bachelor's  gown  and  hood. 

He  comes  to  the  second  Congregation  in  the 
same  habit;  receives  a  copy  of  the  Admission 
Oath ;  reads  Greek *  to  one  of  the  Bedells ;  and 
his  Supplicat  passes  the  Houses. 

He  is  presented,  takes  the  Oaths,  and  is 
admitted  in  the  usual  form. 

9  Now  discontinued. 
1  This  is  discontinued. 


174 


Bachelor  of 

He  must  be  a  Master  of  Arts  of  seven  years 
standing.  Stat.  Eliz.  8.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  230. 

The  Exercises,  required  for  this  degree,  are 
one  Act  (to  be  kept  after  the  fourth  year)  two 
Opponencies2,  a  Latin  Sermon,  (Concio  ad  Clerum) 
and  an  English  one. 

He  must  wait  upon  the  King's  Professor  in 
Divinity,  for  his  approbation  of  the  Question, 
which  he  proposes  to  defend  in  the  Schools,  and 
on  which  he  intends  to  write  a  Thesis. 

The  Professor  gives  him  the  second  Question, 
and  appoints  the  day 3  on  which  he  is  to  keep  his 
Act. 

A  copy  of  these  Questions 4  he  leaves,  with  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  with  the  Regius  Professor  in 

2  If,  when  he  keeps  his  Act,  a  Doctor  of  Divinity  be  one 
of  his  Opponents,  these  Opponencies  are  not  required.     Stat. 
Eliz.  10.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  231. 

3  Acts  in  the  Divinity   Schools,   are  to  kept  on  every 
second   Thursday   during   Term.     Stat.   Eliz.  26.    Lib.  Stat. 
p.  237- 

4  The  Questions  are  written  in  the  following  form : 

Q.  S. 

1.  Homo  Jidelis  ac  regenitus  potest  deficere. 

2.  Jesus  Nazarenus  fuit  verus  Messias. 

Respond.  A.  B. 

Coll 

19°  Die  Octob. 


175 


Divinity,  and  with  the  Senior  Doctor  of  Divinity 
resident  in  the  University.  Stat.  Eliz.  26.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  237.  If  there  be  no  Doctor  of  Divinity 
resident,  he  leaves  them  with  the  Senior  Bachelor 
in  Divinity  then  present. 

He  delivers,  eight  days  (at  least)  before  the 
Act  is  to  be  kept,  three  copies  of  his  Questions  to 
a  Bedell,  who  inserts  the  names  of  the  Oppo- 
nents5, and  sends  them  out  on  the  following  day. 
Stat.  Eliz.  30.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  240. 

He  delivers,  eight  days  (at  least)  before  the 
Act,  another  copy  to  the  University  Marshall,  who 
affixes  it  to  the  School  doors  the  same  day.  Stat. 
EKx.  30.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  240. 

The  bell  begins  to  ring  for  the  Act  at  one 
o'clock. 

The  Respondent  (in  a  gown  and  cassock  and 
black  hood)  with  his  cap  off,  goes  from  his  College 
to  the  Divinity  Schools  a  quarter  before  two,  at- 
tended by  the  Members  of  his  College,  and  pre- 
ceded by  a  Bedell. 

The  Regius  Professor  in  Divinity,  who  acts 
as  Moderator  on  this  occasion,  or  his  Deputy, 
comes  from  the  Public  Library  to  the  Schools, 
in  his  cope,  preceded  by  a  Bedell. 


5  By  the  Statute,  the  Opponencies  are  to  be  against  a 
Bachelor  of  Divinity,  but  by  an  interpretation,  June  11, 
1574.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  320.  opposing  a  Master  of  Arts  is  suf- 
ficient. 


176 

The  Book  of  Statutes  belonging  to  one  of  the 
Proctors  is  laid  upon  the  Opponent's  rostrum. 

The  Professor  ascends  the  chair,  and  says  to 
the  Respondent;  Agas  Domine. 

He  begins  with  the  following  prayer : 

Actiones  nostras  singulas,  Domine9  dementis- 
simo  tuo  favore  prceveni,  et  perpetuo  auxilio  pro- 
sequere,  ut  in  omnibus  operibus  nostris  in  te 
inceptis,  continuatis,  et  finitis,  Sanctum  tuum 
nomen  glorificemus,  et  tandem  miseratione  tud 
vitam  ceternam  consequamur  per  Jesum  Christum 
Dominum  nostrum.  Amen. 

He  states  his  two  Questions,  and  reads  a 
Thesis6  upon  the  first. 

When  he  has  finished  his  Thesis,  the  Pro- 
fessor says,  Ascendat  Opponentium  primus. 

The  first  Opponent  produces  three  arguments 
against  the  first  Question,  and  two  against  the 
second. 

The  Professor  (when  the  first  Opponent  has 
finished)  says,  Ascendat  Opponentium  secundus. 

The  second  Opponent  produces  two  arguments 
against  the  first  Question,  and  one  against  the 
second. 


6  Nulla  in  quacunque  Facultate,  Moderatoris,  Patris,  Pro- 
curatorisy  aut  Respondentis,  Determinatio,  qucestionis  Explicatio, 
sen  qucecunque  alia  continuata  Dictio,  dimidium  horos  ad  sum~ 
mum  superet.  Senatus-consult.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  367- 


177 


When  he  has  finished,  the  Professor  says, 
Ascendat  Opponentium  tertius. 

The  third  Opponent  produces  one  argument 
against  each  Question. 

The  third  Opponent  having  finished,  the 
Professor  reads  his  Determination  on  the  second 
Question,  and  ends  with 

Gratia  Domini  nostri  Jesu  Christi,  8$. 

Gremials  must  perform  all  their  exercises 
before  the  Feast  of  St.  Barnabas 7,  unless  their 
own  turns,  for  preaching  at  St.  Mary's,  or  dis- 
puting in  the  Divinity  Schools,  shall  be  between 
the  aforesaid  Feast,  and  the  Commencement, 
or  they  be  hindered  by  just  cause,  to  be  allowed 
of,  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  one  of  the  Professors 
of  Divinity,  and  the  Senior  Doctor  of  Divinity, 
present  in  the  University.  Decree,  1626.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  484. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in  the  Registrary's 
book. 

The  earliest  time  of  proceeding  to  this  degree 
for  Masters  of  Arts  of  seven  years  standing  is 
on  the  eleventh  of  June. 

The  degree  requires  two  Congregations. 

The  Candidate  comes  to  the  first  Congregation 
in  a  gown  and  cassock,  and  a  black  hood. 


7  This  Decree  is  never  acted  upon. 
M 


178 

His  Supplicat  (see  the  form,  p.  136.)  is  pre- 
sented to  the  Caput,  and  read  in  both  Houses. 

Before  the  next  Congregation  he  visits8,  in 
the  same  dress,  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  other 
Members  of  the  Caput,  the  Heads  of  Colleges, 
and  Doctors  of  Divinity,  and  waits  on  the 
Professor 9  of  Divinity  requesting  him  to  present. 

At  the  next  Congregation,  his  Supplicat  is 
read  by  the  Senior  Scrutator  a  second  time  in 
the  Non-Regent  House,  and  the  Scrutiny  is 
marked;  it  is  then  read  a  second  time  by  the 
Senior  Proctor  in  the  Regent-House,  where  the 
Scrutiny  is  also  marked. 

He  receives  a  copy  of  his  Admission  Oath 
from  the  School-keeper,  and  is  presented  (as  on 
the  eleventh  of  June)  by  the  Regius  Professor 
in  Divinity,  or  in  his  absence  by  some  other 
Doctor  in  the  Faculty,  to  the  Proctors  in  the 
Non-Regent  House,  and  afterwards  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supre- 
macy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  the 
Oath  of  Admission. 


The  Scrutiny  of  \  credo ,  . I  is  marked, 


(  scio 
[nescio. 


8  He  asks  leave  to  proceed  of  the  Vice-Chancellor  as  he  is 
quitting  the  Senate-House ;  the  visiting  is  now  discontinued. 

9  He  waits  on  the  Professor  a  day  or  two  before  the  Con- 
gregation, if  it  be  on  any  other  day  than  the  eleventh  of  June. 


179 

and  the  Vice-Chancellor   admits   him    kneeling. 
See  the  form,  p.  117. 


of  £Hutmtt>  tjp  tfjc  jltnti)  of 


If  a  Person  of  the  age  of  twenty-four  years, 
be  admitted  of  any  College,  he  may  take  the 
degree  of  B.D.  after  ten  years,  without  having 
taken  any  other.  Stat.  Eliz.  9.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  230. 

He  must  reside  in  some  College  the  greater 
part  of  three  several  Terms  during  his  last  two 
years  *. 

Before  a  day  is  assigned  for  his  Act,  he  is 
examined  by  the  Regius  Professor  in  Divinity, 
in  the  Scriptures,  the  Evidences  and  Doctrines 
of  Christianity,  and  the  writings  of  some  Greek 
or  Latin  Fathers,  for  the  purpose  of  ascertaining 
whether  he  has  complied  with  the  provisions 
of  the  Statute,  and  actually  devoted  himself  to 
the  study  of  Theology. 

He  keeps  one  Act,  two  Opponencies  2,  and 
preaches  one  Latin,  and  one  English  Sermon. 

He  performs  these  exercises  in  a  gown  and 
cassock,  and  a  black  hood. 

1  This  residence  may  be  kept  any  time  after  the  eighth 
year  ;  but  is  not  necessarily  in  the  ninth  and  tenth  year. 

*  Unless  he  responds  to  a  Doctor,  in  which  case  the 
Opponencies  are  not  required.  Stat.  Eliz.  10.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  231. 

M2 


180 

When  the  days  appointed  for  the  Divinity 
Acts  are  all  engaged,  the  Professor  sometimes 
grants  a  private  Act,  on  which  occasion  any 
Doctor  of  Divinity  may  preside.  If  no  Doctor 
of  Divinity  is  willing  to  undertake  the  Office, 
the  Father  of  the  College  usually  Moderates, 
who  sits  in  the  same  seat  with  the  Opponent. 

There  must  he  laid  hefore  the  Caput,  together 
with  his  Supplicat,  a  Certificate  of  the  time  of 
his  Admission  into  the  College,  and  of  his 
having  kept  three  Terms  after  the  eighth  year 
of  his  Admission,  signed  and  sealed  by  the 
Master  of  the  College,  or  his  Locum-tenens ; 
and  also  a  Certificate  of  his  age  properly 
attested. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor, 
and  subscribes,  and  visits,  and  is  admitted 
in  the  same  manner  as  other  Bachelors  of 
Divinity. 

Doctor  in  Otimtttij. 

If  the  Candidate  be  a  Bachelor  of  Divinity, 
he  must  have  been  so  five3  years. 

If  he  be  a  Master  of  Arts,  and  not  a  Gremial4, 
he  may  take  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity 

3  Sometimes   a   Person   is   admitted   Doctor  of  Divinity, 
after  the  Commencement,  and  before  the  end  of  the  Term,  in 
the  fifth  year. 

4  Gremial  is  one  having  his  name  on  the  boards. 


181 

per    saltum,    provided    he    be    of   twelve    years 
standing,  from  the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts. 

His  exercises  are,  one  Act,  two  Opponencies5, 
a  Latin  Sermon,  an  English  one,  and  a  Determi- 
nation 6  within  one  year  after  the  degree  has  been 
taken. 

If  he  be  a  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  he  preaches 
the  Clerum  in  a  Doctor's  cope.  The  other 
Exercises  are  performed  in  the  habit  of  a  Non- 
Regent. 

If  he  be  a  Master  of  Arts,  he  performs  all 
the  Exercises  in  the  habit  of  a  Non-Regent. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in  the  Registrary's 
book. 

By  a  Decree  of  1678,  his  Supplicat  must 
be  offered  to  the  University  on  or  before  the 
Feast  of  St.  Barnabas.  Lib.  Stat.  4987. 

If  he  have  not  kept  all  the  requisite  Exercises, 
a  Grace  is  necessary,  allowing  him  to  keep  them 
in  the  following  Term,  which  he  is  to  do  under 

3  Unless  he  responds  to  a  Doctor,  in  which  case  the 
Opponencies  are  not  necessary.  Slat.  Etiz.  10.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  231. 

6  He   pays  forty   shillings   into   the  hands   of  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,    which    is    returned    to  him,    if   he  makes   the 
Determination  within  one  year  after  Creation.     Stat.  Eliz.  1 1 . 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  231. 

7  This  Decree  has  not  been  acted  upon  for  many  years. 


182 

a  penalty  for  each  Exercise8  omitted,  which  he 
pays  into  the  hands  of  the  Vice-Chancellor  before 
his  Caution  Grace  is  signed  hy  him. 

This  Grace  must  he  signed  hy  the  Regius 
Professor  of  Divinity,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and 
the  majority  of  the  Heads  of  Colleges,  on  whom 
he  calls  for  that  purpose,  before  the  Congrega- 
tion in  which  he  applies  for  his  degree,  in  the 
dress  of  a  Non-Regent,  and  attended  by  the 
Father  of  his  College  in  his  hood. 

At  the  first  Congregation,  he.  attends  in  his 
gown,  cassock,  and  black  hood,  when  his  Caution 
Grace  (if  he  has  one)  and  Supplicat  are  presented 
to  the  Caput,  and  read  in  both  Houses. 

Before  the  next  Congregation,  he  visits9  the 
Vice-Chan cellor  and  the  rest  of  the  Caput,  the 
Heads  of  Colleges,  and  Doctors  of  the  Faculty, 
in  the  same  habit. 

He  waits  on  the  Professor  of  Divinity  with 
a  request  to  be  presented  by  him. 

At  the  second  Congregation  he  appears  in  the 
same  habit,  when  his  Caution  Grace  and  Supplicat 
are  again  read  and  voted  in  both  Houses. 

The  School-keeper  gives  him  a  copy  of  the 
Admission  Oath  (p.  169.) 

8  The  Sermons  are  never  cautioned  for. 

9  The   visiting   is   now    discontinued,    but    he    asks   the 
Vice-Chancellor,   as  he   is    quitting  the   Senate-House  after 
the  first  Congregation,  leave  to  proceed  to  his  degree. 


183 

If  he  be  a  Master  of  Arts  only1,  he  is 
presented  by  the  Professor  (or,  in  his  absence, 
by  some  other  Doctor  in  the  Faculty)  to  the 
Proctors  in  the  Non-Regent  House,  in  the 
following  words : 

Dignissimi  Domini,  Domini  Procuratores,  et 
tota  Universitas;  Prcesento  Vobis  Reverendum 
hum  Vlrum,  quern  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam 
doctrind,  esse  idoneum  ad  opponendum  in  Sacra 
Theologia;  idque  J^obis  fide  mea  prcesto,  totique 
Academic?. 

He  then  kneels  down  before  the  Senior 
Proctor,  who,  taking  his  hands  between  his, 
admits  him  in  the  following  words: 

Authoritate  nobis  commissa,  nos  admittimus 
te  ad  opponendum  in  Sacra  Theologia,  in  nomine 
Patris,  et  Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 

The  Professor  then  presents  him  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  in  these  words: 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie, 
et  tota  Universitas ;  Prcesento  Vobis  Venerabilem 
hunc  Vlrum,  quern  scio,  tarn  moribus,  quam  doc- 
trind, esse  idoneum  ad  incipiendum  in  Sacra 
Theologia ;  idque  tibi  fide  mea  prcesto,  totique 
Academic?. 

He  then  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and 
Supremacy ;  and  the  Oath  of  Admission  is  ad- 
ministered to  him  by  the  Senior  Proctor. 

1  If  he  be  B.D.,  he  is  not  presented  to  the  Proctors,  but  to 
the  Vice-Chancellor  only,  and  in  a  cope* 


184 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors   stand  in 

f  scio • 

Scrutiny   of  <  credo  .... - 

{  nescio ....  - 

A  Bedell  then  brings  the  Professor  to  the 
table,  who  usually  marks  the  scio  line:  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors  also  mark  the 
Scrutiny:  after  which  the  Candidate  follows  the 
Bedell  round  the  chair  and  bows  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  Professor,  &c. 

He  then  kneels  before  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
who  admits  him  in  the  following  words : 

Authoritate  mihi  commissa,  admitto  te  ad 
interpretandum,  et  prqfitendum,  universam  Sa- 
cram  Scripturam,  tarn  Veteris,  quam  Novi 
Testamenti:  in  nomine  Patris,  et  Filii,  et 
Spiritus  Sancti. 


of 

A  Candidate  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Laws,  must  be  of  six  years  standing  complete. 
Stat.  Eliz.  12.  Lib.  Stat. 


He  must  have  resided  the  greater  part  of  nine2 

several  Terms  ;    and  bring   a   Certificate  of  such 

residence,  under  the  hand  and  seal  of  the  Master 

of  his  College,  or  his  Locum-tenem.    Deer.  Pre- 

fect. Sept.  19,  1684.   Lib.  Stat.  p.  504. 

2  No  excuse  for  non-residence  on  account  of  illness  is 
admitted,  as  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 


185 

He  must  have  attended  the  Lectures  of  the 
Regius  Professor  of  Civil  Law  during  three 
Terms;  and  must  produce  to  the  Caput  a  Cer- 
tificate of  his  having  done  so,  signed  by  the 
Professor.  Senatus-consult.  Nav.  12,  1768.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  434. 

He  must  also  produce  to  the  Caput  a  Certificate 
of  his  having  passed  what  is  usually  called  the 
Previous  Examination.  Senatus-consult.  Mar.  13, 
1822. 

The  present  Regius  Professor  of  Civil  Law, 
upon  his  appointment  to  the  Office,  instituted 
an  Examination  in  the  subjects  of  his  Lectures; 
and  the  Students  in  Civil  Law  have  been  classed3 
by  him  according  to  their  merits,  as  well  at  the 
Examination,  as  in  the  performing  of  the  Act 
in  the  Schools. 

He  is  required  to  keep  one  Act,  which  may 
take  place  at  any  time  after  he  is  of  four  years 
standing,  and  has  resided  nine  Terms. 


3  Candidates  for  the tfirst  Class  are  expected  to  be  prepared 
in  the  three  books  of  the  Analysis  of  Lectures  in  Civil  Law. 
The  Professor  however  does  not  examine  them  in  the  whole  of 
the  Analysis.  He  usually  selects  a  certain  number  of  Chapters, 
of  which  he  gives  notice  in  the  course  of  his  Lectures,  and 
mentions  the  days,  on  which  he  intends  to  hold  Examina- 
tions. 

And  every  Student  in  Civil  Law  is  expected  to  pass  a 
satisfactory  Examination,  in  the  whole  of  the  first  book  of 
the  Analysis,  and  the  first  seven  Chapters  of  the  second 
book. 


186 

He  is  to  defend  two  questions;  the  first  of 
which  is  chosen  by  himself,  and  to  be  approved 
of  by  the  Professor :  the  other  is  given  him  by 
the  Professor. 

He  writes  a  Thesis  on  the  first  question, 
and  the  Professor  appoints  a  day  for  keeping 
the  Act,  a  few  days  before  which  he  delivers 
a  copy  of  his  questions  (written  in  the  following 
form)  to  the  University  Marshall,  who  affixes 
it  to  the  School  doors  three  days  before  the  Act  is 
kept. 

Q.S. 

A  contractu  perfecto  recedere  non  licet. 

Jus  Civile  nee  plectit  nee  improbat  secundas 
nuptias. 

Dec.  die  14°. 

Resp.  A.  B. 

Coll.  C.  D. 

A  few  days  before  he  keeps  his  Act,  he  also 
takes  a  copy  of  his  questions  to  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, and  to  one  of  the  Bedells. 

On  the  day  of  keeping  he  goes  from  his 
College,  about  twenty  minutes  before  two,  pre- 
ceded by  a  Bedell,  and  attended  by  the  Father 
of  the  College. 

He  wears  a  full  sleeved  gown  and  a  white 
hood,  and  walks  with  his  cap  off. 

When  he  arrives  at  the  Law-schools,  he  goes 
into  the  Respondent's  box,  where  he  waits  for 
the  Professor. 


187 

The  Bedell,  accompanied  by  the  Father  of 
the  College,  then  fetches  the  Professor  from  the 
Public  Library. 

The  Professor  takes  his  seat,  and  the  Father 
(having  seated  himself  in  the  Opponent's  box) 
says  Domine  Respondens  agas. 

The  Respondent  then  reads  his  Thesis,  which 
generally  lasts  about  half  an  hour. 

The  Professor,  who  is  usually  the  Opponent, 
then  brings  as  many  arguments  (in  a  Syllogistic 
form)  against  each  question,  as  he  thinks  proper. 

When  the  disputation  is  finished,  the  Pro- 
fessor expresses  (in  a  short  sentence)  his  sense 
of  the  manner,  in  which  the  Respondent  has 
acquitted  himself:  and  the  whole  is  concluded 
by  the  Professor  delivering  his  opinion  on  the 
second  question,  which  is  called  his  Determina- 
tion. 

If,  on  or  before  the  first  day  of  February 
in  his  fourth  year,  he  did  not  declare,  in  writing, 
to  the  Master  of  his  College,  or  his  Locum- 
tenens,  that  it  was  not  his  intention  to  proceed 
to  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts4  he  forfeits 
three  pounds  to  the  University  Chest,  which 
sum  is  paid,  together  with  the  usual  fees,  to 


4  If,  after  this  Declaration,  he  proceed  to  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts,  he  also  pays  three  pounds,  beyond  the 
usual  fees,  to  the  Junior  Proctor. 


188 

the  Senior  Proctor,     Senates-consult.  Dec.  1721. 
Lib.  Stat.  p. 


A  Bachelor  of  Arts  of  four  years  standing 
may  be  admitted  to  this  degree.  Stat.  EK».  12. 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  232. 

His  Exercise  is  one  Act,  which  he  keeps 
in  a  full  sleeved  gown,  and  the  hood  of  a  Bachelor 
of  Arts. 

He  is  not  required  to  attend  the  Lectures 
of  the  Professor  of  Civil  Law. 

A  Candidate  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Laws  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes5  in  the  Registrary's  book. 

He  attends  the  first  Congregation  in  a  full 
sleeved  gown  and  the  hood  of  a  Bachelor  of 

Arts. 

His  Supplicat  (see  ante,  p.  138.)  and  the  Cer- 
tificates of  standing,  residence,  attendance  on  the 
Professor's  Lectures,  having  declared  for  Law,  and 
passed  the  Previous  Examination,  are  presented  to 
the  Caput. 

When  his  Supplicat  has  passed  the  Caput, 
it  is  then  read  in  both  Houses. 


5  /,  A.  B.  do  declare  that  I  am  bond  Jide  a  Member  of 
the  Church  of  England  as  by  Law  established.  Lib.  Grat. 
Lambda;  p.  77- 


189 


Before  the  next  Congregation,  he  visits6  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  other  Memhers  of  the 
Caput,  and  the  Doctors  of  the  Faculty. 

He  waits  upon  the  Professor  of  Law  to 
request  him  to  present. 

At  the  second  Congregation  he  attends  in  the 
same  dress,  and  receives  a  copy  of  the  Admission 
Oath  from  the  School-keeper.  See  ante,  p.  169. 

His  Supplicat  is  then  read  a  second  time 
in  hoth  Houses,  and  the  Scrutiny  of 

f  placet 

1  non  placet .  .  . — 

is  marked. 

He  is  presented  by  the  Professor,  or,  in  his 
absence,  by  another  Doctor  of  the  Faculty  to 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  ad  intrandum  in  Jure  Civili. 

If  a  Person,  coming  from  Oxford  or  Dublin 
for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws,  have  taken 
no  degree  previously,  he  must  be  matriculated 
before  his  Supplicat  is  offered.  If  he  be  a  Bache- 
lor of  Arts,  he  is  not  matriculated,  but  incorpo- 
rated. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supre- 
macy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  the 
Oath  of  Admission.  See  ante,  p.  169* 


6  The  visiting  is  now  discontinued,  but  he  asks  of  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  as  he  is  quitting  the  Senate-House,  permission 
to  proceed  to  his  degree. 


190 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors   stand  in 

C  scio 

Scrutiny  of  •<  credo 

I  nescio 

The  Professor  is  brought  to  the  table  by  a 
Bedell,  and  marks  the  scio  line.  The  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  Proctors  usually  mark  the  credo 
line. 

The  Candidate  then  passes  by  the  table,  and 
bows  to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  Professor,  &c. 

He  kneels  before  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  is 
admitted  by  him  ad  intrandum  in  Jure  Civili, 

If  neither  the  Professor,  nor  any  other  Doctor 
in  the  Faculty,  can  be  present  at  the  second 
Congregation,  a  Grace  is  passed  for  allowing  some 
Person  (usually  the  Senior  Proctor)  to  present. 
This  Grace  is  to  be  read  in  two  Congregations. 


Doctor  of 

He  must  be  of  five  years  standing  from  his 
Bachelor's  degree. 

If  he  be  M. A. 7  he  may  be  admitted  at  seven 
years  standing. 

7  A  Master  of  Arts,  who  intends  to  take  the  degree  of 
Doctor  of  Laws,  must  declare  himself  to  the  Vice-Chancellor 
(in  presence  of  the  Registrary)  a  Student  of  Civil  Law,  within 
four  years  from  his  Creation.  If  this  declaration  be  not  made 
by  himself,  the  Person,  who  applies  on  his  behalf,  must  pro- 
duce a  letter  authorizing  the  change  from  the  Divinity  to  the 
Law  Line. 


191 

He  performs  his  Exercises  in  the  habit  of  a 
Non-Regent:  they  are  two  Acts,  and  one  Op- 
ponency. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in  the  Registrary's 
book. 

If  he  have  a  Caution  Grace,  he  goes,  in  the 
habit  of  a  Non-Regent,  with  the  Father  of  his 
College  in  his  hood,  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
Heads,  and  all  the  Doctors  in  the  Faculty,  to 
have  it  signed. 

He  attends  the  first  Congregation  in  the  same 
habit,  when  his  Caution  Grace  and  Supplicat  are 
read  in  the  Caput :  when  passed  there,  they  are 
read  in  both  Houses.  The  Caution  Grace  is  read 
first. 

After  this  Congregation  he  visits8  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  the  rest  of  the  Caput,  the  Heads, 
and  Doctors  in  the  Faculty  ^  and  waits  upon  the 
Professor  of  Law,  (requesting  him  to  present)  in 
the  Non-Regent  habit. 

At  the  next  Congregation  the  Caution  Grace, 
and  Supplicat,  are  read  a  second  time,  in  both 
Houses.  The  Caution  Grace  is  walked  with,  and 
for  the  Supplicat  the  Scrutiny  of 

J  placet 

1  non  placet .  .  .  .  - 

is  marked  in  the  usual  way,  in  both  Houses. 
8  The  visiting  is  now  discontinued. 


192 

He  receives  a  copy  of  his  Admission  Oath 
from  the  School-keeper,  p.  169- 

The  Professor  of  Law,  or  (in  his  ahsence) 
another  Doctor  in  the  Faculty,  presents  him  to 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  ad  incipiendum  in  Jure 
Civili. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  to 
him  the  Oath  of  Admission. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  Proctors  stand 

C  scio •  '     • 

in  Scrutiny  of  <  credo 

I  nescio  .... 

The  Professor  is  brought  to  the  table  by  a 
Bedell,  and  usually  marks  the  scio  line. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors  usually 
mark  the  credo  line. 

He  passes  by  the  table,  and  bows  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  Professor,  &c. 

He  is  admitted  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  ad 
incipiendum  in  Jure  Civili. 

If  neither  the  Professor,  nor  any  other  Doctor 
in  the  Faculty,  can  be  present  at  the  second 
Congregation,  a  Grace  is  passed  for  allowing  some 
other  Person  (usually  the  Senior  Proctor)  to  pre- 
sent. This  Grace  must  be  read  in  two  Congre- 
gations* 


193 


13acf)rlor  of 

A  Candidate  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Physic  may  be  admitted  any  time  after  the  com- 
pletion of  his  fifth  year.  Stat.  Eliz.  15.  Lib, 
Stat.  p.  232. 

He  must  have  resided  the  major  part  of  nine 8 
several  terms,  and  must  produce  to  the  Caput 
a  Certificate  of  such  residence,  under  the  hand 
and  seal  of  the  Master  of  his  College,  or  his 
Locum-tenens.  Deer.  Prefect.  Sept.  19,  1684. 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  504. 

He  must  have  attended  the  Lectures 9  of  the 
Regius  Professor  of  Physic  during  two  Terms, 
and  must  produce  to  the  Caput  a  Certificate  of 
his  having  done  so,  signed  by  the  Professor. 
Senatus-consult.  Jun.  1,  1821. 

He  must  also  produce  to  the  Caput  a  Cer- 
tificate of  his  having  passed  what  is  usually 
called  the  Previous  Examination.  Senatus-con- 
sult. Mart.  13,  1822. 

The  present  Regius  Professor  has  instituted 
an  Examination  of  the  Candidates  for  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Physic  in  the  different  branches 
of  Medical  Science,  viz.  Anatomy,  Physiology, 

8  He  may  be  admitted  to  his  degree  in  the  ninth  Term, 
immediately  after  the  division.     No  excuse  for  non-residence 
on  account  of  illness  is  admitted,  as  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Arts. 

9  These  are  given  in  the  latter  part  of  the  Lent,  and  the 
former  part  of  the  Easter,  Term. 

N 


194 

Pathology,  Nosology,  and  Therapeutics;  and  in 
some  of  the  Classical  Medical  Authors,  as  in  the 
Aphorisms  of  Hippocrates. 

This  Examination  takes  place  before  he  is 
allowed  to  keep  his  Act. 

He  is  required  to  keep  one  Act  and  one  Op- 
ponency;  the  forms  and  ceremonies  attending 
which  are  the  same  as  for  the  exercise  of  a  Ba- 
chelor of  Law.  See  ante,  p.  186. 

If  he  caution  for  the  Opponency,  his  Caution 
Grace  must  be  signed  by  the  Professor,  and  by 
the  Vice-Chancellor  and  a  majority  of  Heads. 

He  applies  for  their  signatures,  dressed  in  a 
full-sleeved  gown,  and  the  Hood  of  a  Bachelor  of 
Arts;  and  is  accompanied  by  the  Father  of  his 
College  in  his  hood. 

If,  on  or  before  the  first  day  of  February  in 
his  fourth  year,  he  did  not  declare,  in  writing, 
to  the  Master  of  his  College,  or  his  Locum-tenens, 
that  it  was  not  his  intention  to  proceed  to  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts1,  he  forfeits  three 
pounds  to  the  University  Chest,  which  sum  is 
paid,  together  with  the  usual  fees,  to  the  Senior 
Proctor.  Senatus-consult.  Dec.  1721.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  412. 

A  Person,  already  Bachelor  of  Arts,  may  pro- 
ceed to  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Physic  after  he 

1  If,  after  this  declaration,  he  proceed  to  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts,  he  also  pays  three  pounds,  beyond  the  usual 
fees,  to  the  Senior  Proctor. 


195 

has  entered  on  his  sixth  year,  provided  he  has 
performed  (or  given  due  Caution  for  the  per- 
formance of)  the  requisite  Exercises,  and  has, 
between  his  Admission  ad  respondendum  quce- 
stioni  and  taking  his  degree,  attended,  during  two 
Terms,  the  Lectures  given  by  the  Professor  of 
Physic;  and  provided  that  one  year  has  intervened 
between  his  final  determination  in  Arts  and  his 
Admission  to  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Physic. 
Senates-consult.  Jan,  1,  1821. 

A  Candidate  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Physic  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  form  (see  ante,  p.  69-)  in  the  Re- 
gistrary's  book. 

He  attends  the  first  Congregation  in  a  full- 
sleeved  gown,  and  the  hood  of  a  Bachelor  of 
Arts, 

His  Supplicat  (see  ante,  p.  139-)>  his  Caution 
Grace  (if  he  have  one),  and  the  Certificates  above- 
mentioned,  are  presented  to  the  Caput. 

When  the  Caution  Grace  and  Supplicat  have 
passed  the  Caput,  they  are  then  read  in  both 
Houses.  Before  the  next  Congregation,  he  visits 2 
the  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  rest  of  the  Caput, 
and  all  the  Doctors  of  the  Faculty. 

He  waits  upon  the  Professor  of  Physic  to  re- 
quest him  to  present, 

2  The  visiting  is  now  discontinued,  but  he  asks  of  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  as  he  is  quitting  the  Senate-House,  per- 
mission to  proceed  to  his  degree. 

N  2 


196 

"At  the  second  Congregation,  the  Caution 
Grace  and  Supplicat  are  read  and  walked  with, 
and  the  Placet  line  marked  in  both  Houses. 

He  receives  from  the  School-keeper  a  copy 
of  his  Admission  Oath.  See  ante,  p.  169. 

He  is  presented  by  the  Professor  of  Physic, 
or  (in  his  absence)  by  another  Doctor  of  the 
Faculty3,  ad  intrandum  in  Medidna. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supre- 
macy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  the 
Oath  of  Admission. 

The  Vice-Chancellor   and  Proctors   stand   in 
cScio  ......  - 

Scrutiny  of     Credo  .....  •  - 


The  Professor  is  brought  to  the  table  by  a 
Bedell,  and  marks  the  Scio  line.  The  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  Proctors  usually  mark  the  Credo 
line. 

The  Candidate  passes  by  the  table  and  bows 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  Professor,  &c. 

He  kneels  before  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  is 
admitted  by  him  ad  intrandum  in  Medidna. 

If  a  Person  from  Oxford  or  Dublin  apply  for 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Physic,  who  has  not 
taken  any  degree  previously,  he  must  be  matri- 
culated before  his  Supplicat,  &c.  are  offered. 

8  If  there  be  no  Professor  or  Doctor  to  present,  a  Grace  is 
passed  for  some  other  Person  (usually  the  Senior  Proctor)  to 
present  ;  which  must  be  read  in  two  Congregations. 


197 

If  he  be  a  Bachelor  of  Arts,  he  is  not  to  be 
matriculated,  but  incorporated. 

His  Exercise  the  same  as  above. 


doctor  of 

He  must  be  of  five  years  standing  from  his 
Bachelor's  degree,  or  seven  years  from  the  degree 
of  Master  of  Arts. 

His  Exercises  are,  two  Acts  and  one  Oppo- 
nency 4. 

He  pays  the  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in  the  Registrar's 
Book. 

He  wears  the  habit  of  a  Non-Regent. 

If  he  Caution  for  any  of  his  Exercises,  he 
carries  his  Caution  Grace  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
the  Heads,  and  all  the  Doctors  in  the  Faculty, 
to  be  signed5. 

He  is  accompanied  by  the  Father  of  the 
College  in  his  hood. 

At  the  first  Congregation,  his  Caution  Grace 
and  Supplicat  are  presented  to  the  Caput,  and 
read  in  both  Houses. 

4  Anatomias  ires,    aut    ad  minimum  duas,    videbit.     Stat. 
Eliz.  17.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  233. 

5  It  is  necessary  that  it  be  signed  by  the  Professor,  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  and  a  majority  of  the  Heads. 


198 

Before  the  next  Congregation,  he  visits7  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  the  rest  of  the  Caput,  the 
Heads,  and  all  the  Doctors  of  the  Faculty. 

At  the  second  Congregation  his  Caution  Grace 
is  read  and  walked  with,  and  then  his  Supplicat 
is  read,  and  the  Placet  line  is  marked  in  the  two 
Houses. 

He  receives  a  copy  of  his  Admission  Oath, 
p.  169- 

He  is  presented  by  the  Professor  of  Physic,, 
or  (in  his  absence)  by  another  Doctor  of  the 
Faculty,  ad  incipiendnm  in  Medicina. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supre- 
macy, and  the  Oath  of  Admission  is  administered 
by  the  Senior  Proctor.  The  Credo  line  is  marked 
by  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors,  and  the 
Professor  marks  the  Scio  line. 

He  passes  the  table,  bowing  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  Professor,  &c.  and  is  admitted  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor  ad  incipiendum  in  Medicina* 


in 

He  is  generally  M.A.  or  B.M.  of  two  years 
standing,  or  more. 

7  The  visiting  is  now  discontinued,  but  he  asks  of  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  as  he  is  quitting  the  Senate-House,  per- 
mission to  proceed  to  his  degree. 


199 

He  is  examined  as  to  his  knowledge  in  Physic, 
by  the  Professor,  or  his  Deputy,  and  usually  by 
another  Doctor  in  Physic,  who  certify  their  ap- 
probation at  the  bottom  of  the  Supplicat. 

f  A  B 

Examinatus  et  approbatus  a  nobis  1  p '  -iV 

He  pays  the  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in  the  Registrar's 
book. 

He  wears  the  habit  of  his  degree:  if  he  be 
of  no  degree  he  wears  a  full-sleeved  gown 8. 

At  the  first  Congregration  the   Supplicat  is 

read  in  the  Caput,  and  in  both  Houses. 
i 

Between  the  first  and  second  Congregations 
he  visits9  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  rest  of 
the  Caput,  and  the  Doctors  in  the  Faculty. 

At  the  second  Congregation  the  Supplicat  is 
again  read  in  both  Houses,  and  the  Scrutiny  of 
placet,  &c.  is  marked. 

A  copy  of  the  Admission  Oath  is  delivered  to 
him.  See  ante,  p.  169. 


8  If  any  man  be  admitted  ad  practicandum  in  Medicina, 
vel  Chirurgia,  who  has  taken  no  previous  degree,  he  is  to  be 
admitted  either  in  a  Fellow-Commoner's  gown,  or  a  mourning 
gown,  and  to  wear  no  hood.     Buck's  Book. 

9  The  visiting  is  now  discontinued,  but  he  asks  of  the 
Vice-Chancellor,   as  he  is  quitting  the  Senate- House,   leave 
to  proceed  to  his  degree,  and  waits  on  the  Professor  to  ask 
him  to  pre^nt  v;™ 


200 

He  is  presented  by  the  Professor,  or  another 
Doctor  in  the  Faculty,  ad  practicandum  in  Me- 
dicina. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supre- 
macy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  to  him 
the  Oath  of  Admission. 

The  Scrutiny  of  scio,  &c.  is  marked  by  the 
Professor,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  Proctors. 

He  passes  by  the  table  and  bows  to  the  Vice- 
Chan  cellor,  the  Professor,  &c. 

He  is  then  admitted,  kneeling,  by  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  ad  practicandum  in  Medicina1. 


ZUftmtatr  in 

See  the  Supplicat  ante  p.  141. 

The  proceedings    are    the    same    as    for  the 
Licence  to  practise  Physic. 


in 

He  must  enter  his  name  in  some  College. 

His   exercise  is   a    solemn    piece    of    Music, 
(Canticum)  of  his  own   composing2,   to  be  per- 

1  The  Diploma,  under  the  seal  of  the  University,  is  pre- 
pared by  the  Registrary, 

1  To  be  examined  by  the  Professor  before  the  performance. 


201 

formed  at  the  appointment  of  the  Vice-Chancellor 
before  the  University.  It  is  usually  performed 
at  St.  Mary's  Church  on  the  Commencement 
Sunday. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  form,  (page  69.)  in  the  Registrary's 
book. 

He  wears  a  full  sleeved  gown  and  a  Bachelor's 
hood3. 

His  Supplicat  at  the  first  Congregation,  is 
passed  in  the  Caput  and  read  in  both  Houses. 

Before  the  next  Congregation  he  visits*  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  rest  of  the  Caput,  and 
the  Doctors  in  the  Faculty. 

At  the  next  Congregation  his  Supplicat 
is  read  a  second  time,  and  the  Scrutiny  of 

(  placet 

i  non  placet . .  . 

is  marked  in  both  Houses. 

He  receives  a  copy  of  the  Admission  Oath, 
from  the  School-keeper,  p.  169. 

3  But  the  regular  way  seems  to  be,  to  ask  leave  in  the 
Supplicat,  for  his  being  presented  in  the  habit  of  a  Bachelor 
of  Arts — proesentetur  in  habitu  Baccalaurel  in  Artibus.     Graf. 
1605,  &c. 

4  The  visiting  is  now  discontinued,  but  he  asks  of  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  as  he  is  quitting  the  Senate-House,  leave  to 
proceed   to   his  degree,  and   waits  on  the   Professor  to  ask 
him  to  present  him. 


202 

I 

A  Grace  passes  for  the  Professor,  or  a  Doctor 
in  Music,  to  enter  to  present.  It  is  read  but 
once,  and  in  the  Regent-House  only. 

The  Professor  or  Doctor,  wearing  the  habit 
of  a  Doctor  of  Law  or  Physic,  presents  him 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor  ad  intrandum  in  Musica. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  to 
him  the  Oath  of  Admission. 

The  Scrutiny  of  Scio,  fyc.  is  marked  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor  and  Proctors. 

He  passes  by  the  table  and  bows  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  Proctors. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  then  admits  him,  kneel- 
ing, ad  intrandum  in  Musica. 

If  there  be  no  Professor  or  Doctor  to  present, 
a  Grace  passes  in  two  Congregations,  authorizing 
another  Person  (usually  the  Senior  Proctor)  to 
do  it. 


factor  in 

He  is  not  obliged  to  be  a  Bachelor  in  Music 
before  he  is  a  Doctor. 

He  must  enter  his  name  in  some  College. 

For  his  Exercise  he  is  to  compose  a  piece 
of  solemn  Music  (Canticum)  to  be  performed 
before  the  University,  at  the  appointment  of  the 


203 

Vice-Chancellor.  The  Music  is  usually  performed 
on  the  Commencement  Sunday  at  St.,  Mary's 
Church,  after  having  been  sent  to  the  Professor 
for  his  inspection. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
goes  to  the  Registrary  to  subscribe  in  his  book. 
See  the  form,  p.  69. 

At  the  first  Congregation  he  is  in  the  habit 
of  a  Non-Regent. 

His  Supplicat  is  read  in  the  Caput,  and  in 
both  Houses. 

Before  the  next  Congregation  he  visits5  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  rest  of  the  Caput, 
and  the  Doctors  in  the  Faculty,  habited  as 
above. 

He  comes  to  the  next  Congregation  in  the 
same  habit,  and  receives  a  copy  of  the  Admission 
Oath,  p.  169. 

A  Grace  passes  for  the  Professor,  or  a  Doctor 
in  the  Faculty,  to  enter  and  present.  If  there 
be  no  Professor  or  Doctor  to  present,  the  Grace 
is  for  another  (usually  the  Senior  Proctor)  to 
do  it. 

If  the  Professor  or  a  Doctor  of  Music  present, 
the  Grace  is  read  but  once,  and  in  the  Regent- 

3  The  visiting  is  now  discontinued,  but  he  asks  of  the 
Vice-Chancellor  as  he  is  quitting,  the  Senate-House,  leave 
to  proceed  to  his  degree,  and  waits  on  the  Professor  to 
ask  him  to  present  him. 


204 

House  only.     If  any  other  Person  present,   the 
Grace  must  be  read  twice,  and  in  both  Houses. 

His  Supplicat  is  read,  and  the  Scrutiny  of. 

j"  placet 

\  nan  placet . .  .  — 

is  marked  in  both  Houses. 

He  is  presented  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  by 
the  Professor,  or  &c.  ad  incipiendum  in  Musica. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  the 
Oath  of  Admission. 

The  Scrutiny  of  Scio,  &c.  is  marked  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  and  Proctors. 

He  walks  past  the  table,  bowing  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  &c. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  admits  him,  kneeling, 
ad  incipiendum  in  Musica. 


A  Person,  applying  for  a  Mandate  degree, 
usually  waits  upon  the  Vice -Chancellor,  and 
states  to  him  the  grounds  of  his  application, 
which  the  Vice-Chancellor  lays  before  the  Heads 
of  Colleges, 


205 

The  Registrary  prepares  a  petition 6  to  the 
Chancellor,  which  a  Bedell  carries  to  be  signed 
by  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads,  a  majority 
of  whose  signatures  must  be  obtained,  before  it 
can  be  presented  to  the  Senate. 

A  Congregation  is  appointed,  and  the  petition, 
with  the  following  Grace  (prepared  by  the  Regis- 
trary) is  presented  to  the  Caput : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  literce  Certtficatorice  modo 
lectce,  ad  Cancellarium  vestrum  transmittantur ; 
literisque  Regiis  proinde  receptis,  et  in  plena 
Congregatione  a  Pro-Cancettario  lectis,  ut  A.  B. 
admittatur  ad  gradum  • . 

6  The  following  is  the  form  of  a  petition  for  the  degree  of 
Master  of  Arts: 

"  We,  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads  of  Colleges  of  the 
"  University  of  Cambridge,  whose  names  are  under- written,  do 
"  hereby  certify  His  Royal  Highness  WILLIAM  FREDERICK, 
ft  Duke  of  Gloucester,  Chancellor  of  the  University  aforesaid, 

"  that  A.  B.,  Bachelor  of  Arts,  of College  in  the  Uni- 

"  versity  aforesaid,  has  been  recommended  to  us,  as  a  Person 
"  of  good  learning  and  morals,  and  properly  qualified  for  the 
"  degree  of  Master  of  Arts,  which  he  is  desirous  of  obtaining, 
"  but  not  being  of  sufficient  standing,  he  cannot  be  admitted 
"  thereto,  without  his  Majesty's  most  Gracious  Letters  Man- 
<{  datory,  dispensing  with  our  Statutes  in  his  behalf: 

"  And  we  do  hereby  certify,  that  his  Majesty's  most 
"  Gracious  Letters  Mandatory,  in  behalf  of  the  said  A.  B. 
"  that  he  may  be  a  Master  of  Arts,  will  be  no  ways  pre- 
"  judicial,  either  to  the  University  in  general,  or  to  any 
"  College  in  particular,  he  paying  the  accustomed  fees,  and 
"  performing  the  accustomed  Exercises,  or  giving  due  caution 
"  for  the  performance  of  the  same. 

"  In  testimony  whereof  we  have  hereunto  set  our  hands 
"  this  —  day  of  ,  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  18  — - ." 


206 

When  it  has  passed  the  Caput,  a  Bedell 
calls  up  the  Houses,  and  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
standing  at  the  back  of  the  chair,  (with  his  cap 
on)  reads  the  petition. 

The  Grace  is  then  read  in  both  Houses. 

At  the  second  Congregation,  the  Houses  are 
called  up  by  a  Bedell,  and  the  petition  is  read 
by  the  Vice-Chan cellor  as  before. 

The  Grace  is  then  read  a  second  time  in  both 
Houses,  and  voted. 

If  it  pass  both  Houses,  a  Bedell  gives  it  to 
the  Chancellor's  Secretary,  who  transmits  it  to 
the  Chancellor,  with  a  Certificate  (prepared  by 
the  Secretary)  in  form  of  an  address  from  the 
Chancellor  to  the  King. 

This  address,  when  signed  by  the  Chancellor, 
is  sent  by  him  to  the  Office  of  the  Secretary 
of  State  for  the  Home  Department,  where  the 
Mandate  is  prepared. 

After  the  Mandate  has  been  signed  by  his 
Majesty,  it  is  returned  to  the  Office  of  the 
Secretary  for  the  Home  Department,  where  the 
Candidate  (or  some  friend  of  his)  is  to  apply 
for  it.  He  then  delivers  it  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
and  requests  him  to  call  a  Congregation  for  his 
Admission  and  Creation. 

He  pays  his  fees  to  the  Senior  Proctor,  and 
subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in  the/ Registrar's 
book. 


207 

At  the  Congregation7,  a  Bedell  calls  up  the 
Houses,  and  the  Vice-Chancellor,  standing  at 
the  back  of  the  chair,  reads  the  Mandate  to 
the  Senate. 

If  the  Candidate  be  an  Undergraduate,  or 
a  Bachelor  of  Arts,  to  be  admitted  to  the  degree 
of  Master  of  Arts,  he  puts  on  a  Bachelor's  hood 
over  his  common  gown. 

He  reads  Greek 8  to  a  Bedell. 

He  is  presented  by  the  Senior  Proctor  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor  in  these  words: 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie 
et  tota  Universitas ;  prcesento  Vobis  hunc  Virum, 
ut  coopletur  in  Ordinem  Magistorum  in  Artibus, 
juxta  tenorem   Hegii  Mandati. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  the 
Oath  of  Admission.  See  ante,  p.  169. 

He  kneels  before  the  Vice-Chancellor,  who 
admits  him,  ad  incipiendum  in  Artibus,  juxta 
tenorem  Regii  Mandati,  in  nomine  Patris,  et 
Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 

He  then  puts  on  the  gown  and  hood  of 
a  Master  of  Arts,  and  is  created  by  the  Senior 
Proctor,  in  the  usual  manner.  See  the  pro- 
ceedings on  Commencement  Tuesday,  p.  125. 

7  Which  is  always  fixed  on  the  earliest  day  possible. 

8  This  is  now  discontinued. 


208 

The  following  Grace  (prepared  by  the  Regis- 
trary)  is  read  in  the  Regent-House  only: 

A.  B.  petit  a  Vobis  mensis  absentiam. 

If  the  Person  be  a  Candidate  for  the  degree 
of  Doctor  of  Divinity,  and  is  not  already  a  Bache- 
lor in  that  Faculty,  he  is  first  presente<J  (wearing 
the  habit  of  a  Non-Regent)  to  the  Proctors  sitting 
in  the  Non-Regent  House,  by  the  Regius  Pro- 
fessor l  of  Divinity,  or  (in  his  absence)  by  another 
Doctor  in  that  Faculty,  in  the  following  words : 

Dignissimi  Domini  Procuratores  et  fata  Uni- 
versitas ;  prcesento  Vobis  Referendum  hunc  Virum, 
ut  admittatur  ad  opponendum  in  Sacra  Theologia, 
juxta  tenorem  Regii  Mandati. 

He  then  kneels  before  the  Senior  Proctor, 
who  taking  his  hands  between  his  own,  says : 

Authoritate  Nobis  commissa,  nos  admittimus 
te  ad  opponendum  in  Sacra  Theologia  juxta  teno- 
rem Regii  Mandati,  in  nomine  Patris,  et  Filii,  et 
Spiritus  Sancti. 

He  is  then  presented  by  the  Professor  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor  in  these  words: 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie9 
et  tota  Universitas,  presento  Vobis  J^enerabilem 

1  Dr.  Brown,  during  a  vacancy  of  the  Professorship  of 
Divinity,  was  presented  and  created  by  Dr.  Gordon,  Oct.  1, 
1771-  Grace  Book,  Kappa,  p.  515. 

Dr.  Watson  was  presented,  and  created,  by  Dr.  Gordon, 
Oct.  14,  1771-  Grace  Book,  Kappa,  p.  517. 

No  Grace  is  necessary  for  this  purpose. 


209 

hunc  Virum,  ut  admittatur  ad  incipiendum  in  Sacra 
Theologia,  juxta  tenor  em  Regii  Mandati. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supre- 
macy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  to  him 
the  Oath  of  Admission,  p.  169. 

He  kneels  before  the  Vice-Chancellor2,  who 
admits  him  in  the  following  words : 

Authoritate  mihi  commissa,  admitto  te,  tarn 
ad  incipiendum  in  Sacra  Theologia,  quam  ad  in- 
terpretandum  et  profitendum,  universam  Sacram 
Scripturam,  juxta  tenorem  Regii  Mandati,  in 
nomine  Patris,  et  Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti. 

This  done,  he  puts  on  a  Doctor's  cope,  and 
is  created  Doctor,  in  the  same  form  as  is  used 
at  the  Commencement.  See  ante,  p.  1211. 

If  he  be  B.D.,  he  is  presented  in  a  Doctor's 
cope,  and  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  only,  and  is 
admitted  by  him  only,  ad  interpretandum  et  pro- 
Jitendum  universam  Sacram  Scripturam,  juxta 
tenorem  Regii  Mandati.  After  which  he  is 
created  as  above. 

Doctors  of  Law,  Physic,  and  Music,  are 
presented  by  their  .respective  Professors,  ad  incipi- 
endum in  Jure  Civili,  Medicina,  Musica,  with 
the  addition  of  the  words,  juxta  tenorem  Regii 
Mandati. 

2  If  a  Vice-Chancellor  is  to  be  admitted  to  any  degree, 
a  Grace  passes  for  his  admission  by  another.  See  the  Grace 
July  29,  174&,  for  the  admission  of  Dr.  Chapman  by  Dr.  Wil- 
cox.  Lib.  Graf.  Kappa,  p.  115. 

O 


810 

The  Admissions  have  the  same  addition. 

Doctors  are  created  by  their  respective  Pro- 
fessors, immediately  after  Admission.  The  Pro- 
fessors of  Divinity,  Law,  and  Physic,  usually 
deliver  a  speech  on  the  occasion. 

A  Grace  (read  in  the  Regent-House  only) 
passes  for  a  month's  absence. 

A  Mandate  degree  may  be  applied  for,  or 
conferred,  during  the  time  of  non-Term. 

In  this  case  the  Vice-Chancellor  calls  a  Convo- 
cation. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  appears  in  his  black  gown, 
and  the  Proctors  with  their  hoods  squared. 

The  Caput  is  called,  and  a  Grace  in  English, 
for  changing  the  Convocation  into  a  Congregation, 
is  read  in  the  Caput,  and  in  both  Houses : 

May  it  please  you,  that  this  Convocatian  may, 
immediately,  be  turned  into  a  Congregation. 

This  Grace  having  passed,  the  Vice-Chancellor 
puts  on  his  robes,  and  the  Proctors  their  Congre- 
gation habit,  and  the  proceedings  are  carried  on 
in  the  usual  way. 


Sll 


of  Jiofcietnen,  antr  of  tt)00e  tofto 
to  tfjrir  29igm*  nanquam 


31,  1786.  It  was  determined,  by  an 
Interpretation  of  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads 
of  Colleges,  that  the  following  Persons  are  en- 
titled to  Honorary  degrees:  viz. 

1.  Privy  Counsellors. 

2.  Bishops. 

C  Dukes, 
I  Marquises, 

3.  Noblemen,  <  Earls, 

I  Viscounts, 
\  Barons. 

4.  Sons  of  Noblemen. 

5.  Persons  related  to  the  King's  Majesty  by 
Consanguinity,  or  Affinity  ;  provided  they 
be  also  Honorable. 

6.  The  eldest  Sons  of  such  Persons. 

7.  Baronets  1   are  to  be  entitled  to  the  degree 

8.  Knights  j      of  M.A.  only. 

The  Sons  of  Privy  Counsellors  or  Bishops,  as 
such,  are  not  entitled  to  any  Honorable  degree  by 
the  Statute  (Stat.  Eli%.  21.)  or  the  Interpretation. 
Interpr.  1577.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  322. 

By  a  Grace  May  26,  1791*  it  was  determined, 
that  if  any  one  in  statu  pupillari  laid  claim 

o  2 


212 


to  any  degree  in  right  of  Consanguinity,  or 
Affinity  with  Majesty,  he  must,  in  the  Term 
preceding  his  Admission,  have  explained  the 
ground  of  his  claim,  by  a  writing  subscribed  by 
his  Tutor,  and  sent  to  each  of  the  Masters  or 
Presidents  of  Colleges,  to  be  communicated  by 
them  to  their  respective  Societies.  Lib.  Grat. 
Lambda,  p.  257- 

Whatever  be  the  degree  for  which  the  Person 
is  a  Candidate,  he  is  presented  by  the  Public 
Orator. 

All  the  above  Persons  (before  they  are  ad- 
mitted to  any  degree)  are  to  be  examined3  and 
approved  of,  in  the  same  manner  as  others  who 
are  admitted  ad  Respondendum  Qutzstioni ;  but 

8  Quum  in  Caplte  Vicesimo  primo  Statutorum  Regince 
Elizabeths  anno  Duodecimo  Editorum  Nobilibus  et  Nobilium 
Filiis  concedatur,  ut  eorum  Admissio  stet  Us  pro  completis  gradu 
et  forma,  adeo  tamen  ut  penes  nos  arbitrium  sit  Admissionis 
conditiones  illis  prcsscribendi ;  et  quum  plurimum  tarn  ad  Acade- 
mic? honorem,  quam  ad  Juvenum  ipsorum  apud  vos  commorantium 
utilitatem,  intersit,  ut  nemo  ad  gradum  prius  admittatur  quam 
de  ejus  progressu  in  Studiis  Academicis  Vobis  constiterit : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  neque  Nobilibus  neque  Nobilium  Jiliis, 
neque  Us  qui  pro  Nobilibus  habendi  sint  secundum  Interpre- 
tationem  die  Maii  1786  datam,  stet  in  posterum  ipsorum  Ad- 
missio pro  completis  gradu  et  forma,  nisi  prius  eodem  modo 
examinati  fuerint  atque  approbati,  quo  alii  qui  admittantur  ad 
respondendum  Questioni.  Proviso  tamen  ut  illis,  post  novent 
terminos  per  majorem  pariem  cujuslibet  termini  completosf 
(primo  et  ultimo  exceptis),  examinationem  subire  liceat :  Proviso 
quoque,  ne  Me  vestrd  Gratia,  vel  ad  Examinationem  subeundam 
•  astringantur  Juvenes  isti,  quorum  nomina  in  Album  Collegii 

alicujuf 


213 

they  have  the  privilege  of  being  examined  after 
they  have  kept  nine  Terms,  the  first  and  last  ex- 
cepted. 

They  are  then  entitled  to  the  degree  of  Master 
of  Arts. 

One  Congregation  only  is  required. 

The  fees  are  usually  paid  by  the  Father  of 
the  College  to  the  several  Officers  in  the  Senate- 
House. 

The  Nobleman  subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in 
the  Registrar's  book. 

His  Grace  is  drawn  up  in  the  following  form : 

Placet  Vobis  ut  (here  the  name  and  title  of 
the  Person  is  mentioned)  habita  Natalium  ratione, 
cooptetur  in  Ordinem  Magistrorum  in  Artibus, 
stetque  ei  Admissio  ejus  pro  completis  forma  et 
gradu  ? 

It  is  signed  by  the  Public  Orator,  and  by  him 
presented  to  the  Caput. 

When  it  has  passed  the  Caput,  it  is  read  in 
both  Houses,  and  walked  with. 


alicujus  jam  relata  sunt,  vel  tollatur  laudibilis  ista,  quce  semper 
apud  vos  invaluit,  consuetude,  viros  maturioris  cetatist  et  quum 
natalibus  turn  mentis  vel  in  Rempublicam,  vel  in  bonas  literas 
illustres,  gradu  Academico  ornandi,  nulld  terminorum  atque 
exercitiorum  ratione  habita.  Senatus-consult.  Mart.  18,  1825. 


The  Nobleman  then  puts  on  the  habit  of  a 
Regent,  and  waits  for  the  Orator  at  the  bottom 
of  the  Senate-House. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  takes  the  chair,  and  the 
Orator,  preceded  by  a  Bedell,  goes  to  the  Person 
to  be  presented,  who  returns  with  him. 

When  they  are  at  a  convenient  distance  from 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Orator  makes  his  speech, 
at  the  conclusion  of  which  he  takes  the  Nobleman 
by  his  right-hand,  and  presents  him  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  in  the  following  words : 

Dignissime  Domine,  Domine  Pro-Cancellarie, 
et  iota  Universitas ; 

Praesento  Vobis  Honor dbilem  hunc  Virum 
(eel,  ingenuum  hunc  Juvenem)  ut,  habiter  Na- 
tedium  ratione,  cooptetur  in  Ordinem  Magis- 
trorum  in  Artibus.  Stetque  ei  Admissio  ejus 
pro  completis  forma  et  gradu. 

The  Nobleman  follows  the  Vice-Chancellor 
to  the  table,  and,  standing  at  his  right-hand,  takes 
the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  then,  taking  the  Noble- 
man by  his  right-hand,  says : 

Domine,  dabis  Fidem,  in  verbo  Honoris,  de 
observandis,  et  defendendis,  Privilegiis,  Liber- 
tatibus  et  Consuetudinibus  approbatis,  hujus 
Academic  Cantdbrigiensis :  teque  eidem  futurum 
benevolum,  quoad  mxeris. 


215 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  still  holding  the  Noble- 
man's right-hand  says: 

Domine,  Nos  A.  B.  Alma  Academics  Can- 

tabrigiensis    Pro-Cancellarius,    authoritate,    qua 

fungimur,  admittimus  te  in  Ordinem  Magistrorum 

in  Artibus ;  in  nomine  Patris,  et  Filii,  et  Spiritus 

Sancti. 

The  above  is  the  form,  in  which  those  are  ad- 
mitted to  their  degrees,  who  were  entered  as 
Noblemen  on  their  first  coming  to  the  Univer- 
sity. 

Those,  who  were  not  originally  entered  as 
Noblemen,  take  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and 
Supremacy,  and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers 
to  them  the  Oath  of  Admission. 

They  are  then  admitted  (kneeling)  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  in  the  usual  form,  but  there  is 
no  Creation,  nor  Grace  for  a  month's  absence. 

A  Nobleman,  taking  the  degree  of  Doctor 
of  Divinity,  is  presented  in  a  Cope. 

If  he  take  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Laws,  or 
Physic,  he  is  presented  in  the  robes  worn  by 
Doctors  in  these  Faculties. 

After  Admission  he  wears  the  black  gown 
belonging  to  his  degree. 

The  forms  of  presentation,  &c.  are  the  same 
as  those  observed  when  Noblemen  take  the  degree 
of  Master  of  Arts. 


216 

Though  no  person  can  claim  a  degree  in  right 
of  Nobility,  who  has  not  previously  undergone  the 
usual  examination,  yet  the  University  reserves  to 
itself  the  right  of  conferring  degrees  (without 
either  examination  or  residence)  on  such  Indi- 
viduals, as  are  illustrious,  not  on  account  of  their 
birth  only,  but  on  account  of  the  services  they 
have  rendered  to  the  State,  or  to  Literature. 
See  ante,  p.  212. 

No  Person,  taking  a  degree  in  right  of  No- 
bility, is  entitled  to  a  vote,  unless  he  shall  pre- 
viously have  resided  three  Terms4. 

Persons  may  be  admitted  to  their  degrees  as 
Nobiles,  or  tanquam  Nobiles,  out  of  Term-time5; 
in  which  case  the  Convocation  is  turned  into  a 
Congregation.  See  the  manner  of  proceeding, 
p.  210. 

JuniiZG",  1826. 

4  Cum  Senatus-Consultum  Jan.  24,  1766,  concessum,  omnino 
taceat  de  Us  qui  gradum  suscipiant  nullis  terminis  completis: 
cumque  haud  cequum  videatur  ut  majora  privilegia  Us  concedantur, 
qui  neque  in  hdc  neque  in  alia  quavis  Academia  commorati  sunt, 
quam  nostris  Alumnis  qui  omnibus  exercitiis  Academicis  perfuncti 
nomina  sua  tabulis  Collegiorum  subduxerint,  aut  quam  Us  qui  ab, 
Oxonio  vel  Dubllnio  hue  se  contulerunt : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  in  posterum  nemo  Gradum  quemque  sus- 
cipiens  ad  jus  suffragii  admittatur,  qui  non,  vel  ante  vel  post 
gradum  susceptum,  ires  saltern  terminos  compleverit,  nisi  qui  in 
Officium  Academicum  vel  Lecturam  Publicamt  vel  in  Funda* 
tionem  alicujus  Collegii  electus  Juerit. 

*  Interpret.  Aug.  22,  16?3.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  345. 


217 


^corporation  of  a  fter*on  from  ©xforfc 
or 


He  must  be  admitted  into  some  College  in 
this  University. 

He  pays  the  fees  to  the  Registrary,  and  sub- 
scribes the  36th  Canon. 

He  pays  his  Incorporation  fee  to  the  Senior 
Proctor. 

He  appears  at  the  Congregation  in  the  habit 
belonging  to  his  degree. 

A  printed  form  of  the  Incorporation  Oath  is 
delivered  to  him  by  the  School-keeper. 

His  Grace  for  Admission  ad  eundem  (see  the 
form,  p.  143.)  is  read  in  the  Caput,  and  in  both 
Houses. 

He  is  presented  to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  if 
Bachelor  of  Arts,  or  Master  of  Arts,  by  the 
Senior  Proctor;  if  of  any  other  Faculty,  by  the 
Professor,  or  any  other  Doctor  of  the  same  Fa- 
culty. See  the  form,  p.  151. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Senior  Proctor  administers  to 
him  the  following  Oath  : 

Jurabis,  quod  observabis  Leges,  Statuta,  Pri- 
vilegia,  et  Consuetudines,  hujus  Academice  Can- 
tabrigiensis,  quatenus  non  contrariantur  Legilns, 


218 

Statutis,  Privilegiis,  et  Consuetudinibus,  Academics 

(  Oxoniensis. 
vestrce  \  ^  7  7.  . 

(Dubhmensis. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evangelia. 

He  kneels  before  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  is 
admitted  in  the  following  words  : 

Authoritate  mihi  commissa,  admitto  te,  ut  sis 
iisdem  anno,  ordine,  et  gradu,  apud  nos  Canta- 

7   •   •  -7  j  .         f  Oxonienses. 

bngienses,  quibus  es  apud  tuos   \  T)  M-  • 


atr  ii?untJrm 

A  Person,  from  Oxford  or  Dublin,  to  be 
admitted  ad  eundem,  without  being  incorporated, 
is  not  required  to  be  admitted  into  any  College 
of  this  University. 

He  pays  a  fee  to  the  Registrary,  and  sub- 
scribes the  36th  Canon. 

A  Grace  for  his  Admission  (see  the  form, 
p.  143.)  is  read  in  the  Caput,  and  in  both 
Houses. 

He  appears  in  the  habit  of  his  degree. 

He  is  presented  to  the  Vice-Chan  cellor,  if 
Bachelor  of  Arts,  or  Master  of  Arts,  by  the 
Senior  Proctor;  if  of  any  other  Faculty,  by 
the  Professor,  or  by  any  other  Doctor  of  that 
Faculty.  See  the  form,  p.  151. 

He  is  admitted  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  ut 
sit  iisdem,  anno,  cc. 


219 

Diploma  unto?  ttje  Common  £*al  for 
Drgrrr. 

The  following  Grace,  for  setting  the  University 
Seal,  is  presented  to  the  Caput,  and  read  in 
both  Houses  in  two  Congregations: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  A.  B.  Liter  as  hdbeat  testi- 
moniales  gradus  sui9  Sigillo  vestro  Communi 
sigillatas. 

Leave  for  setting  the  Seal  to  the  Diploma 
of  a  Person  licensed  to  practice,  in  Physic,  or 

Surgery,  is  asked  in  the   Supplicat atque 

ut  super  hac  Concessione  vestra,   literas  hdbeat 
testimonials,  Sigillo  vestro  Communi  sigillatas. 


FORM  S 


OF 


ELECTING   THE   OFFICERS 


OP 


FORMS 


OF 


ELECTING   THE    OFFICERS 


OF    THE 


UNIVERSITY 


Election  of  a  <£fjancfilor. 

THE  following  proceedings  took  place  in  the  year 
one  thousand,  eight  hundred  and  eleven,  in 
consequence  of  the  Vacancy  of  this  Office 
occasioned  by  the  death  of  his  Grace  the 
Duke  of  Grafton. 


The  Vice-Chancellor  appointed  a  Congregation 
on  the  sixteenth  of  March,  to  give  notice  of 
the  day  of  Election,  which  must  take  place 
within  fourteen  days  after  the  vacancy  is  certainly 
known.  Stat.  Eli%.  33.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  241. 

At  this  Congregation  the  Senior  Proctor  gave 
the  following  notice: 


Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius  certior  factus  de 
morte  Illustrissimi  Augusti  Henrici  Duels  de 
Graf  ton,  palam  notumfacit  Munus  Cancellariatus 
jam  vacare,  et  assignat  horam  nonam  diet  vigesimi 
sexti  instantis  Mensis  pro  Electione  Cancellarii 
hujus  Academics. 

At  a  Congregation  held  on  the  twenty-second 
of  March  the  following  Grace  was  passed : 

Placeat     Vobis,    ut    si  qui    Scholares,    ante 

Diem  Electioni  Cancellarii  assignatum,  Electorum 

hue  commigrantium    commodo    consulentes,    cum 

Tutorum  consensu  ex  Academia  egressi  fuerint9 

prcesentem  terminum  complevisse  teneantur. 

On  the  day  of  Election  a  Bedell  read  the 
33d  Stat.  Eli%.  De  Electione  Cancellarii.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  241. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  the  two  Proctors,  and 
the  Junior  Doctor  in  Divinity  present  (if  there 
had  been  no  Doctor  in  Divinity  present,  then 
the  Junior  Doctor  of  Law  or  Physic  would 
have  supplied  his  place)  stood  in  Scrutiny,  and 
first  gave  their  votes  written  in  the  following 
form : 

A.  B.    digit in   Cancellarium   hujus 

Academics . 

A  Bedell  then  called,  ad  Scrutinium  pro 
Electione  Cancellarii. 

The  other  Electors  then  brought  up  their 
votes  written  in  the  same  form. 


Each  of  the  Candidates  had  a  Person  standing 
at  the  table  on  his  behalf. 

A  Bedell  called  at  certain  intervals  by  direction 
of  the  Vice-Chancellor, 

* 

Ad  Scrutinium  secundo: 

Ad  Scrutinium  ultimo: 
and,  when  the  Poll  was  closed  by  consent, 

Cessatum  est  a  Scrutinio. 
On  casting  up  the  votes  the  numbers  were, 
His  Royal  Highness  the  Duke  of  Gloucester  468. 
His  Grace  the  Duke  of  Rutland 351. 

The  Senior  Proctor  then  went  to  his  place, 
and  (the  Junior  standing  by  him)  read  one  vote 
for  the  Duke  of  Rutland  at  full  length,  of  the 

others  he  merely  said,  Eundem  eligit  A.  B. 

Eundem  eligit  C.  D.  fyc. 

When  he  had  finished  them  all,  he  read  the 
votes  for  the  Duke  of  Gloucester  in  the  same 
manner,  and  at  the  conclusion  said, 

Ego  A.  B.  Senior  Procurator  hujus  Aca- 
demic, (eligo  et)  electum  a  Vobis  pronuncio 
Celsissimum  Principem  Gulielmum  Fredericum 
Ducem  de  Gloucester  in  Cancellarium  hujus 
Academic. 

At  a  Congregation  held  on  the  twenty-ninth 
of  March,  a  Latin  Letter,  (written  by  the  Public 
Orator)  addressed  to  the  Chancellor  Elect  in 

P 


the  name  of  the  Senate,  was  read  in  full  Con- 
gregation. 

The  following  Grace  was  then  offered : 
Placeat  Tobis,  ut  Literce  modo  lectce,  rescri- 
bantur ;  Sigitto  vestro  usitato  sigillentur ;   et  ad 
Celsissimum  Cancellarium  prcesententur. 

The  following  Grace  was  also  offered : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Celsissimus  Princeps  Guliel- 
mus  Fredericus  Dux  de  Gloucester  modo  electus 
ad  Qfficium  sive  Munus  Cancellarii  hujus  Aca- 
demiee,  Literds  hdbeat  patentes  ejusdem  Qfficii, 
sive  Muneris,  Sigillo  vestro  Communi  sigillatas. 

At  a  Congregation  held  on  the  third  of  Mai/ 
the  following  Grace  was  passed: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Senaculum  Musicis  con- 
cedatur  Comitiis  proxime  instantibus. 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius, 
Reverendissimus  Episcopus  Bristoliensis,  Doctor 
Davy,  Doctor  Jowett,  Magist&r  D'Oyly,  et  Ma- 
gister  Walter,  Syndici  vestri  constituantur,  qm 
Senaculum  optime  instructum  et  accomodatum 
reddant,  pro  Inauguration  Celsissimi  Principis 
Cancellarii  vestri  Electi. 

On  the  twentieth  of  June  the  following  Grace 
was  passed: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magistris  infra  nominatis, 
plena  concedatur  potestas  Procuratoria,  ab  hoc 
die  usque  in  ultimum  hujus  termini  diem,  tarn 
in  Senatu  quam  extra  Senatum  si  opus  fuerit 


S27 

exercenda;  iisdemque  per  omnia  obedientiam 
prcestare  teneantur  Scholastici  ipsis  Procura* 
toribus  debitam : 


Magister  Tavel, 
Magister  Hudson 


\  Coll.  Trin. 

'9  3 

Magister  Wood, 


„     .         T    .         .    Coll.Joh. 
Magister  Jackson, 

Magister  Currey,    Corp.  Chr. 
Magister  Gimingham,    Cai. 
Magister  Barnes,  Regin. 
Magister  Walker,  Aul.  Trin. 
Magister  Caldwell,  Jes* 
Magister  Slade,  Emman. 
Magister  Chafy,   Sid. 
Magister  Tillbrook,  Pet. 


The  following  particulars  relating  to  former 
Elections  of  Chancellors  are  extracted  from  a  book 
in  the  hand-writing  of  the  Rev.  Henry  Hubbard 
(Fellow  of  Emmanuel  College,  and  Registrary 
of  the  University,  in  1758)  described  by  him  as 
being  a  copy  of  "  Buck's  Book  with  additions 
by  John  Peck  and  others."  This  book  is  in  the 
Treasury  of  Emmanuel  College. 

Election  of  the  DUKE  ^BUCKINGHAM,  1671. 

The  Patent  was  ordered  to  be  sent  up  (if 
possible)  with  the  Orator's  letter;  and  both  to 
be  delivered  together  to  the  Duke  by  one  of 
the  Bedells,  p.  243. 

p  2 


228 

The  Election  being  made,  the  Vice-Chancellor 
presently  sent  Mr.  William  Worts,  Esquire  Bedell, 
with  letters  written  by  himself,  and  others  written 
by  the  Orator  from  the  University,  to  give  his 
Grace  notice  of  the  Election,  who  was  pleased 
to  receive  it  kindly,  and  to  reward  the  Bearer 
nobly. 

The  above  is  in  the  hand-writing  of  Dr.  Bretton, 
Master  of  Emmanuel,  and  Vice- Chancellor  at  the  time  of 
the  Election,  p.  246. 

Election  of  the  DUKE  o/*  NEWCASTLE,  1748. 

Orator's  Letter  delivered  by  Mr.  Burrough, 
Esquire  Bedell,  p.  254. 

Mr.  Burrough  afterwards  delivered  the  Patent 
to  his  Grace,  together  with  a  copy  of  the  Statutes, 
p.  255. 


This  Officer  is  appointed  by  the  Chancellor's 
Letters  Patent. 


The   Election  is  by   Grace,   which  must  be 
read  in  two  Congregations. 

The  following  form  is  taken  from  Buck's  Book: 
Cum  Seneschalli  Munus  per  ,  Honora- 

tissimi,  <%c.  vacuum  sit; 


Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Ornatissimus  Vir  Do  minus 
suffragiis  vestris  dictum  Officium,  sub 
Llteris  vestris  patentibus9  Sigitto  vestro  Communi 
sigillatis  habeat  et  exequatur ;  et  ut  foedum  qua- 
tuor  librarum  hujusmodi  Muneri  destinatum,  quot- 
annis  per  manus  Domini  Pro-Cancettarii  re- 
cipiat. 

When  an  Election  took  place  in  consequence 
of  the  resignation  of  the  Duke  of  Newcastle, 
who  had  been  chosen  Chancellor,  the  following 
form  was  made  use  of: 

Cum  Illustrissimus  Princeps  THOMAS  HOLLES 
Dux  de  Newcastle,  Cancellarius  vester  Dignissi- 
mus,  Qfficio  sive  Munere  Summi  hujus  Academics 
Seneschalli  se  nuper  in  pleno  Senatu  abdicaverit; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ne  quid  detrimenti  Respublica 
capiat,  ut  in  ianti  Viri  locum  auctoritatemque 
pleno  jure  succedat  Honor atissimus  Dominus 
Philippus  Baro  de  Hardwicke,  Summus  Magnce 
Britannia  Cancellarius,  atque  ita  quidem  ut 
Literis  etiam  vestris  patentibus,  uti  vocant,  in- 
structus  inauguratusque,  excellenti  deinceps  Mu- 
nere defungatur,  et  stipendium  per  leges  et 
consuetudines  antiquas  dejinitum,  quotannis  acr 
cipiat.  Lect.  et  Concess.  Jul.  5.  1749. 

The  letter,  written  by  the  Public  Orator 
in  the  name  of  the  University,  announcing  the; 
Election,  was  delivered  to  him  by  Mr.  Burrough, 
the  Senior  Esquire  Bedell,  Extract  from  Rev. 
H.  Hubbard's  Book. 


230 


He  is  appointed  by  Letters  Patent  from  the 
High  Steward,  and  confirmed  by  a  Grace  of  the 
University. 

14  Apr.  1722.  Cum  Honoratissimus  An- 
THURUS,  COMES  de  ANGLESEY,  hujus  Univer- 
sitatis  Summus  Seneschallus,  per  literas  suas 
patentes  Officium  Sub-Seneschalli,  Johanni  Eaby 
Armigero  concesserit ; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  ista  Concessio  vestra  autori- 
tate  rata  slat.  Lib.  Grat.  Iota,  p.  61. 

1718. ut    hcec    Concessio9   tarn  pro 

executione  ejusdem  Qfficii,  quam  pro  receptione 
Stipendii,  fit  vestra  autoritate  rata.  Lib.  Grat. 
Theta,  p.  686. 


of 

The  Sheriff  sends  the  precept  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  and  the  Election  is  to  commence 
within  eight  days  from  the  receipt  of  it. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  gives  four  days  notice, 
at  least,  of  the  Election,  at  a  Congregation,  or 
a  Convocation. 

At  this  Congregation,  or  Convocation,  the 
Senior  Proctor  reads  the  precept. 

He  publishes  the  following  notice: 


231 


jDominus    Pro-Cancellarius    assignat    horam 

diet pro  Electione  duorum  Bur- 

gensium  hujus  Academics  in  Parliamento. 

At  the  time  of  Election  the  Senior  Proctor 
reads  the  precept,  and  the  Statute  against 
bribery,  &c.  Stat.  Z.  Geo.  II.  cap.  24. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  takes  the  Oath  of  return- 
ing Officer  (prepared  for  him  by  the  Registrary) 
before  a  Justice  of  the  Peace,  or  three  Electors, 
who  must  attest  it. 

The  two  Proctors,  and  the  Junior  Doctor  in 
Divinity  present,  stand  in  Scrutiny  with  the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

Each  Candidate  has  usually  a  Person  standing 
at  the  table  on  his  part. 

A  Bedell  calls,  ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
duorum  Burgensium  hujus  Academic. 

The  votes  are  brought  up  together,  written  on 
separate  papers,  in  this  form : 

A.  B.  (insert  the  degree)  Coll.  — — .  eligit 
C.  D.  in  Burgensem  hujus  Academic  in  Parlia- 
mento. 

At  the  Election  in  June  1826  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor appointed  a  Poll-Clerk,  who  took  the 
prescribed  Oath. 

The  votes  were  delivered  to  one  of  the  Proc- 
tors, who  read  them  aloud;  they  were  copied 
into  the  Poll-book  by  the  Clerk,  and  given  to 


the  Vice-Chancellor,  who  put  them  into  a  box 
placed  on  the  table  for  that  purpose. 

The  Poll-book  was  constantly  in  the  custody 
of  the  Vice-Chancellor. 

The  Poll  commenced  on  Tuesday  the  thirteenth 
of  June,  at  eight  o'clock  in  the  morning,  continued 
on  the  Wednesday  and  the  Thursday,  and  finally 
closed  on  the  Friday  at  one  o'clock  in  the  after- 
noon. 

The  votes  were  cast  up,  and  the  numbers  for 
each  Candidate  announced,  whenever  an  adjourn- 
ment took  place. 

At  the  final  close  of  the  Poll,  the  numbers 
were  stated  from  the  Poll-book,  and  the  successful 
Candidates  were  declared  duly  elected. 

The  return  is  made  in  the  following  manner : 

The  Kegistrary  goes  to  the  Vice-Chancellor's 
table,  and  takes  with  him  the  Indenture  of  Return, 
which  is  signed,  sealed,  and  delivered  by  the 
Electors  therein  named,  before  two  Witnesses, 
who  are  not  Members  of  the  Senate. 

The  Electors,  mentioned  in  the  Indenture, 
are  six  in  number ;  the  two  Proctors  are  usually 
amongst  them. 

The  Registrary  endorses  the  Precept  thus : 
The  execution  of  this  Precept  appears  in  the 
Schedule  hereunto  annexed. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  signs  the  endorsement. 


233 

The  Precept  is  affixed  to  the  Indenture  of 
Return,  and  they  are  delivered  by  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor  to  the  Sheriff,  or  his  Deputy. 

The  Sheriff  executes  the  counterpart  of  the 
Return,  and  delivers  it  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
who  gives  it  to  the  Registrary. 

STATEMENT  of  CONTESTED  ELECTIONS  for 
REPRESENTATIVES  in  PARLIAMENT  from 
1780  to  the  present  time. 

September  9,  1780. 

For  Two.  Representatives. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

James  Mansfield,  Esq.  M.A.  King's 277 

Hon.  John  Townshend,  M.A.  St.  John's.  .  .  237 

Lord  Hyde,  M.A.  St.  John's 206 

Richard  Croftes,  Esq.  M.A.  St.  John's.  ...  150 

Hon.  William  Pitt,  M.A.  Pembroke. ....  142 

The  number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  546. 


April  3,  1784. 

For    Two    Representatives. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

Rt.  Hon.  William  Pitt,  M.A.  Pembroke.  .  .  351 

Earl  of  Euston,  M.A.  Trinity.  . 299 

Hon.  John  Townshend,  M.A.  St.  John's.  .  .  278 

James  Mansfield,  Esq.  M.A.  King's 181 

The  number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  588. 


234 

June  17,  1790. 

For  Two  Representatives. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

Rt.  Hon.  William  Pitt,  M.A.  Pembroke.  .  .    510 

Earl  of  Euston,  M.A.  Trinity 483 

Lawrence  Dundas,  Esq.  M.A.  Trinity 207 

The  number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  684. 


February  7,  1806. 
For   ONE    Representative. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

Lord  Henry  Petty,  M.A.  Trinity 331 

Lord  Viscount  Althorp,  M  A.  Trinity 145 

Lord  Viscount  Palmerston,  M.A.  St.  John's.     128 

The  number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  604. 


May  8,  1807. 

For  Two  Representatives. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

Earl  of  Euston,  M.A.  Trinity 324 

Sir  Vicary  Gibbs,  M.A.  King's '.  312 

Lord  Viscount  Palmerston,  M.A.  St.  John's.  310 

Lord  Henry  Petty,  M.A.  Trinity 265 

The  number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  631. 


235 

March  27,  1811. 

For   ONE    Representative. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

Lord  Viscount  Palmerston,  M.  A.  St.  John's.     451 
John  Henry  Smyth,  Esq.  M.A.  Trinity .  .  .     345 

The  number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  796. 


November  26  and  27, 
For  ONE  Representative. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

William  John  Bankes,  Esq.  M.A.  Trinity.  .     419 

Lord  Hervey,  M.A.  Trinity 281 

James  Scarlett,  Esq.  M.A.  Trinity 219 

The  number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  919. 


Jtme  13,  14,  15,  and  16,  1826. 

For  Two  Representatives. 

Numbers 
Candidates.  Polled. 

Right  Hon.  Sir  J.  S.  Copley,  M.A.  Trinity.  776 

Lord  Viscount  Palmerston,  M.A.  St.  John's.  631 

William  John  Bankes,  Esq.  M.A.  Trinity. .  509 

Rt.  Hon.  Henry  Goulburn,  M.A.  Trinity. .  439 

The  Number  of  Voters  at  this  Election  was  1297- 


2S& 


The  Vice-Chancellor  appoints  a  Congregation, 
or  a  Convocation,  for  giving  notice  of  the  vacancy, 
and  the  day  of  Election. 

The  Election  must  take  place  within  fourteen 
days  after  the  Vacancy  is  known  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor. 

If  there  be  a  Certificate  of  the  Resignation 
of  the  Office,  it  is  read  by  the  Senior  Proctor. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  notice  of 
the  day  of  Election  in  the  following  form : 

Dominus  Pro-Cancellarim,  certior  factus  Qffi- 

cium  Prceconis  Armigeri  jam  vacare  per , 

assignat  horam diet pro  Electione 

novi  Prceconis. 

At  nine  o'clock  in  the  morning  of  the  day 
immediately  preceding  the  Election,  the  Heads 
of  Colleges,  or  their  Representatives,  meet  in  the 
Senate-House,  to  nominate  and. prick  two  Persons 
to  be  returned  to  the  Senate. 

A  Bedell  reads  the  40th  Statute  of  Elizabeth, 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  251.  De  Nominatione  et  Electione 
Lectorum,  &c.  and  a  part  of  the  34th  Statute, 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  242.  De  Electione  Pro-Cancellarii, 
viz.  from  the  beginning  to  the  word  Electio. 

He  writes  the  following  form : 
Nominati  in  Officium  Bedelli  Armigeri  hujus 
Academics  sunt — 


The  Heads,  &c.  according  to  their  Seniority, 
nominate  such  Persons  as  they  think  fit. 

The  Bedell  reads  the  nominati,  and  draws  lines 
against  each  name. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  two  Senior 
Doctors6  present,  stand  in  Scrutiny,  and  the 
rest  of  the  Heads,  &c.  retire  from  the  table. 

The  Junior  of  the  Company  goes  to  the  table, 
and  pricks  two  of  the  names,  or,  if  he  chooses,  only 
one. 

The  other  Heads,  &c.  do  the  same,  according 
to  their  Juniority. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  pricks  last7. 

The  Bedell  writes,  on  the  same  paper,  and 
publishes,  the  names  of  the  two  Persons  who 
have  the  greater  number  of  votes  : 

Nominati^  et  punctis  notati  in  Qfficii(m  Bedelli 
Armigeri  hujus  Academics  sunt, 

A.  B.  Coll. 

C.  D.  Coll. H 

At  the  time  of  the  Election,  a  Bedell  reads 
the  40th  Statute  of  Elizabeth,  and  part  of  the 


6  If  no  Doctor  be  present,  the  two  Senior  Bachelors  in 
Divinity  stand  in  Scrutiny. 

7  If  several  Candidates  be  nominated,  and  an  equality  of 
votes  should  happen  for  two  or  more  Persons,  the  Regius 
Professor   in   Divinity   determines   which   of  them  is   to  be 
returned  to  the  Senate.     Slat.  Eliz.  34,.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  242. 


238 

34th,  viz.  from  the  word  Electio  to  the  end  of 
tHe  Statute. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  nominati  et 
punctis  notati,  &p. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Proctors 
stand  in  Scrutiny.  They  give  their  own  votes, 
written  in  this  form: 

A.  B.  digit  C.  D.  in  JBedellum  Armigerum 
hujus  Academics. 

A  Bedell  calls,  Ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
Bedelli  Armigeri  hujus  Academic. 

The  Noblemen,  Doctors,  Non-Regent  and 
Regent  Masters,  deliver  their  votes,  written  in 
the  above  form,  to  the  Scrutators,  whilst  the 
Bedell  calls,  at  proper  intervals,  Ad  Scrutinium 
sec undo ;  Ad  Scrutinium  ultimo;  and,  after  all 
the  votes  are  given  up,  Cessatum  est  a  Scrutinio. 

The  Senior  Proctor  reads  the  votes,  and  de- 
clares the  election ;  see  the  manner,  p.  49. 

If  there  has  been  a  contest  for  the  Office,  the 
proceedings  are  the  same  as  mentioned  in  p.  50. 

The  Person  elected  goes  to  the  table,  and 
subscribes  the  following  form  in  the  Vice-Chan- 
Chancellor's  book : 

We,  whose  names  are  hereunder  written,  do 
declare  that  we  will  cotiform  to  the  Liturgy  of, 
the  Church  of  England,  as  it  is  now  by  Law 
established. 


239 

He  then  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and 
Supremacy,  and  the  Vice-Chancellor  administers 
to  him  the  Oath  of  Office,  viz. 

Jurdbis  quod  omnes  et  singulas  Ordinationes, 
Qfficium  tuum  concernentes,  pro  parte  tua,  juxta 
vim,  formam,  et  effectum  earundem,  bene  et  fi- 
deliter  observdbis  et  adimplebis. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  Dei  Evan- 
gelia.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  530. 

If  the  notice,  &c.  be  at  a  Convocation,  the 
forms  of  the  Notice,  Nomination,  and  Voting, 
are  in  English. 


tfttfcitc  (Drator, 

The  Vice-Chancellor  appoints  a  Congregation, 
or  a  Convocation,  for  declaring  the  Vacancy,  and 
the  time  of  Election8. 

If  there  be  a  Certificate  of  Resignation,  it  is 
read  by  the  Senior  Proctor. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  following 
notice ; 


8  The  Statute  De  Electione  Oratoris  (Lib.  Stat.  p.  112.) 
enjoins  the  Election  to  take  place  "  Infra  triduum  si  Jieri 
potest,  postquam  vacaverit  Qfficium;"  but  as  this  Office  is  now 
regulated  by  the  40th  Statute,  the  Election  may  take  place 
any  time  within  fourteen  days  after  the  Vacancy  has  been 
made  known  to  the  Vice-Chancellor. 


240 

Dominus     Pro-Cancellarius,     certior   factus 

Qfficium  Oratoris  Publici  jam  vacareper- , 

assigned  horam*— diet pro  Electione 

Oratoris  novi  hujus  Academic. 

At  nine  o'clock  in  the  morning  of  the  day 
immediately  preceding  the  Election,  the  Heads 
of  Colleges,  or  their  Representatives,  meet'in  the 
Senate-House,  to  nominate  and  prick  two  Persons, 
one  of  whom  is  to  be  elected  by  the  Senate. 

Before  the  Nomination  a  Bedell  reads  the 
40th  Statute,  Lib.  Stat.  p.  251.  and  part  of  the 
34th,  Lib.  Stat.  p.  242.  He  then  reads  the 
Statute  De  Oratore  eligendo,  et  ejus  Qfficio. 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  110. 

The  same  order  is  then  observed  in  the  nomi- 
nation and  pricking  as  is  mentioned  p.  236 9. 

,  On  the  day  of  Election  a  Bedell  reads  the 
40th  Statute,  and  part  of  the  34th,  (Seep.  237.) 
and  the  Statute,  De  Oratore  eligendo. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  nominati,  8yc. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Senior 
Doctors,  or  (for  want  of  Doctors)  the  two  Senior 
Bachelors  in  Divinity  present,  stand  in  Scrutiny. 

The  form  of  the  votes  is,  A.  B.  eligit  C.  D.  in 
Oratorem  Publicum  hujus  Academics. 

.  9  If  several  Candidates  be  nominated,  and  an  equality  of 
votes  should  happen  for  two  or  more  Persons,  the  Regius 
Professor  in  Divinity  determines  which  of  them  is  to  be 
returned  to  the  Senate.  Stat.  Eliz.  34,.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  242. 


241 

The  voting  is  as  mentioned  ante,  page  238. 

The  Senior  Proctor  reads  the  votes,  and  de- 
clares the  Election,  in  the  usual  form,  see  p.  49. 

The  Person  elected  puts  on  the  Orator's 
habit1. 

The  Senior  Proctor  reads  to  him  the  Statute 
De  Oratore  eligendo. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Vice-Chancellor  administers 
the  Oath  of  Office.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  530. 

He  subscribes  the  form  in  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor's Book.  See  it,  p.  238. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  delivers  to  him  the 
Orator's  books,  and  he  takes  his  place  on  the 
boards,  on  the  North  side  of  the  Senate-House, 
next  to  the  Doctors. 

If  there  be  an  opposition,  the  mode  of  pro- 
ceeding is,  as  mentioned  page  50. 

If  the  notice,  &c.  be  at  a  Convocation,  the 
forms  are  in  English. 


1  He  wears  a  white  hood,  but  has  the  privilege  of  voting 
either  in  the  Regent  or  Non- Regent  House.  Lib.  Stat. 
p.  112. 


Q 


242 


This  Office  was  founded  December  15,  1721, 
by  the  following  Grace  of  the  Senate,  which  ap- 
pointed the  Rev.  Dr.  Conyers  Middleton,  and  at 
the  same  time  fixed  the  mode  of  future  Elec- 
tions : 

Cum  pro  Regis  Serenissimi  munificentia  tan- 
taque  Bibliothecce  Publics  facta  inde  librorum 
accessione,  tarn  Academics  Dignitas  quam  Qfficii 
ipsius  Magnitude  postulare  plane  videatur,  ut 
prater  Bibliothecarium,  quern  hactenus  unicum 
habuistis,  (brevi  jam  eligendum  solitoque  stipendio 
dignandum)  alter  etiam  superioris  ordinis  tanto 
muneri  prteficiatur : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Reverendus  Vir  Conyers 
Middleton,  S.  T.P.  fide,  moribus,  doctrina  spec- 
tatissimus9  in  perpetuum  vestra  erga  eum  benevo- 
lentice  testimonium,  Proto-jBiblioihecarii  Munere 
primus  honestetur,  utque  stipendium  annuum 
quinquagihta  circiter  librarum  a  Syndicis  infra 
Nominatis  constituendum  habeat,  ut  omnes  de- 
nique  Proto-Sibliothecarii  eodem  modo  in  pos- 
terum  eligantur,  quo  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius. 
Syndici  sunt  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius  Dr.  Jen- 
kyn,  Dr.  Savage,  Mr.  Tillotson,  Mr.  Burford, 
Mr.  Monius,  Mr.  Banyer. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  appoints  a  Congregation, 
or  a  Convocation,  in  which  the  Senior  Proctor 
reads  the  Certificate  of  Resignation,  if  there  be 
one. 


24S 

The  Senior  Proctor  gives  the  following  notice 
of  the  Vacancy,  and  the  time  of  Election : 

Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius9  certior  Jactus  Of- 
ficium,  sive  Munus,  Proto-BiUiothecarii  jam  va- 

cari  per assignat  horam diet  • 

pro    Elections    novi    Proto-BiUiothecarii  hujus 
Academics. 

By  the  authority  of  the  Foundation  Grace, 
the  Heads  of  Colleges,  or  their  Representatives, 
meet  in  the  Senate-House  at  nine  o'clock  in  the 
morning  of  the  day  immediately  preceding  the 
Election,  to  nominate,  and  prick,  two  Persons 
to  be  returned  to  the  Senate. 

A  Bedell  reads  the  40th  Statute  of  Elizabeth, 
and  the  34th,  to  the  word  Electio. 

He  writes  the  following  form: 

Nominati    in    Qfficium    Prozo-Bibliothecarii 
ms  Academia  sunt  — 


The  Heads  and  Representatives,  according  to 
their  Seniority,  nominate  such  Persons  as  they 
think  proper. 

A  Bedell  reads  the  Nominati,  and  draws  lines 
opposite  to  each  name. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Senior  Doc- 
tors present  stand  in  Scrutiny,  and  the  rest  retire 
from  the  table. 

The  Junior  of  the  company  goes  to  the  table, 
and  pricks  two  of  the  names,  or  only  one,  as  he 
thinks  fit. 


244 


The  other  Heads,  &c.  do  the  same  The  Vice- 
Chancellor  pricks  last2. 

The  Bedell  writes  on  the  same  paper,  and 
publishes  the  names  of  the  two  persons  who  have 
the  greater  number  of  votes : 

Nominati,    et  punctis   notati,    in    Qfficium 

f  A  B. 

Proto-BiUiothecarii  hujus  Academic,  sunt  \  /-.'j^ 

At  the  time  of  Election  a  Bedell  reads  the 
40th  Statute,  and  part  of  the  34th  Stat.  Eliz. 
from  the  word  Electio,  to  the  end  of  the  Sta- 
tute. 

The  Senior  Proctor  publishes  the  Nominati 
it  punctis  notati. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  two  Senior 
Doctors  in  Divinity  present,  or,  (in  their  absence) 
the  two  Senior  Bachelors  in  Divinity  present, 
stand  in  Scrutiny.  They  give  their  own  votes 
written  in  this  form: 

A.  B.  digit  C.  D.  in  Proto-Bibliothecarium 
hujus  Academics. 

A  Bedell  calls  ad  Scrutinium  ,pro  Electione 
Proto-Bibliothecarii  hujus  Academice. 

The  Noblemen,  Doctors,  Non-Regent,  and 
Regent  Masters  deliver  their  votes,  written  in 


2  If  several  Candidates  be  nominated,  and  an  equality  of 
votes  should  happen  for  two  or  more  Persons,  the  Regius 
Professor  in  Divinity  determines  which  of  them  is  to  be 
returned  to  the  Senate.  Stat.  Eliz.  34.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  242. 


245 

the  above  form,  to  the  Scrutators,  whilst  the 
Bedell  calls  at  proper  intervals,  Ad  Scrutinium 
secundo;  Ad  Scrutinium  ultimo;  and  after  all 
the  votes  are  given  up,  Cessatum  est  a  Scru~ 
tinio. 

The  Senior  Proctor  writes  his  vote  and  de- 
claration of  Election,  in  the  following  form : 

Ego  A.  B.  Senior  Procurator  hujus  Acade- 
mics (eligo  ef)  a  vobis  electum  pronuncio9  C.  D. 
in  Proto-Bibliothecarium  hujus  Academics. 

He  takes  the  votes  of  the  other  Electors,  and 
his  own  paper,  to  his  place,  and  (the  Junior 
Proctor  standing  by  him)  he  reads  one  vote 
at  length;  and  for  each  of  the  rest  he  says, 
Eundem  eligit  A.  B.  Last  of  all  he  pronounces 
the  Election  according  to  the  paper  he  has  writ- 
ten. 

If  there  have  been  an  opposition,  the  Scru- 
tators count  the  votes,  and  give  the  lesser  number 
to  the  Senior  Proctor,  who  (with  the  Junior 
Proctor  standing  by  him)  publishes  them  at  his 
place. 

He  then  reads  the  votes  for  the  Person  chosen, 
and  from  his  paper  previously  prepared,  Ego  A.  B. 
Senior  Procurator,  $c. 

The  Person  elected  goes  to  the  table,  and 
subscribes  the  following  form  in  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor's book : 


246 

We  whose  names  are  thereunder  written  do 
declare  that  we  will  conform  to  the  Liturgy  of 
the  Church  of  England,  as  it  is  now  by  Law 
established. 

He  then  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and 
Supremacy,  and  the  Oath  of  Office  is  administered 
to  him  by  the  Vice-Chancellor. 

Jurabis  quod  omnes  et  singulas  ordinationes 
Qfficium  tuum  concernentes,  pro  parte  tua9  juxta 
vim,formam,  et  effectum  earundem,  bene  et  Jide- 
liter  observabis  et  adimplebis. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet  et  Sancta  ejus  Evangelia. 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  530. 

If  the  notice,  &c.  be  at  a  Convocation,  the 
forms  of  the  notice,  nomination,  and  voting,  are 
in  English. 


The  reading  of  the  Certificate  of  resignation, 
the  forms  of  notice,  nomination,  pricking,  and  of 
the  Election  of  the  Librarian,  are  the  same  as 
for  the  Principal  Librarian. 

The  form  of  the  vote  is,  A.  B.  eligit  C.  D. 
in  Bibliothecarium  hujus  Academics. 

The  usual  Oaths  are  taken.  For  the  Oath 
of  Office,  see  p.  246. 

The  subscription  of  conformity  is  made,  as 
above. 

If  there  be  an  opposition,  the  proceedings  are 
as  in  p.  245. 


247 


If  the  notice,  &c.  be  at  a  Convocation,  the 
forms  are  in  English. 


The  Vice-Chancellor  appoints  a  Congregation, 
or  a  Convocation,  in  which  the  Senior  Proctor 
reads  the  Certificate  of  resignation,  if  there  be 
one. 

He  gives  notice,  in  the  usual  form,  see  p.  243. 
of  the  Vacancy,  and  the  time,  pro  Electione  Re* 
gistrarii  hujus  Academic. 

For  the  form  of  nomination  and  pricking,  see 
p.  243. 

For  the  proceedings  at  the  Election,  see 
p.  244. 

The  usual  Oaths  are  taken.  For  the  Oath 
of  Office,  see  p.  246. 

The  subscription  is  made,  see  p.  246. 

If  there  be  an  opposition  the  proceedings  are 
as  mentioned,  p.  245. 

If  the  notice  be  at  a  Convocation,  the  forms 
are  in  English. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  delivers  the  keys  of  the 
office  to  the  new  Registrary. 

£Intittr0it|>  printer. 

At  a  Congregation  or  a  Convocation,  the 
Senior  Proctor  reads  the  Certificate  of  resignation, 
if  there  be  one. 


248 

He  gives  notice  of  the  Vacancy,  and  day  of 
Election,  thus: 

Dominus    Pro-Cancellarius    assignat  horam 

,        diei pro    Elections   Stationarii,  sen 

librorum  Impressoris ;   or, 

Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius    assignat    horam 

.      diei  •          pro   Electione    Stationarii,   sive 

librorum     Impressoris9    in    decennium    proxime 

Jiiturum,   sub  Us  conditionibus9   qua  continentur 

in  certis  quibusdam  indenturis,  inter  Academiam 

et  ipsum  factis  vel  faciendis. 

For  the  form  of  nomination  and  pricking,  see 
p.  243. 

For    the    proceedings    at    the    Election,    see 
p.  244. 

No  Oaths  are  taken,  or  subscription  made. 

If  there  be  an  opposition,  the  proceedings  are 
as  mentioned,  p.  245. 

If  the  notice  be  at  a  Convocation,  the  forms 
are  in  English. 

The  Person   elected,   and  another  with  him, 
give  a  bond  to  the  University. 

He  has  letters  patent  from  the  University,  by 
a  Grace  passed  in  two  Congregations. 


249 


Finttwr* 

Formerly  four  Vintners  only  were  licenced 
by  the  University,  who  paid  thirty  pounds  per 
annum  each.  The  Heads  nominated  two  Persons, 
one  of  whom  was  elected  by  the  Senate. 

Now  the  number  is  unlimited,  and  licences 
are  granted  on  application  to  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor. 

The  larger  Vintners  pay  ten  pounds,  the 
smaller  five  pounds,  each,  annually  to  the  Uni- 
versity. 


The  Senior  Proctor  gives  notice,  at  a  Con- 
gregation, or  Convocation,  of  the  time  of  Elec- 
tion: 

Dominus    Pro-Cancellarius    assignat    Jioram 

™    ..        (Gageaforie     ^ 

diei  — —  pro  Electione  \    *        ..  .    .   [ 

(  Appretiatons  J 

Jiujus  Academic. 

For  the  form  of  nomination  and  pricking,  see 
p.  243. 

For  the  proceeding  at  the  Election,  see  p.  244. 

The  Gager  and  Appraiser  should  take  an 
Oath  to  perform  the  duties  of  their  Offices 
faithfully. 


250 

If  there  be  an  opposition,  the  proceedings  are 
as  mentioned  p.  245. 

They  have  letters  patent  granted  them  by 
Graces  passed  in  two  Congregations: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  A.  B.  nuper  in  Academics 
^Gageatorem  j  ^  ^^  ^.  Muneris 

I  Appretiatorem  ) 
patentee,  habeat  Sigitto  vestro  Communi  sigillatas. 

If  the  Election  be  at  a  Convocation,  the  forms 
are  in  English. 

ScJaoHvtrpcr,  urtjo  te  aI0o  tfjc  ifcltaringir3* 

At  a  Congregation,  or  a  Convocation,  the 
Senior  Proctor  gives  notice  of  the  Vacancy,  and 
the  time  of  Election,  in  the  usual  form :  . 

assignat  horam  — diei »  pro  Elections 

campanarum  Pulsatoris,  et  Scholarum  Curatoris 
Jiujus  Academic?. 

For  the  form  of  nominating  and  pricking,  see 
p.  243. 

For  the  proceedings  at  the  Election,  see  p.  244. 
He  takes  no  Oaths. 

If  there  be  an  opposition,  the  proceedings  are 
as  mentioned,  p.  245. 

If  the  Election  be  at  a  Convocation,  the  forms 
are  in  English. 

3  The  two  Library  Keepers,  and  the  Keeper  of  the  Fitz- 
-william  Museum  are  nominated  and  elected  as  above. 


251 


fctmbcmtg  &outt0*l. 

There  are  usually  two  of  them.  They  are 
appointed  by  Grace :  see  Mr.  Graham's  appoint- 
ment, 1787.  Lib.  Grot.  Lambda,  p.  197- 

They  have  letters  patent  from  the  University. 

See  Mr.  Yorke's  appointment,  1757.  Regis- 
trary's  Book  of  Forms. 

The  Grace  is  usually  in  the  following  form : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Magister  A.  Coll. sit 

e  Consiliis    in   Causis  Juridicis,    utque    solitum 
stipendium  e  Cista  Communi  eidem  exsolvatur. 

They  have  been  usually  two  in  number,  but 
the  Graces  for  their  appointment  having  been 
repeatedly  rejected,  either  by  the  Caput  or  the 
Senate,  in  1826  three  were  elected. 


<£ltt  ttou  of  tflertt*  to  lifting*  in  tfjc  $)rt0tntation 
of  tljc 


At  a  Congregation,  or  a  Convocation,  the 
Senior  Proctor  gives  notice  of  the  Vacancy,  and 
the  time  of  Election,  thus  : 

Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius,  certior  factus  Rec- 
toriam  de  -  in  Comitatu  -  [vel  in 
Diocesi]  jam  vacare  4  assignat  horam  -  -- 


pro  Electione  novi  Rectoris. 


*  Sometimes  Jam  vacare,  atque  jus  prcesentandi  ad  Acade- 
mlam  pertinere,  assignat,  fyc. 


252 

At  the  time  of  Election,  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
the  two  Proctors,  and  the  Junior  Doctor  in 
Divinity  present,  stand  in  Scrutiny.  If  there 
he  no  Doctor  in  Divinity,  the  Junior  Doctor  in 
Law,  or  (if  there  be  no  Doctor  in  Law,  the  Junior 
Doctor  in  Physic,  is  to  he  one  of  the  Scrutators. 

The  Scrutators  first  give  their  written  votes : 
A.B.  digit  C.D.  in  Rector  em  Ecclesice  de , 

A  Bedell  calls,  Ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
Rectoris  de . 

The  Noblemen,  Doctors,  Non-Regent  and 
Regent  Masters,  deliver  their  votes  to  the  Scru- 
tators, written  in  the  above  form  ;  a  Bedell  calling 
at  proper  intervals,  ad  Scrutinium  Secundo,  and 
ad  Scrutinium  ultimo. 

When  all  the  votes  are  given  up,  the  Bedell 
calls,  Cessatum  est  a  Scrutinio. 

The  Proctors  go  to  their  place,  and  the  Senior 
Proctor  reads  one  of  the  votes  at  length.  For 
each  of  the  others  he  says,  Eundem  eligit  A.  B. 
Lastly  he  votes  and  declares  the  Election  thus : 

Ego  A.  B.  Senior  Procurator  hujus  Academic, 
(eligo,  et)  electum  a  Vobis  pronuncio  C.  D.  in 
Rectorem  de . 

If  there  have  been  an  opposition,  the  Scrutators 
number  the  votes  for  each  Candidate. 

The  Senior  Proctor,  in  his  place,  reads  the 
votes  for  each,  separately,  beginning  with  the 
smallest,  and  ending  with  the  largest  number, 


253 

and  lastly  he  pronounces  as  above;  inserting  or 
leaving  out  the  words,  Eligo  et,  as  the  case  has 
been. 

If  the  Election  be  at  a  Convocation,  the  forms 
are  in  English. 

The  following  Grace  is  passed,  in  two  Con- 
gregations, for  affixing  the  University  Common 
Seal  to  the  presentation  : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  A.  B.  jam  electus  in  Rec- 
toriam  de  •  Prcesentationem  ad  dictam 

Rectoriam  habeat,  Sigillo  vestro  Communi  sigilla* 
tarn. 

The  Presentation  is  prepared  by  the  Regis- 
trary. 


The  University  is  to  nominate,  under  their 
Common  Seal,  within  four  months  after  the 
Vacancy,  two  Persons  of  the  University,  to  the 
heir  of  Sir  Edward  North,  (Chancellor  of  the 
Court  of  Augmentations,  in  the  Reign  of  King 
Henry  the  Eighth)  who  is  to  present  one  of 
the  two  to  the  Bishop  of  Norwich. 

If  the  University  do  not  nominate  within  four 
months,  the  Heir  may  present  any  one  whom  he 
may  think  proper,  to  the  Bishop. 

If  the  Heir  do  not  present  one  of  the  Persons 
nominated,  within  fourteen  days  after  the  nomi- 


254 


nation 5,  the  University  may  present  one  of  the 
two,  whom  they  think  meet. 

If  the  Person  presented  by  him,  or  them, 
refuse  to  accept,  the  University  shall  nominate 
two  others.  If  of  these,  the  Person  presented 
by  him,  or  them,  shall  refuse  to  accept,  or  if 
the  University  do  not  nominate  two  Persons 
within  four  months  after  a  Vacancy,  the  heir  may 
present  any  one,  whom  he  shall  think  proper. 

When  the  Vicarage  of  Burwell  was  vacant, 
the  Senior  Proctor  published  the  following  notice : 

Feb.  19,  1772!.  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius, 
certiorfactus  Ficariam  Sanctce  Marice  de  Burwell, 
in  Comitatu  Cantabrigiensi,  jam  vacare,  assignat 

Jioram  secundam  pomeridianam  diet proxime 

sequentis  pro  Electione  duorum  Clericorum  idoneo- 
rum  et  kabilium,  hujus  Academics  studentium, 
quorum  alterum,  Honoratissimus  Dominus,  Domi- 
nus Franciscus  Comes  de  Guildford,  prcesentare 
tenetur  ad  dictam  Vicariam,  virtute  indenture 
cujusdam  inter  Dominum  Edvardum  North  Mili- 
tem,  et  Cancellarium,  Magistros  et  Scholares 
hujus  Academics  factce.  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa,  p.  519. 

On  the  22d  Feb.  the  Election  took  place  as 
directed  p.  252.  When  it  was  finished,  the  Senior 
Proctor  declared  it  in  the  following  form  : 

Nominati  et  Electi  in  Vicariam  de  Burwett, 

Hen.  Turner. 
Thos.  Ferris. 

5  Taking  only  six  shillings  and  eight  pence,  for  the  writing 
and  sealing  of  the  Presentation.     See  the  Grant. 


255 

On  the  25th  of  February  the  following  Grace 
for  affixing  the  Common  Seal  to  the  Presentation 
was  passed: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Henricus  Turner,  S.T.B. 
et  Thomas  Ferris,  A.M.  jam  a  Vobls  electi, 
prcesententur  Honoratissimo  Domino,  Domino 
Francisco  Comiti  de  Guildford,  ut  eorum  alter 
promoveatur  per  eundem,  ad  Ftcariam  Sanctce 
Marice  de  Burwell,  in  Comitatu  Cantdbrigiensi ; 
et  ut  ejus  rei  literas  vestras  habeat  testimoniales, 
Commtmi  vestro  Sigillo  sigillatas.  Lib.  Grat. 
Kappa,  p.  519. 


of 

The  University  in  June  11,  1707,  by  the 
following  Special  Grace  appointed  Mr.  George 
Rolfe,  Professor  of  Anatomy : 

Cum  Georgius  Rolfe  v arias  Anatomias  in  hac 
Academid  perfecerit  summa  cum  laude  in  usum 
studiosce  juventutis  optimum; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Professoris  Anatomici  titu- 
lum  propter  singularem  ejus  in  istd  Facultate 
peritiam  honoris  ergo  consequatur.  Senatus-con- 
sult.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  408. 

By  the  following  Grace,  passed  in  a  Convo- 
cation April  17,  1728,  the  University  established 
a  Professorship  of  Anatomy : 

"  Whereas  Mr.  George  Rolfe,  who  by  favour 
"  of  this  Senate  obtained  the  Professorship  of 


256 

"  Anatomy  in  this  University,  has  been  several 
"  years  absent  from  his  Office,  and,  though  sent 
"for  ty  Mr.  Vice-Chancellor's  order,  has  taken 
"  no  notice,  and  continues  still  in  neglect; 

66  May  it  please  you  that  his  Professorship 
"  be  declared  vacant,  and  that  another  by  you  be 
"  chosen  to  succeed  him  in  Office  and  Title" 

The  following  proceedings,  relating  to  Elec- 
tions of  Professors  of  Anatomy,  are  taken  from 
records  in  the  Office  of  the  Registrary : 

April  22,  1728. — John  Morgan,  A.M.  Fellow 
of  Trin.  Coll.  was  chosen  Professor  of  Anatomy. 

Publicat.  19  Jan.  1733. — Dominus  Pro-Can- 
cellarius  certior  factus  Munus  Professoris  Ana- 
tomice  jam  vacare  per  mortem  Magistri  Joannis 
Morgan,  assignat  horam  secundam  postmeridianam 
diei  Martis  proxime  sequentis  pro  Electione  Pro- 
fessoris Anatomic. 

22  Jan.  HZS.—Georgius  Cuthbert,  A.M. 
electus  est  Professor  Anatomies. 

Publicat.  Mart.  17,  1734  —  Dominus  Pro- 
Cancellarius  statuit  horam  decimam  antemeridia- 
nam  diei  crastini  pro  Electione  Professoris  Ana- 
tomice. 

Electus  est  Magister  Banks. 

Dec.  5,  1746.  —  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius 
assignat  horam  secundam  postmeridianam  diei 
Jovis  proxime  sequentis  pro  Electione  Lectoris 
Anatomice. 


257 

11  Dec.  n^.—Electus  est  Dr.  GuL  Gibson. 

12  Mar.  1753.     Publ.  in  plen.  Cong.  — -Domi- 
nus    Pro-Cancellarius    certior  factus  de    morte 
Doctoris   Gibson,    Lectoris  Anatomite,    assignal 
horam  primam  pomeridianam  diei  L,un<e  proxime 
sequentis  pro  Electione  Lectoris  Anatomies. 

17  Mar.  Itf53.—Electu$  est  Carolus  Collig- 
non,  M.B. 

Oct.  5,  1785.  —  May  it  please  you  that  this 
Convocation  be  turned  into  a  Congregation  in 
order  to  appoint  a  Lecturer  in  Anatomy: 

5  Oct.  1785.  —  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius 
certior  factus  de  morte  Doctoris  Cottignon,  Pra- 
lectoris  Anatomic?,  assignat  horam  secundam 
pomeridianam  diei  Jovis  in  hebdomadd  proxime 
sequenti  pro  Electione  Prcelectoris  Anatomice. 

10  Oct.  1785. — Placeat  Vobis,  utin  Electione 
Prcelectoris  Anatomies  die  Jovis  proxime  sequenti 
in  Senaculo  habenda,  suffragia  dentur  secundum 
morem  in  Electione  Burgensium  receptum6. 

6  Why  on  this  occasion  the  Senate  thought  proper  to  pass 
a  Grace  AUTHORIZING  the  mode  of  Election  which  had  been 
uniformly  observed  from  the  establishment  of  the  Professorship, 
I  have  taken  much  pains  to  ascertain.  My  endeavours  to 
get  any  account  of  this  transaction,  or  of  the  motives  that 
led  to  it,  have  completely  failed.  If  I  might  hazard  a  con- 
jecture, I  should  say  that  the  Persons  who  brought  in  the 
Grace  were  not  aware  (thirty-two  years  having  elapsed  since 
the  last  Vacancy)  that  the  mode  of  Election  to  this  Professor- 
ship had  always  been  more  Burgensium;  and  that  they 
therefore  followed  the  precedent  established  in  1773,  with 
respect  to  the  Chemical  Professorship. 

R 


258 

13  Oct.  1785. — Electus  est  in  Prcelectorem 
Anatomies  Busick  Harwood  in  Medicind  Bacca- 
laureus. 

18  Nov.  1814.  Publ.  in  plen.  Cong. — Dominus 
Pro-Cancellarius,  certior  factus  de  morte  Ana- 
tomies Prqfessoris,  assignat  Jioram  primam  diei 
Mercurii  proxime  sequentis  pro  Electione  novi 
Anatomies  Professor  is  hujus  Academics* 

23  Nov.  1814.  Lect.  A.M.  Concess.  P.M.— 
Placeat  Vobis,  ut  in  Electione  Preslectoris  Ana- 
tomice  hodie  in  Senaculo  habenda,  suffragia  dentur 
secundum  morem  in  Electione  Burgensium  re- 
ceptum. 

Electus  est  Joannes  Hamland,  A.M. 


28  Maii  1817.     Publ.  in  plen.  Cong.—. 

Pro-Cancellarius  certior  factus  de  cessione 
Prqfessoris  Anatomies,  assignat  horam  primam 
postmeridianam  diei  decimi  Junii  proxime  se- 
quentis  pro  Electione  Prqfessoris  Anatomies  hujus 
Academics. 

10  Jun.  1817.  Lect.  A.M.  Concess.  P.M.— 
Placeat  Vobis,  ut  in  Electione  Prcelectoris  Ana- 
tomies instanti,  suffragia  dentur  secundum  morem 
in  Electione  Burgensium  receptum. 

Electus  est  Gulielmus  Clark,  A.M. 

The  form  of  proceeding  is  the  same  as  that 
observed  in  the  Election  of  a  Clerk  to  a  Living, 
see  p.  251. 


259 

The  Person  elected  subscribes  the  Declaration 
of  Conformity  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  book.  See 
the  form,  p.  238. 

He  then  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and 
Supremacy,  and  the  Vice-Chancellor  administers 
to  him  the  Oath  of  Office. 


of 

The  University,  on  November  10th,  1724, 
by  the  following  Special  Grace,  appointed  Mr. 
Richard  Bradley  Professor  of  Botany : 

Cum  Ricardus  Bradley,  Societatis  Londinensis 
SociuSy  in  re  Herbaria  se  peritissimum  exhibuerit, 
atque  horto  Botanico  instruendo  et  exornando  et 
sumptus  et  operam  impendere  sposponderit,  in 
summum  hujus  Academics  commodum  decusque; 
Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Professoris  Botanici  titulum 
honoris  ergo  apud  vos  consequatur.  Senatus- 
consult.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  415. 

By  the  following  Grace,  passed  January  23, 
1732,  the  University  established  a  Professorship 
of  Botany: 

Cum  per  mortem  Ricardi  Bradley  nuperi 
Professoris  Botanici  Munus  istud  jam  vacans 
existit;  Placeat  Vobis,  ut  alius  ad  idem  Munus 
exequendum  a  vobis  eligatur. 

The  following  proceedings,  relating  to  Elec- 
tions of  Professors  of  Botany,  are  taken  from  the 

R2 


260 

records   in   the  Office  of  the   Registrary  of 'the 
University : 

Puhlicat.  7  die  Feb.  1732.  —  Dominus  Pro- 
Cancellarius  assignat  Jioram  tertiam  postmeridi- 
anam  diei  crastini  pro  Electione  Professoris 
Botanici. 

8  Feb.  1732.  —  Electus  est  Johannes  Marty m, 
Coll.  Emman.  Botanicus  Professor  hujus  Aca- 
demics. 

Lect.  per  Procm.  Senm.  in  plen.  Cong.  Jan.  30, 
1762.  —  In  the  name  of  God,  Amen:  I9  John 
Martyn,  Professor  of  Botany  in  the  University 
of  Cambridge9  for  certain  good  causes  and  con- 
sideralions  me  thereunto  moving,  do  hereby  wil- 
lingly and  absolutely  resign  into  the  hands  of 
the  Right  Worshipful  Robert  Plumptre,  JD.D., 
Vice-Chancellor  of  the  said  University,  the  said 
Office  of  Professor  of  Botany  in  the  University 
of  Cambridge;  humbly  desiring  the  said  Vice- 
Chancellor  to  declare  the  said  Office  of  Professor 
of  Botany  to  be  void  of  my  person  to  all  intents 
and  purposes  whatsoever.  In  witness  whereof  I 
have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and  seal  the  Wtk 
day  of  November,  in  the  year  of  our  Lord 
1761. 

JOHN  MARTYN,  (L.  S.) 

Signed,  Sealed,  $r. 
in  the  presence  bf 

J.  V.  WYNNE, 
H.  GOLDSMITH. 


261 

Publ.  in  pleiu  Cong,  per  Procm.  Senm.  30  Jan. 

1762.  —  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius   assignat  se- 

cundum  diem  Februarii  proxime  sequentis  post 

finitam  concionem  pro  Elections  Professoris   ~Bo- 

tanici. 

2  Feb.  1762. — Electus  est  Thomas  Martyn, 
AM.  Coll.  Sid.  Soc. 

The  Mode  of  electing  the  Professor  of  Botany 
is  that  observed  in  the  Election  of  a  Clerk  to 
a  Living.  See  p.  251. 

The  Person  elected  subscribes  the  Declaration 
of  Conformity  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book. 
See  p.  238. 

He  then  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and 
Supremacy,  and  the  Vice-Chancellor  administers 
to  him  the  Oath  of  Office. 

In  the  year  1825,  the  Professorship  of  Botany 
became  vacant  by  the  death  of  Rev.  Thomas 
Martyn.  The  Rev.  John  Stevens  Henslow, 
M.A.,  of  St.  John's  College,  was  a  Candidate 
for  the  Office,  and  would  undoubtedly  have  been 
the  Person  on  whom  the  choice  of  the  Senate 
would  have  fallen,  had  it  proceeded  to  an  Election 
more  Burgensium,  according  to  the  invariable 
practice ;  but  no  Election  in  fact  took  place,  as 
the  Crown  thought  proper  to  appoint  Mr.  Henslow 
to  the  Office  by  Letters  Patent,  as  appears  by 
the  following  Record  taken  from  the  Registrary's 
Office: 


262 

"  Be  it  remembered,  that  on  Monday  the 
tenth  day  of  October,  in  the  year  of  our  Lord 
one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty-five,  the 
Rev.  John  Stevens  Henslow,  M.A.,  of  St.  John's 
College,  appeared  before  the  Right  Worshipful 
Thomas  Le  Blanc,  Doctor  of  Civil  Law,  Vice- 
Chancellor  of  the  University  of  Cambridge,  in 
the  Senate-House,  and  then  and  there  exhibited 
his  Majesty's  Letters  Patent,  under  the  Great 
Seal  of  Great  Britain,  bearing  date  the  —  day 

of in  the  —  year  of  the  reign  of  our  Sovereign 

Lord  King  George  the  Fourth,  thereby  granting 
to  the  said  John  Stevens  Henslow  to  become 
Reader  in  Botany  in  the  said  University,  which 
said  Letters  Patent  being  openly  read,  the  said 
Vice-Chancellor  administered  to  the  said  John 
Stephens  Henslow  an  Oath,  whereby  he  swore 
duly  to  discharge  the  duties  of  the  said  Reader- 
ship ;  and  thereupon  the  said  Vice-Chancellor 
declared  the  said  John  Stephen  Henslow  ad- 
mitted to  the  said  Readership,  according  to  the 
tenor  of  the  said  Letters  Patent. 

"  Me  present, 

"  T.  SHELFOED,  Dep.  Reg:9 


of 


The  University,  on  December  15,  1808,  ap- 
pointed the  Rev.  Dr.  Clarke,  Professor  of  Mine- 
ralogy by  the  following  Special  Grace  : 


263 

Cum  Vir  Reverendus,  Edvardus  Daniel 
Clarke,  LL.D.  sit  in  studio  Mineralogies  ap- 
prime  versatus,  et  eidem  studio  apud  vos  promo- 
vendo  curam  magnopere  impendent,  turn  Lee- 
tionibus  publicis,  quas  jam  biennio  perlegit,  in- 
stitutis,  turn  Speciminibus,  undequaque  collectist 
exhibitis ; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  idem   E.  D.  Clarke  Pro- 
fessoris    Mineralogies     titulo    suffragiis     vestris 
cohonestetur. 

By  the  following  Grace7,  passed  May  15, 
1822,  the  University  established  a  Professorship 
of  Mineralogy : 

15  Mai.  1822. 

Cum  per  mortem  Edvardi  Danielis  Clarke, 
nuperi    Professoris   Mineralogici,    Munus  istud 
jam  vacans  existit; 

Placeat  J^obis,  ut  alius  ad  idem  Munus  exe- 
quendum  a  Vobis  eligatur. 

A  day  of  Election  was  fixed  in  the  usual 
form  ;  previously  to  which  the  Heads  nominated 8 

7  Copied  from  the  Grace  establishing  the  Professorship  of 
Botany. 

8  This  claim  of  nomination  —  never  before  asserted  in  the 
case  of  Professorships  —  was  strenuously  resisted  by  the  Se- 
nate.    Before  the  nomination   took   place,   a  respectful  Me- 
morial against  it,  signed  by  seventy-four  resident  Members 
of  the  Senate,  was  presented  to  the  Vice- Chancellor.     The 
Heads   persisted   in   their   claim.     On   the  day   of  Election, 
a   very   great   majority   of  votes   were   tendered  for  a  third 
Candidate,  by  Electors   who  were  friendly  to  Mr.  Henslow. 

These 


264 

Mr.  Henslow  of  St.  John's,    and   Mr.   Lunn   of 
the  same  College. 

From  a  Record  in  the  Registrary's  Office, 
it  appears  that  Mr.  Henslow  was  elected,  and 
afterwards  sworn  and  admitted  by  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor. 


These  votes  were  rejected  by  the  Vice-Chancellor;  and  the 
Senate  were  compelled,  either  to  admit  the  claim  of  the 
Heads  to  nomination,  or  to  defend  their  Privileges  in  a  Court 
of  Justice.  They  applied  to  the  Court  of  King's  Bench :  the 
Heads  contended  that  that  Court  had  no  jurisdiction,  but  that 
the  application  should  have  been  made  to  the  King  in  Council. 
This  objection  was  overruled  by  the  Court,  and  the  litigation 
continued  more  than  two  years,  during  which  the  case  was 
most  ably  argued  by  the  Counsel  on  both  sides.  It  was  at 
length,  in  the  year  1825,  agreed  to  refer  the  whole  matter 
in  dispute  to  Sir  John  Richardson ;  and  by  a  Grace  of  the 
Senate  Sir  John  was  requested  to  undertake  the  arbitration, 
to  which  he  consented.  I  understand  the  papers  have  not  yet 
(April  23,  1827.)  been  laid  before  him.  To  whom  this  delay 
is  attributable,  I  do  not  know ;  but  this  much  is  certain,  that 
the  statement  on  the  part  of  the  Members  of  the  Senate  was 
sent  to  the  Counsel  employed  on  the  part  of  the  Heads,  and 
it  was  not  till  eleven  months  had  elapsed  that  they  were 
returned  by  him. 

The  whole  of  the  proceedings  in  this  very  curious  and 
important  Cause,  both  in  the  University  and  in  the  Court 
of  King's  Bench,  are  very  fully  reported  in  a  Pamphlet  pub* 
lished  in  the  year  1824. 


265 


of  Common 


FIRST    APPOINTMENT. 

1  Nov.  1788. 

Cum  Edvardus  Christian  Jurisconsultus,  Col- 
legii  Divi  Johannis  nuper  Socius,  publicas  lee- 
tiones  de  statu  et  legibus  Anglice  instituerit,  et 
per  tres  annos  perlegerit; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  idem  Edvardus  Christian, 
titulo  Professoris  Legum  Anglice,  donee  Col- 
legium  Doivningense  fundatum  fuerit,  vestris 
suffragiis  cohonestetur.  Lib.  Grat.  Lambda, 
p. 


of 

The  following  Special  Graces,  appointing  Pro- 
fessors of  Chemistry,  have  been  passed  at  different 
times. 

10  Feb.  1702.  Lect.  et  Concess. — Cum  Joannes 
Franciscus  Vigani,  Veronensis,  Artem  Chemicam 
multa  cum  laude  (non  sine  magno  studiosorum 
emolumento]  per  annos  viginti  hie  apud  nos  exer* 
cuerit; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  dictus  Joannes  Franciscus 
Vigani  titulo  Professoris  Chemice  in  Academia 
Cantabrigiensi  cohonestetur. 

9  This  Office  expired  at  the  death  of  Professor  Christian. 


266 

Placeat  etiam,  ut  super  hac  Concessione  vestra 
literas  habeat  vestras  testimoniales  Muneris  sui 
Professorii  Sigillo  vestro  Communi  sigillatas. 

11  Jan.  1713.  Lect.  et  Concess. — Cum  Reve- 
rendus  vir  Joannes  Waller,  S.T.B.  sit  Artis 
Chemicce  eximie  peritus,  quod  turn  Medicis,  turn 
aliis  quam  plurimis  Academicis  abunde  innotescit, 
ejusdemque  Artis  exercitium  ad  juvenum  studia 
promovendum  in  se  suscipere  non  dedignetur ; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  idem  Joannes  Waller  Pro- 
fessoris  Chemice  titulo  vestris  suffragiis  cohones- 
tetur. 

Aug.  3,  1718.  Read  and  Granted. —  Whereas 
by  the  death  of  Mr.  John  Waller,  the  Professor- 
ship of  Chemistry  in  this  University  (which  he 
obtained  by  favour  of  this  Senate}  is  become  void, 
and  Mr.  John  Mickleborough  (who  for  his  suf- 
ficient skill  in  that  Art  hath  been  recommended 
to  us  by  the  King's  Professor  of  Physic)  is  willing 
to  teach  the  same  to  young  Students ; 

May  it  please  You,  that  the  title  of  Chemical 
Professor  in  this  University  may  be  conferred 
on  him  the  said  Mr.  John  Mickleborough ,  and 
that  he  may  have  leave  to  take  possession  of  the 
house  and  all  other  things  belonging  to  the  same, 
by  the  favour  and  with  the  consent  of  the  Senate ; 
upon  condition  he  gives  in  an  inventory,  of  the 
goods  purchased  with  the  contribution  money,  to 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  security  that  due  care 
shall  be  taken  of  them  as  long  as  he  continues 
in  that  Office. 


267 

19  Mail,  1756.  Lect.  et  Concess. — Cum  Jo- 
annes Hadley  Inceptor  in  Artibus  sit  Artis 
Chemicce  eximie  peritus,  eoque  nomine  a  Regio 
in  Medicind  Professore  voibis  commendatus,  ejus- 
demque  Artis  exercitium  adjuvenum  studia  pro- 
movenda  in  se  suscipere  non  dedignetur ; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  idem  Joannes  Hadley  Pro- 
fessoris  Chemice  titulo  suffrages  vestris  cohones- 
tetur ;  domumque  habeat  Professoribus  Chemise 
ante  hac  assignatam,  ed  tamen  lege,  ut  inventarium 
vasorum,  instrumentorum9  reliquceque  supellectilis 
ejusdem  domus  infra  quindecim  dies  apud  Do- 
minum  Pro-Cancellarmm  deponere  teneatur. 

19  Nov.  1764.  Lect.  A.  M.  Concess.  P.  M.— 
Cum  Richardus  Watson,  A.  M.  sit  Artis  Chemice 
studiosus,  ejusdemque  exercitium  ad  juvenum  stu- 
dia promovenda  in  se  suscipere  desideret; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  idem  Richardus  Watson 
Professoris  Chemice  titulo  vestris  suffragiis  co- 
honestetur ;  domumque  habeat  Professoribus  Che- 
mice  antehac  assignatam,  ea  tamen  lege,  ut  cata- 
Iogum9  vasorum,  instrumentorum  reliquceque  su- 
pellectilis ejusdem  domus,  apud  Dominum  Pro- 
Cancellarium  deponere  teneatur. 

On  the  resignation  of  Mr.  Watson  in  1771? 
five  Candidates  offered  themselves.  The  incon- 
venience of  an  Election  by  Grace  became  then 
so  apparent,  that,  after  a  contest  of  two  years, 
without  any  prospect  of  a  Professor  being  ap- 
pointed, the  following  Grace  passed  the  Senate, 


268 

authorizing  them  to  fill  up  the  existing  Vacancy 
by  open  Poll. 

20  Nov.  1773.  Lect.  A.M.  Concess.  P.  M.— 
Cum  ii  omnes,  qui  Chemiam  in  Academid  excolere 
velint,  incommodum  hand  leve  sint  percepturi  ex 
diuturniore  Muneris  Professoris  Chemice  vaca- 
tione,  neque  a  Majoribus  nostris  Electioni  Pro- 
fessoris, cum  plures  exstiterint  Competitor es9  satis 
Commode  provisum  esse  videatur ; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Chemice  Professor  eligatur 
pro  hac  vice,  secundum  morem  in  Electione  Bur- 
gensium  receptum. 

11  Dec.  1773.  Publ.  in  plen.  Cong. — Dominus 
Pro-Cancettarius  assignat  horam  secundam  post- 
meridianam  diei  Mercurii  proxime  sequentis  pro 
Electione  Professoris  Chemice. 

15  Dec.  1773. — Electus  est  Isaacus  Penning- 
ton,  A.  M.  Coll.  Joh.  in  Professorem  Chemice. 

The  mode  of  Election  by  open  Poll  was  after- 
wards extended  to  all  future  Vacancies  by  the 
following  Grace : 

24  Oct.  1793.    Lect.  A.M.  Concess.  P.M.— 
Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Electiones  Professorum  Chemice 
fiant  in  posterum,  secundum  morem  in  Electione 
Burgensium  receptum. 

%5  Jan.  1794.  Publ.  in  plen.  Cong. — Domi~ 
nus  Pro-Cancellarius  assignat  horam  decimam 
diei  Mercurii  proxime  sequentis  pro  Electione 
Prcelectoris  in  Chemid, 


29  Jan.  —  Electus  est  Mr.  Parish,  Coll. 
Magd. 

3  Mail.  1813.  Publ.  in  plen.  Cong. — Dominus 
Pro-Cancellarius9  certior  factus  de  Professoris 
Chemice  resignatione,  assignat  horam  decimam 
diei  Mercurii  proximo  sequentis,  pro  Electione 
novi  Professoris  Chemice  hujus  Academics. 

5  Mali. — Electus  est  Smithson  Tennant,  M.J}. 
Coll.  Emman.  in  Professorem  Chemice. 

10  Mar.  1815.  Publ.  in  plen.  Cong. — Dominus 

Pro-Cancellarius,   certior  factus  de  morte  Pro* 

fessoris   Chemice9   assignat  horam   decimam   diei 

Mercurii  proxime  sequentis,  pro  Electione  novi 

Prcelectoris  Chemice  hujus  Academics. 

17  Mar. — Electus  est  Jacobus  Gumming,  A.M. 
Coll.  Trin.  in  Prcelectorem  Chemice. 

The  mode  of  Electing  the  Professor  of 
Chemistry  is  that  observed  in  the  Election  of 
a  Clerk  to  a  Living.  See  p.  251. 

The  Person  elected  subscribes  the  Declaration 
of  Conformity  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book. 
See  p.  238. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  the  Vice-Chancellor  administers  to 
him  the  Oath  of  Office. 


270 


of 

This  Election  is  by  Grace,  which  passes  in 
two  Congregations: 

1  Jul.  1755. 

Cum  Johannes  Randall,  omni  Musices  laude 

cumulatus,  plurima  scepe  suaviter,  eleganter,  con- 

cinne,  modulatus  fuerit,  cum  industrid,  quali  nemo 

fere  alms,  Puerorum  Choros  ad  Cantica  Sacra 

felicissime  exercuerit,  comitatemque  insuper,  per 

tredecim  fere  annos,  quos  apud  Academiam  com- 

moratus,  placendi  studiosus,  perpetuam  prcesti- 

terit; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  in  vestri  erga  diligentiam 
domesticam  studii  memoriam,  Professoris  in 
Scientia  Musica  titulo  ornetur.  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa, 
p.  253. 

April  9,  1799.  A  Grace  passed  the  Senate 
for  electing  the  Professor  (for  that  time)  by  open 
Poll. 

Electus  est  Carolus  Hague,  Mus.  B.  Aul. 
Trin. 

Mr.  J.  C.  Whitfield  was  elected  by  the  follow- 
ing Grace : 

Cum  Johannes  Clarke  Whitfield  permultos 
annos  et  modulandi  peritia  apud  vos  claruerit, 
et  in  Arte  Musica,  ob  eleganter  et  docte  inventa, 
egregium  sibi  locum  assecutus  sit: 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  titulo  Professoris  in  Scientia 
Musica  ornetur, 


271 


A  Grace  passes  in  two  Congregations,  in  the 
following  form : 

Apr.  — ,  18 — . 

Placeat  VoUs,  ut  A.  B.  Coll. sit  unus 

e  numero  duodecim  Pr&dicatorum,  db  Academia 
hoc  anno  emittendorum,  et  ut  super  hac  Concessione 
vestra  habeat  literas  testimoniales,  Sigillo  vestro 
Communi  sigillatas.  Lib.  Grat.  Lambda,  p.  179. 

The  Licence  is  prepared  by  the  Registrary. 

The   Preacher  subscribes  the  36th  Canon  in 
a  book  kept  by  the  Registrary. 


*  Moris'  STrateilina  jgtfjoiatr*. 

They  are  to  be  two  Bachelors  of  Arts,  who 
are  to  travel  into  Foreign  Countries,  soon  after 
they  have  taken  the  degree,  and  continue  abroad 
for  the  space  of  three  years. 

They  are  obliged  to  take  different  routes,  to 
be  determined  by  the  Trustees,  or  the  major  part 
of  them. 

They  are  to  be  chosen  out  of  two  different 
Colleges,  beginning  with  King's  and  Trinity, 
each  of  which  shall  nominate  two  Bachelors  of 
Arts,  and  the  Senate  shall  elect  one  from  each 
College. 


The  other  Colleges  shall  take  it  by  turns,  to 
nominate,  according  to  the  order  observed  in  the 
nomination  of  Proctors,  as  often  as  a  Vacancy 
shall  occur. 

They  shall  receive  one  hundred  pounds  per 
annum  during  three  years. 

The  Master  of  the  College  shall  present  to 
the  Vice-Chancellor  the  Persons  nominated  by 
his  Society,  and  shall  be  obliged  to  take  the 
following  Oath,  which  shall  be  read  to  him, 
at  a  Congregation,  by  the  Senior  Proctor  in  the 
Regent-House,  in  the  presence  of  the  Registrary : 

JDabis  fidem  Almce  Matri  Academic?,  quod 
tu  probe  noveris  Religionem,  Mores,  et  Doctrinam 
Juvenum,  quos  modo  prcesentasti,  et  eos  sane 
dignos  existimas,  quos  foras  emittat  Alma  Mater. 
Sic  te  Deus  adjuvet  et  Sancta  ejus  Evangelia. 

The  Senior  Proctor  gives  the  following  notice  : 

Dominus    Pro-Cancellarius    assignat    horam 
diei pro    Electione    Bacca- 


laurel  peregre  in  triennium  dimittendi. 

At  the  time  of  Election,  the  Senior  Proctor 
reads  the  following : 

Nominati  in  Baccalaureum  suffragiis  vestris 
eligendum,  ex  instituto  Domini  Worts,  peregre 
in  triennium  dimittendum,  sunt 

Ds.  A.  Coll. 
Ds.  B.  Coll, 


273 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  two  Proctors 
stand  in  Scrutiny. 

A  Bedell  calls,  Ad  Scrutinium  pro  Electione 
Baccalaurei  peregrinantis. 

The  Members  of  the  Senate  give  their  votes  in 
this  form : 

A.  B.  digit  Dominum  C.  D.  in  Baccalaureum 
peregre  in  triennium  dimittendum  ex  fundatione 
Magistri  Worts. 

When  all  the  votes  are  brought  to  the 
Scrutators,  the  Senior  Proctor  reads  them,  and 
declares  the  Election  in  the  usual  form. 

Each  Person  is  to  address,  in  the  course  of 
the  year,  two  letters  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
describing  the  Countries  he  has  seen.  The  Vice- 
Chancellor  will  then  give  him  the  following 
Certificate  "  to  the  Receiver  of  the  Fund  under 
the  Trust  for  Worts'  Travelling  Scholarship" 
which  will  entitle  him  to  his  salary. 

June — ,  18  — . 

This  is  to  certify,  that  I  have  received  two 
letters  from  Mr.  •  resident  at  •  , 

one  of  Mr.  Worts'  Travelling  Scholars ;  that  they 
have  been  laid  before  the  Senate,  and  will  be 
deposited  in  the  Public  Library. 

A.  B.  Vice-Chancellor. 


s 


Election  of  2ila&!>  fttargarrt'* 
in 


According  to  the  Grant  there  is  to  be  an 
Election  every  two  years. 

The  Reader  is  to  be  chosen  on  the  last  day 
of  the  Term  before  the  long  Vacation,  and  his 
two  years  are  to  commence  from  the  next  follow- 
ing Feast  of  the  Nativity  of  the  Virgin  Mary. 
(Sept.  8.) 

The  same  Person  may  be  elected  again  from 
time  to  time  :  but  the  practice  is  for  the  Reader 
to  continue  from  two  years  to  two  years,  without 
fresh  Elections;  and  the  Election  is  usually 
brought  on  soon  after  the  Lectureship  becomes 
vacant. 

The  Electors  are  the  Chancellor,  or  Vice- 
Chancellor,  and  the  Doctors,  Inceptors,  and 
Bachelors  of  Divinity  of  the  University,  who 
have  been  Regents  in  Arts  in  the  same. 
Grant. 

The  Grant  orders  that  if  the  Vacancy  happens 
in  Term  time,  the  Vice-Chancellor  shall,  without 
delay  (indilate)  cause  it,  and  the  time  of  electing 
another  Reader,  to  be  published  in  all  the  Schools 
of  the  University,  per  tres  dies  legibiles*  tune 
prox.  sequen. 

1  The  dies  legibiles  are,  Mondays,  Tuesdays,  Wednesdays, 
and  Thursdays,  if  not  Holidays.  Stat.  Eliz.  3.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  227. 


275 


If  it  be  Non-Term,  he  is  to  cause  it  to  be 
published  in  writing  under  his  Seal,  on  the 
School  doors,  and  the  doors  of  St.  Mary's 
Church. 

Vice-Chancellors  have  deferred  the  Election 
to  different  times  after  the  Vacancy,  according 

to  circumstances. 

. 

Dr.  Widdrington  died  in  Christ  College 
June  10,  1688 :  the  intimation  was  dated  the 
12th  of  the  same  month. 

Dr.  Gower  died  March  27, 1711 :  the  intima- 
tion was  dated  March  31,  1711. 

Dr.  Jenkins  died  April  7,  17 — :  the  intima- 
tion was  dated  April  10,  1727. 

Dr.  Brooke  died  in  Norfolk  the  7th  or  9th 
of  August:  the  intimation  was  dated  August  18, 
1788. 

The  intimation  is  to  continue  for  four  days, 
and  the  Election  is  to  be  on  the  fifth  day. 
Grant. 

At  the  time  of  Election,  the  Yeoman  Bedell, 
or  some  other  Person,  makes  Oath  that  the 
intimation  was  fixed  up  for  the  time  required. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  reads  to  the  Electors 
a  part  of  the  Foundation,  viz.  from  Cancellarius 
aut  Vice-Cancellarius  Universitatis  pradictce,  &c. 
to  in  eadem  Electione  prevalebit,  inclusive.  Suck's 
Book. 


276 

The  Vice-Chancellor  takes  the  Oath  prescribed 
in  the  Grant  : 

Jurdbls  quod  eliges  unam  aptam,  habilem, 
et  idoneam  Personam  in  Lectorem  Lectura  a 
Domina  Margareta  Richmondice  Comitissa  fun- 
data,  qualis  tibi  melius  et  utilius  videbitur  ex- 
pedire,  omni  Jhvore,  partialitate,  mercede,  timore, 
et  affectione  sinistra,  totaliter  posthabitis. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  ejus  Evangelia. 

Then  he  swears  the  Senior  Doctor  there 
present;  and,  after  him,  all  the  rest  of  the 
Electors  are  sworn  in  his  name  ;  viz.  Idem 
juramentum  quod  prczstitit  Dr.  •  in  sua 

persona,  <%c.     Buck's  Book. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  Senior  Doctor,  and 
Senior  Bachelor  in  Divinity,  stand  .in  Scrutiny. 
Grant. 

The  Electors  deliver  their  written  votes  to 
the  Scrutators2  in  the  order  of  their  Juniority, 
beginning  with  the  Junior  Bachelor  :  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  votes  last  of  all.  Suck's  Book. 

The  votes,  if  it  be  in  Term  time,  are  in 
the  following,  or  a  like  form  : 


(  V  T  T-*  "\ 

A.  B.  4  c  7^  /?  r  digit  C.  D.   in  Lectorem 

Sacra  Theologice,  ex  Fundatione  Illustrissimce 
Doming  Margareta,  Eichmondics  Comitissa,  in 
biennium. 


8  Secrete.    Grant. 


277 

If  it  be  Non-Term,  the  votes  may  be  in 
English. 

If  the  numbers  for  two  or  more  Candidates 
be  equal,  the  Vice-Chancellor  has  the  casting 
vote.  Grant. 

The  Scrutiny  being  ended,  all  the  votes  are 
numbered,  and  he  that  has  the  most  is  pronounced 
to  be  Reader  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  in  these, 
or  the  like  words,  if  in  Non-Term : 

/  do  declare  and  pronounce  D.  C.  the  Lady 
Margarefs  Reader,  for  two  years  next  to  come. 
Buck's  Book. 

In  Term-time,  at  the  back  of  his  chair : 

Ego  G.  W.  8.  T.P.  et  hujus  Academics  Pro- 
Cancellarius  \eligo  e't]  electum  a  vobis  pronuncio 
K.  W.  Lectorem  Domince  Margaretce  in  biennium. 
Buck's  Book. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  reads  the  whole  of  the 
Foundation  to  the  Reader.  Buck's  Book*. 

He  administers  the  Oath — quod  ipse  omnes 
et  singulas  Ordinationes  Illustrissimce  Domince 
Domince  Margaretce  Comitissce  Richmondice  Lee- 
turam  suam  concernentes,  pro  parte  sua,  juxta 


3  Volumus  quod  dictus  Cancellarius,  aut  Vice-Cancellarius, 
<5*c.  immediate  post  Electionem  cujuscunque  Lectoris  Lectures 
prazdictce,  in prcesentia'Doctorum,  Inceptorum,  et  Baccalaureorum 
prosdictorum  tune  ibidem  existen.  publice  declarabit,  sen  declarari 
faciet,  Fundationem  et  Ordinationes  nostras  in  praesentibus  content, 
et  specificat.  Grant. 


278 

mm9formam9  et  effectum  earundem  bene  etfideliter 
servabit  et  adimplebit.     Grant. 

He  is  then  admitted  by  the  Vice-Chancellor 
in  biennium. 

A  memorandum  of  Buck's  is,  that  no  strangers, 
either  Bachelors  or  Doctors,  are  permitted  to  give 
voices  in  this  Election. 


of 

The  Election  is  to  be  from  three  years  to 
three  years  (Grant) ;  but  the  same  person  may 
be  chosen  again. 

But  the  practice  is  for  the  Preacher  to  con- 
tinue from  three  years  to  three  years,  without 
fresh  Election. 

The  Electors  are  the  Chancellor,  or  Vice- 
Chancellor,  and  the  Masters  of  Colleges;  and 
the  Election  is  in  St.  Mary's  Church.  Grant. 

They  are  directed  to  chuse  unum  Prcedica- 
torem  Verbi  Dei  aptum,  habilem,  et  idoneum  ad 
prcedicandum,  videlicet  unum  Sacrce  Theologies 
Doctorem,  Socium  perpetuum  alicujus  Collegii 
dictce  Universitatis,  vel  alium  Doctorem  extra 
Collegium  in  eadem  commorantem9  si  quis  Doctor 
in  eadem  Universitate  aptus9  habilis9  et  ad  prce- 
dicandum  idoneus  reperiatur,  qui  dictum  Qfficium 
prcedicandi  acceptare9  et  ibidem  residere  voluerit. 
Et  si  in  Collegiis9  vel  extra  Collegia  infra  dictam 
Universitatem  non  reperiatur  talis  Doctor  ut 


279 


prcemittitur,  tune  volumus  quod  prcedictus  Can- 
cellarius,  sen  Vice-Cancellarius,  aut  eorum,  vel 
eorum  alterius  Deputatus,  et  Magistri,  Prcepositi, 
seu  Presidentes  Collegiorum,  ut  prcedicitur,  unum 
Sacrce  Theologice  Inceptorem,  Socium  alicujus 
Collegn^  vel  alibi  in  Universitate  prcedicta  stu- 
dentem,  aptum,  habilem,  et  ad  prcedicandum  ido- 
neum9  omni  favore,  partialitate,  mercede,  timore 
et  qffectione  totaliter  postpositis,  eligant,  seu  major 
pars  eorundem  Magistrorum  eligat.  Et  si  per 

ipsos  —  talis  Sacrce  Theologies  Inceptor non 

reperiatur,  tune  volumus  quod  idem  Cancellarius, 
$c.  unum  Sacrce  Theologice  Baccalaureum,  So- 
cium alicujus  Collegiiy  aut  alibi  in  Universitate 
commorantem,  aptum.,  8yc.  (in  quo  conscientiam 
dictorum  Cancellarii,  &e.  —  stride  in  Domino 
oneramus)  ad  Qfficium  Prcedicatoris  Verbi  Dei 
eligant.  Ibid. 

One  of  Christ's  College  is,  cceteris  paribus, 
to  be  preferred.  Ibid. 

The  Election  to  be  within  fourteen  days  after 
the  Vacancy.  Ibid. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  is  to  cause  the  Electors, 
who  are  then  present  in  the  University,  to  be 
called  together  to  St.  Mary's  Church,  for  the 
purpose  of  electing.  Ibid. 

The  intimation  is  to  be  fixed  on  the  West 
door  of  St.  Mary's  Church  4. 

4  For  three  days,  according  to  the  Yeoman  Bedell's  Oath 
at  Mr.  Hubbard's  Election:  and  for  the  same  time  at  Mr. 
Farmer's  and  Mr.  Kipling's  Elections. 


280 

At  the  time  of  the  Election  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor reads  a  part  of  the  foundation  5. 

If  there  he  an  equality  of  votes,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  has  a  casting  voice.  Grant. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  administers  the  following 
Oath  of  Office  before  the  Electors:  (Lib.  Stat. 
p.  534.) 

Jurdbis  quod  omnes  et  singulas  Ordlnaiiones 
IllustrissimcB  Domince  Domince  Margaretce  Comi- 
tissce  Richmondice,  Qfficium  Pr&dicatoris  Verbi 
Dei  in  Universitate  Cantabrigiensi  concernentes, 
pro  parte  tua,  juxta  vim,  formam,  et  effectum 
earundem,  bene  et  jideliter  observabis  et  adim- 
plebis,  nisi  aliter  tecum  dispensatumfuerit. 

Ita  te  Deus  adjuvet,  et  Sancta  ejus  Evangelia. 

Then  he  (the  Preacher)  readeth  the  whole 
Ordination  concerning  his  Preachership  :  (Buck's 


Quas  quidem  Ordinationes  idem  Prcedicator 
tune  et  ibidem,  de  verbo  ad  verbum,  tactis  per 
eum  Sacro-Sanctis  Evangeliis,  coram  dicto  Can- 
cellario  aut  Vice-Cancellario,  &p.  in  dicta  sua 
Admissione  leget.  Grant. 

There  is  the  following  form  of  Admission  in 
the  Registrary's  Office,  13  —  100: 

In  Dei  nomine,  Amen,  N'os  I.  E.  Academic 
Cantabr.  Pro-Cane,  admittimus  te  in  perpetuum 

5  See  this  mentioned  in  Mr.  Bennet's  account  of  Mr.  Gar- 
net's Election,  1774.     Registry  18  —  110. 


281 

Pradicatorem  Verbi  Dei,  in  pradicta  Univer- 
sitate,  ex  Fundatione  Illustrissimce  Domince 
Margarets,  Comitissce  Richmondia,  matris  Regis 
Henrici  Septimi;  In  nomine  Patris,  Filii,  et 
Spiritus  Sancti. 

The  same  form  of  Admission  is  in  the  black 
Parchment  Book ;  last  page  after  Dr.  Caryl's 
attestation  of  Mr.  Hubbard's  Election,  Dec.  29, 
1752. 

See  a  Letter  of  King  Charles  II.  Oct.  30, 
1679.  (Lib.  Stat.  p.  308.)  which  contains  a  dis- 
pensation as  to  preaching  the  Sermons  mentioned 
in  the  Grant. 

It  orders  that  the  Oath  which  the  Preachers 
were  to  take  be  altered  accordingly. 

The  words  nisi  tecum  aliter  dispensation  fuerit, 
which  are  not  in  the  letters  of  Foundation,  were 
probably  added  to  the  Oath  in  consequence  of  the 
King's  Letter. 


MARGARET  PREACHER. 

In   the    Vestry   of  Great   St.  Mary's  in  Cambridge, 
the  Q5th  day  of  January,    181Q: 

At  a  Meeting  to  elect  a  Lady  Margaret's  Preacher  in 
the  room  of  the  Rev.  JAMES  FAWCETT,  B.D.  late 
Fellow  of  St.  John's  College,  who  had  resigned  the 
said  Office.  Present, 

The  Hon.  and  Right  Worshipful  GEORGE  NEVILLE, 
M.A.  Vice-  Chancellor,  and  Master  of  Magdalene 
College; 

The  Rev.  Dr.  BARNES,  Master  of  St.  Peter's  College; 
The  Rev.  Dr.  CORY,  Master  of  Emmanuel  College; 
The  Rev.  Dr.  KAYE,  Master  of  Christ's  College; 
The  Rev.  Dr.  WOOD,  Master  of  St.  John's  College; 
The  Rev.  Dr.  WEBB,  Master  of  Clare  Hall; 
The  Rev.  Dr.  CHAFY,  Master  of  Sidney  College. 

Me  present, 

W.  HUSTLER,  Registrary. 

John  Fuller,  Clerk  of  St.  Mary's  parish,  made  oath 
that  the  intimation  was  affixed  to  the  West  door  of 
St.  Mary's  Church,  and  remained  during  three  days. 

Nominated  —  The  Rev.  THOMAS  CALVERT,  Fellow 
of  St.  John's  College. 

The  Rev.  THOMAS  CALVERT,  B.D.  Fellow  of  St. 
John  s  College,  was  elected,  and  sworn,  and  admitted 
same  day. 

This  I  attest, 

W.  HUSTLER,  Registrary. 
Reg.  F.  79. 

Mem.  At  this  meeting  it  was  determined  that  Mr. 
Hornbuckle,  who  was  a  Candidate,  was  not  eligible, 
as  he  was  in  possession  of  a  benefice. 


283 


of  tyc  mntf*  lUa&er  in  Dtlnmtp. 

The  Electors  are,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the 
Master  and  the  two  Senior  Fellows  (maxime 
Seniores)  of  Trinity  College,  the  Provost  of 
King's  College,  and  the  Masters  of  St.  John's 
and  Christ  Colleges. 

If  any  of  the  Electors  above-mentioned  be 
Vice-Chancellor,  the  Master  of  Queen's  College 
is  to  supply  his  place.  Stat.  de  Qfficio  trium 
Lectorum.  Registrars  Copy  of  Hare 9  Vol.  III. 
fol.  116. 

The  Electors  are  to  be  summoned  by  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  with  the  consent  of  the  Master  of 
Trinity  College,  to  meet  in  the  Public  Schools. 

They  are  to  cause  an  instrument  to  be  drawn 
by  the  Registrary,  the  day  after  they  have  known 
of  the  Vacancy,  in  which  they  are  to  fix  the  day 
of  examination  of  the  Candidates.  Ibid. 

There  are  to  be  two  copies  of  this  instrument ; 
one  of  which  is  to  be  fixed  to  the  door  of 
St.  Mary's  Church,  the  other  to  the  door  of  the 
Public  Schools.  They  are  to  remain  seven 
days 6. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  is  to  set  his  Seal  of 
Office  to  the  writings.  Buck's  Book. 

6  Seplem  dies  integros. 


884 

The  day  of  Examination  is  to  be  the  eighth 
day  after  the  Vacancy  is  known  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  and  the  Master  of  Trinity  College. 
Stat.  de  Qfficio. 

But  if  any  one  who  is  then  ahsent  from  the 
University  shall  seem,  in  the  judgment  of  the 
greatest  part  of  the  Electors,  though  he  he  not 
a  Candidate7,  most  worthy  of  the  vacant  Place, 
the  day  of  the  Examination  may  be  deferred,  till 
he  may  be  conveniently  sent  for,  respect  being  had 
to  the  distance  of  the  place.  And  if  he  be  out 
of  the  Kingdom  of  England,  another  Person 
may,  in  the  mean  time,  be  appointed  to  supply 
the  Place,  by  the  greater  part  of  the  Electors, 
and  receive  the  Stipend,  pro  ratd  portione.  Stat. 

The  Candidates,  who  are  to  be  Doctors  or 
Bachelors  of  Divinity,  are  first  to  be  examined 
per  Facultatem  Theologicdm,  concerning  their 
knowledge  in  the  Scriptures,  and  the  writings  of 
the  Holy  Fathers.  Ibid. 

Then  each  of  them,  on  days  appointed  by  the 
Electors,  are  to  interpret,  openly8,  some  part  of 
Scripture,  assigned  by  the  Electors,  for  the  space 
of  one  hour,  in  the  Public  Schools. 

On  the  day  after  the  reading,  the  Electors 
are  to  meet  in  the  Public  Schools. 

If  any  Elector  be  absent,  his  Substitute9  is 
to  supply  his  place.  Ibid. 

7  Etianm  non  petat.     Stat.  8  Palam.     Stat. 

9  Vicarius.     Stat. 


385 

The  Electors  are  chiefly l  to  regard  -  sound 
learning,  clearness  of  voice2,  pronunciation,  and 
elocution.  They  are  to  prefer  Fellows  of  Trinity 
College,  if  they  are  equal  to  other  Candidates. 
Stat. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  maketh  Oath  that  he 
duly  executed  the  intimation  of  the  Vacancy,  by 
affixing  the  same  to  the  School  gate,  and  the 
door  of  St.  Mary's  Church,  for  seven  days. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  has  with  him  the  black 
(Parchment)  Book.  Puck's  Book. 

He  reads  so  much  of  the  Foundation3  as 
concerneth  the  present  business,  and  then  taketh 
the  Oath  as  it  is  there  prescribed;  and  after 
him  all  the  Electors  do  the  same.  Suck's  Book. 

The  Oath  is  —  In  Locum  ilium  jam  vacantem, 
se  neminem,  vel  gratia,  vel  Munere,  vel  spe  all- 
cujus  muneris,  commotes,  sed  eum  quern,  Con- 
scientia  teste,  maxime  ad  illud  munus  idoneum 
judicaverint,  elecluros,  semota  omni  sinistra  animi 
qffectione,  prout  sunt  et  Jesu  servatori  rationem 
in  ultimo  die  reddituri,  et  Academics  honori,  et 
utilitati  Studentium  consulturi.  Stat. 


1  Potissimum.     Stat/  2  Claritatem  vocis.     Stat. 

3  Part  of  the  Act  of  Parliament  31  Eliz.  Cap.  6.  as  well 
as  a  part  of  the  Foundation  was  read  at  the  Election  of 
a  Divinity  Reader  in  1756;  of  a  Hebrew  Reader  1757,  and 
of  a  Greek  Reader,  1759- 


286 

They  go  to  Scrutiny,  which  is  always  open, 
and  in  English.  Buck's  Book. 

Suppose  that  there  are  three  competitors,  viz. 
Dr.  B. 
Dr.  C. 
Dr.  D. 

the  Vice-Chancellor  then  draweth  a  line  against 
every  one  of  their  names.  Then  the  Junior 
pricketh  first,  and  so  the  rest  in  their  Juniority; 
the  Vice-Chancellor  last  of  all.  Buck's  Book. 

The  Scrutiny  being  ended,  Mr.  Vice-Chan- 
cellor  pronounceth  him  elected  who  hath  the  most 
votes;  and  he  is  called  unto  the  House  by  a 
Bedell,  and  there  admonished  by  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  to  go  unto  the  Master  of  Trinity 
College  for  to  take  his  Oath.  Buck's  Book. 

If  the  Electors  do  not  agree  in  three  open 
Scrutinies,  he  is  to  be  elected,  whom  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  the  Master  of  Trinity  College 
only  shall  nominate.  If  the  Master  of  the 
said  College  be  Vice-Chancellor,  then  he  and 
the  Provost  of  King's  College  are  to  nominate. 
Stat. 

If  these  do  not  agree,  then  the  Chancellor 
of  the  University  alone,  if  he  be  a  Bishop,  shall 
nominate.  If  he  be  not  a  Bishop,  then  the 
Archbishop  of  Canterbury  alone  shall  nominate. 
Stat. 


287 

The  Person  elected  is  to  be  sworn  to  observe 
the  Statutes,  before  the  Master  and  the  eight 
Seniors  of  Trinity  College,  and  to  be  admitted 
by  the  Master.  Stat. 

He  is  to  subscribe  the  Declaration  of  Con- 
formity in  the  Vice  Chancellor's  Book. 


DIVINITY  SCHOOLS,  CAMBRIDGE, 
July  17,  1816. 

THE  BUSINESS  OF  ELECTING 
A    KING'S    READER    IN    DIVINITY. 

ELECTORS    PRESENT  : 

The  Right  Worshipful  JOHN  KAYE,   D.D.   Fice-Chanr. 
The  MASTER  of  Trinity  College. 

The  Rev.  GEO.  THACKERAY,  D.D.  Provost  of  King's. 
The  Rev.  JAMES  WOOD,  D.D.  Master  of  .St.  John's. 
The  Rev.  JAMES  LAMBERT,  Senior  Fellow  of  Trinity. 
M.  F.  AINSLIE,  Esq.  M.A.  Senior  Fellow  of  Trin.  Coll. 

J.  L.  HUBS  ER  STY,  M.D.  Senior  Fellow  of  Queen  s  Coll. 
as  Vicarius  of  the  President  of  Queen's. 

John  Laughton,  Yeoman  Bedell,  made  Oath  that 
he  had  duly  executed  the  intimation  by  fixing  the  same 
on  the  School  door,  and  on  the  West  door  of  St.  Mary's 
Church,  for  seven  days. 


288 

The  Right  Worshipful  JOHN  KAYE,  D.D.  Christ's  Coll. 
The  Rev.  HENRY  LLOYD,  D.D.  Trinity  College. 
The  Rev.  EDWARD  MALTBY,  D.D.  Pembroke  Hall. 
The  Rev.  RICHARD  RAMSDEN,  D.D.  Trinity  College. 
The  Rev.  GEORGE  D'€)YLY,   B.D.  Corpus. 

appeared   and    offered   themselves   as   Candidates  to   be 
examined. 

The  Candidates  were  called  one  by  one,  and  examined. 

The  30th  of  October  was  assigned  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  Dr.  Lloyd  to  read  their  Dissertations; 
the  Vice-Chancellor  at  ten  o'clock  in  the  meriting,  and 
Dr.  Lloyd  at  eleven  o'clock  the  same  morning. 

The  31st  was  assigned  to  Dr.  Maltby  and  Dr. 
Ramsden ;  the  former  to  read  at  ten  o'clock,  the  latter 
at  eleven. 

November  1st  was  assigned  to  Mr.  D'Oyly  to  read 
his  Dissertation  at  ten  in  the  morning. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  named  the  1st  Chapter  of  the 
Epistle  to  the  Romans  for  his  Subject. 

Dr.  Lloyd  named  the  1st  Chapter  of  the  1st  Epistle 
to  the  Corinthians. 

Dr.  Maltby  named  the  13th  Chapter  of  St.  Luke. 

Dr.  Ramsden  named  the  llth  Chapter  of  the  Epistle 
to  the  Hebrews,  verse  8th  to  the  19th,  both  inclusive. 

Mr.  D'Oyly  named  the  24th  Chapter  of  St.  Matthew. 

The  day  of  Election  was  fixed  for  November  the 
2d,  at  12  o'clock. 

The  Probationary  Lectures  were  read  by  the  Can- 
didates, according  to  appointment. 


289 


DIVINITY  SCHOOLS,  CAMBRIDGE, 
Novembers,  1816. 

THE  BUSINESS  OF  ELECTING 
A    KING'S    READER    IN    DIVINITY. 

ELECTORS    PRESENT  ! 

The  Right  Worshipful  JOHN  KAYE,  D.D. 
Vice-Chancellor. 

[Names  of  the  other  Electors.] 

Me  present,    W.  HUSTLER,  Registrar?/. 

The  Statute  of  the  31st  Elizabeth,  Cap.  6th  was  read, 
and  part  of  the  original  Foundation. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  first  took  the  Oath  therein 
prescribed,  and  afterwards  administered  to  all  the  Electors 
above-mentioned  the  same  Oath. 

Then  the  Rev.  JOHN  KAYE,  D.D.  was  elected  by 
a  majority  of  all  the  Electors. 

Signed,    JOHN  KAYE,  Vice- Chancellor, 

W.  BRISTOL,  Master  of  Trinity  College, 
and  the  other  Electors* 

Book,  No.  £.  of  Elections  of  Professors. 
F.  78.    Registry. 


290 


<$(r ftton  of  t!)f  liturr'f*  lit  iittrr  in 

The  Electors  are  the  same  as  for  the  King's 
Reader  in  Divinity. 

They  are  to  be  summoned  by  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, with  the  consent  of  the  Master  of  Trinity 
College,  to  meet  in  the  Public  Schools. 

The  Candidate  must  be  a  Master  of  Arts 
at  least,  or  a  Bachelor  of  Divinity.  But  Doctors 4 
of  all  Faculties  are  excluded  from  this  Lecture- 
ship. Stat. 

The  Candidates  are  to  be  examined,  as  to 
their  knowledge  of  the  Greek  language,  by  some 
Persons  skilled  therein;  and  on  certain  days, 
assigned  by  the  Electors,  are  to  interpret  a  part 
of  some  Author  written  in  this  language,  for  one 
hour  in  the  Public  Schools.  Stat. 

On  the  day  following  the  reading  of  these 
Probationary  Lectures,  the  Electors  are  to  meet 
in  the  Public  Schools. 

On  the  day  of  Election  precisely  the  same 
proceedings  take  place,  as  at  the  Election  of 
King's  Reader  in  Divinity. 


4  The  Greek  Reader,  by  taking  a  Doctor's  degree,  forfeits 
his  Lectureship. 


291 


LAW  SCHOOLS,  CAMBRIDGE, 
January  19,  1759- 

THE    BUSINESS    OF    ELECTING 
A  GREEK   LECTURER. 

ELECTORS    PRESENT  : 

The  Right  Worshipful  LYNFORD  CARYL,  D.D. 
Vice-Chancellor. 

[Other  NamesJ] 
Me  present,  H.  HUBBARD,  Registrar*/. 

Richard  Jennings,  Yeoman  Bedell,  made  Oath 
that  he  duly  executed  the  intimation,  by  affixing  the 
same,  for  seven  days,  on  the  School  gate,  and  at  the 
door  of  St.  Mary's  Church. 

MICHAEL  LORT,  M.A.  one  of  the  Fellows  of  Trinity 
College,  appeared,  and  offered  himself  as  a  Candidate, 
and  to  be  examined. 

Mr.  Vice-Chancellor,  and  all  the  Electors,  not 
thinking  it  nesessary  to  examine  him  in  public,  reserved 
to  themselves  the  right  of  examining  him  privately,  and 
appointed  Wednesday  the  seventh  day  of  February  next, 
at  three  of  the  clock,  in  the  afternoon,  for  Mr.  LORT  to 
read  his  Probation  Lecture,  upon  the  second  Olympic 
Ode  of  Pindar. 

H.  HUBBARD,    Registrary, 

Registry,  18 — 109- 
T  2 


292' 


LAW  SCHOOLS,  CAMBRIDGE, 
February  8,  1759- 

THE    BUSINESS    OF    ELECTING 
A   GREEK  LECTURER. 

ELECTORS    PRESENT  I 

The  Right  Worshipful  LYNFORD  CARYL,  D.D. 
Vice-Chancellor. 

[Other  Electors  mentioned.] 
The  other  Electors  having  been  duly  summoned. 

Me  present,  H.  HUB  BARD,  Registrar*/. 

The  Act  of  Parliament  made  31st  of  Eliz.  Cap.  6. 
intitled,  An  act  against  abuses  in  Elections  of  Scholars, 
&c.  and  part  of  the  Foundation  being  read,  Mr.  Vice- 
Chancellor  first  took  the  Oath  therein  prescribed,  and 
afterwards  administered  the  same  to  every  other  Elector 
above-mentioned  present. 

After  which,  the  Rev.  MICHAEL  LORT,  Master  of 
Arts,  one  of  the  Fellows  of  Trinity  College,  having  read 
the  Probation  Lecture,  according  to  appointment,  was 
chosen  into  the  said  vacant  Greek  Lectureship,  by 
Mr.  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  other  five  Electors  above- 
mentioned. 

L.  CARYL,  Vice- Chancellor. 

[Other  Electors  mentioned] 
Me  present,  H.  HUBBARD,  Registrary. 
Registry,   18 — 109. 


293 


Election  of  tljc  ysUntf*  licrtDrr  in 


The  Electors  are  the  same  as  for  the  King's 
Reader  in  Divinity.  Stat. 

They  are  to  be  summoned  in  the  same  manner 
as  when  the  Office  of  King's  Reader  in  Divinity 
is  vacant.  Stat. 

The  Candidate  must  be  a  Master  of  Arts 
at  least,  or  a  Bachelor  or  Doctor  in  Divinity. 
Stat. 

The  Candidates  are  to  be  examined,  as  to 
their  knowledge  of  the  Hebrew  language,  by  some 
Persons  skilled  therein;  and  on  certain  days, 
assigned  by  the  Electors,  are  to  interpret  a  part 
of  some  book,  written  in  this  language,  for  one 
hour,  in  the  Public  Schools.  Stat. 

On  the  day  following  the  reading  of  these 
Probationary  Lectures,  the  Electors  are  to  meet 
in  the  Public  Schools.  Stat. 

On  the  day  of  Election  precisely  the  same 
proceedings  take  place,  as  at  the  Election  of 
King's  Reader  in  Divinity. 


LAW  SCHOOLS,  CAMBRIDGE, 
October  28,  1757- 

THE    BUSINESS    OF    ELECTING 
AN   HEBREW    LECTURER. 

ELECTORS    PRESENT  : 

The  Right  Worshipful  JOHN  SUMNER,  D.D. 
Vice-Chancellor. 

[The  other  Electors  mentioned."] 

Me  present,  L.  CARYL,  Registrary. 

Richard  Jennings,  Yeoman  Bedell,  made  Oath 
that  he  duly  executed  the  intimation  of  the  Vacancy,  by 
affixing  the  same  on  the  School  gate,  and  at  the  West 
door  of  St.  Mary's  Church,  for  seven  days. 

WILLIAM  DISNEY,  M.A.  Fellow  of  Trinity  College, 
appeared  and  offered  himself  a  Candidate,  and  to  be 
examined. 

Mr.  Vice-Chancellor,  and  all  the  Electors  present, 
not  thinking  it  necessary  to  examine  Mr.  DISNEY  in 
public,  reserved  to  themselves  the  right  of  examining 
him  privately ;  and  appointed  to-morrow,  at  two  o'clock 
in  the  afternoon,  for  him  to  read  his  Probation  Lecture, 
upon  the  first,  or  the  eleventh,  or  the  twentieth  Chapter 
of  Genesis. 

Registry,  2 — 56. 


295 


LAW  SCHOOLS,  CAMBRIDGE, 
October  30,  1757. 

THE    BUSINESS    OF    CHOOSING 
AN  HEBREW  LECTURER. 

ELECTORS    PRESENT  I 

The  Right  Worshipful  JOHN  SUMNER,  D.D. 
Vice-Chancellor. 

[Other  Electors  mentioned, .] 

Me  present^  L.  CARYL,  Registrar?/. 

Part  of  the  Stat.  31  Q.  Eliz.  Cap.  6.  was  read, 
and  part  of  the  original  Foundation. 

Mr.  Vice-Chancellor  first  took  the  Oath  therein 
prescribed,  and  afterwards  the  other  four  Electors 
above-mentioned.  After  which  the  Rev.  W.  DISNEY, 
M.A.  one  of  the  Fellows  of  Trinity  College,  having 
read  the  Probationary  Lecture,  according  to  appointment, 
was  unanimously  chosen  into  the  said  Hebrew  Lec- 
tureship. 

J.  SUMNER,  Vice-Chancellor. 
[The  other  Electors  mentioned. ,] 

Registry,  % — 66. 


296 


appointment  of  tfje  tttng'*  IJrofraaor  of 
COnl 


He  is  appointed  by  the  King,  to  hold  his 
Office  during  his  good  behaviour. 

He  is  to  occupy  his  Place  by  himself,  or  his 
sufficient  Deputy,  to  be  approved  of  by  the 
Chancellor,  or  Vice-Chancellor  of  the  Uni- 

versity. 

• 

His  salary  is  forty  pounds  a  year,  to  be  paid 
quarterly  at  the  Exchequer. 

The  Patent  reserves  to  the  King,  his  Heirs, 
and  Successors,  full  power  and  authority  of  re- 
voking and  determining,  the  Grant  and  Letters 
Patent,  at  any  time  hereafter,  by  Letters  Patent 
under  the  Great  Seal  of  Great  Britain,  any  thing 
to  the  contrary  thereof  notwithstanding. 

The  following  is  the  Record  in  the  Registrary's 
Office  on  the  Appointment  of  Henry  •  Monson, 
LL.D.  of  Trinity  Hall  to  the  Professorship  : 

"  Be  it  remembered  that,  on  the  23d  of 
October,  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  1755,  the 
Worshipful  Henry  Monson,  Doctor  of  Civil  Law, 
appeared  before  me  Simeon  Lord,  Notary  Public, 
in  the  chamber  of  the  said  Henry  Monson,  within 
the  College,  or  Hall,  of  the  Holy  and  undivided 
Trinity,  in  the  University  of  Cambridge,  and 
exhibited  Letters  patent,  under  the  Great  Seal 
of  Great  Britain,  bearing  date  at  Westminster, 


297 


the  22d  day  of  July,  in  the  29th  year  of  our 
Sovereign  Lord  King  George  the  Second,  wit- 
nesses William  Duke  of  Cumberland,  and  other 
Guardians  of  the  Kingdom,  constituting  him 
the  said  Henry  Monson,  Reader  of  the  Insti- 
tutes of  Civil  Law,  within  the  University  of 
Cambridge,  in  the  place  of  Dr.  Francis  Dickins, 
the  last  Reader  thereof  in  the  said  University. 

"  This  I  attest, 

"  SIMEON  LORD,  Notary  Public. 
"  Registrary,  18  —  84." 

Appointment  of  tfjc  yrofr  esor  of  Vfji^tc. 

He  is  appointed  by  the  King  to  hold  the 
Office  during  his  natural  life. 

He  is  to  occupy  it  by  himself,  or  his  sufficient 
Deputy  or  Deputies,  to  be  first  approved  of  by 
the  Chancellor,  or  Vice-  Chancellor.  He  is  allowed 
the  annual  salary  of  forty  pounds,  to  be  received 
quarterly  at  the  Exchequer. 

The  following  Record  of  the  appointment 
of  Dr.  Haviland  is  taken  from  the  Registrar's 
Office: 

"  Be  it  remembered  that,  on  the  eleventh  day 
of  September,  in  the  year  of  our  Lord  one  thou- 
sand eight  hundred  and  seventeen,  John  Haviland, 
Doctor  in  Physic,  personally  appeared  before 
the  Right  Worshipful  James  Wood,  D.D.  Vice- 
Chancellor  of  the  University  of  Cambridge,  in 


298 

the  presence  of  me  Robert  Gee,  Notary  Public, 
and  then  and  there  exhibited  to  the  said  Vice- 
Chancellor  his  Majesty's  Letters  Patent,  under 
the  Great  Seal  of  England,  bearing  date  at 
Westminster  the  nineteenth  day  of  April  in  the 
fifty-  seventh  year  of  our  Sovereign  Lord,  King 
George  the  Third,  thereby  granting  to  the  said 
John  Haviland,  during  his  life,  the  Office  or 
Place  of  Reader  in  the  Science  of  Physic,  founded 
by  Henry  the  Eighth  heretofore  King  of  England, 
in  the  University  of  Cambridge,  which  said  Letters 
Patent  were  openly  read  by  me  the  said  Notary 
Public,  and  the  said  Vice-Chancellor  then  ad- 
ministered to  the  said  John  Haviland,  and  he 
took,  the  Oaths  which  the  Statutes  of  the  said 
University  require  to  be  taken  by  him  on  this 
behalf,  and  thereupon  the  said  Vice-Chancellor 
admitted  the  said  John  Haviland  into  the  said 
Office  or  Place  according  to  the  tenor  of  the  said 
Letters  Patent. 

"  This  I  attest, 

"  ROBERT  GEE,  Notary  Public." 


Election  of  a  Uucasian   l)rcfr$0or  of 


The  Professor  must  be  of  good  fame,  and 
honest  conversation,  well  learned5,  and  especially 
skilled  in  Mathematical  science.  See  orders  by 
Mr.  Lucas's  Executors,  1663  ;  Registrar?/,  G  —  1. 

5  Probe  erudiius. 


299 
He  must  be  a  Master  of  Arts  at  least.     Ibid. 

The  Electors  are  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the 
Masters  of  Colleges,  or  so  many  of  them  as  are 
present  at  the  Election.  Ibid. 

Upon  a  Vacancy,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  as 
soon  as  it  can  he  done,  is  to  signify  the  Vacancy, 
and  the  time  appointed  for  the  Election,  by 
a  Schedule  affixed  to  the  doors  of  the  Public 
Schools,  for  eight  continual  days.  Ibid. 

The  time  of  Election  must  not  be  delayed 
beyond  the  thirtieth  day  from  the  first  publication. 
Ibid. 

At  the  time  of  Election  the  Electors  meet 
in  the  Public  Schools.  Ibid. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  makes  Oath  that  the 
intimation  has  been  fixed  on  the  School  door 
for  eight  days. 

The  Act  31  Eliz.  Cap.  6.  and  part  of  the 
Foundation  are  read  by  the  Registrary. 

The  Electors  take  their  Oaths  —  seposito  omni 
private  respectu  qffectuque  sinistro,  se  nominaturos 
et  suo  comprobaturos  suffragio,  quern,  conscientia 
teste,  ex  Petitoribus,  (vel  ex  Us  qui  ab  Electorum 
quolibet  nominantur)  maxime,  secundum  prceno- 
tatas  qualitates  idoneum  censuerint  ad  id  Munus 
obeundum.  Ibid. 

The  Person,  who  has  the  most  votes,  is  to 
carry  the  Election.  Ibid. 


300 

In  case  of  an  equality,  the  Vice-Chancellor 
has  the  casting  vote.  Ibid. 

The  Person  elected  is  to  be  admitted,  the 
first  opportunity,  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  after 
having  taken  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supre- 
macy, and  the  following  Oath  of  Office : 

Se  Munus  Professoris  Mathematici  a  Dig- 
nissimo  Viro  Henrico  Lucas  in  hac  Academia 
institutum,  juxta  Ordinationes  et  Statuta  Qfficium 
suum  concernentia,  pro  suo  posse ,JideUter  executu- 
rum.  Ibid. 

He  subscribes  the  Declaration  of  Conformity 
in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  book,  p.  238. 

ELECTION   OF   MB.  LUCAS'*   PROFESSOR 
OF    MATHEMATICS. 

December  7,   1826* 

At  a  meeting  of  the  Heads  of  Colleges  in  the  Law 
Schools,  for  the  Election  of  a  Lecturer  into  the  Lec- 
tureship, founded  by  HENRY  LUCAS,  Esq.,  vacant  by 
the  resignation  of  the  Rev.  THOMAS  TURTON.,  B.D. 
of  Catharine  Hall. 

PRESENT : 

The  Right  Worshipful  CHRISTOPHER  WORDSWORTH, 
D.D.  Vice-Chancellor, 
[and  other  Electors.] 
Me  present,  W.  HUSTLER,  Reg.  and  Not.  Pub. 

The  Act  of  Parliament  of  the  31st  Eliz.  Cap.  6. 
entitled,  An  Act  against  abuses  in  Elections  of  Scholars, 
&c.  and  part  of  the  Deed  of  Foundation,  and  the  Grant 


301 

of  King  Charles  the  Second,  being  read  by  the  Hegis- 
trary,  the  Yeoman  Bedell.,  William  Jiggins,  was  called 
and  sworn  "  that  the  notice  of  Vacancy  and  day  of 
Election  had  been  fixed  upon  the  School  doors  for 
eight  successive  days."  Then  the  Vice-Chancellor  took 
the  Oath,  which  was  read  to  him  by  the  Registrary,  as 
nearly  as  could  be  in  the  words  of  the  Foundation  Deed. 
After  which  the  Registrary  administered  fc  Idem  Jura- 
mentum,  quod  pr&stitit  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius,  fyc." 
to  the  rest  of  the  Electors. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads  then  proceeded 
to  nominate  and  prick  Mr.  BABBAGE,  M.A.  of  Trinity 
College,  and  Mr.  AIRY,  M.A.  Fellow  of  Trinity  College. 
Mr.  AIRY  having  the  majority  of  votes,  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor declared  him  duly  elected. 

Shortly  afterwards,  on  the  same  day,  Mr.  AIRY 
attended  at  the  Lodge  of  Trinity  College,  and  having 
taken  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and  the 
Oath  of  Office  contained  in  the  Deed  of  Foundation, 
he  subscribed  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book,  and  was 
admitted  Lucasian  Professor  "  in  Nomine  Patris,  et 
Filii,  et  Spiritus  Sancti/'  by  the  Vice-Chancellor. 

In  the  presence  of  me, 

W.  HUSTLER,   Reg.  and  Not.  Pub. 

Bookf  No.  2.  of  Election  of  Professors.  Registry. 


Election  of  an  &rafuc  lj)roft00or. 

He  is  to  be  of  good  fame,  and  of  an  honest 
conversation;  a  Master  of  Arts  at  least,  well 
learned6,  and  skilled  in  the  Oriental  languages; 


6  Probe 


302 

especially  in  Arabic;  and  who  has  no  other 
Professorship,  or  Lectureship 7,  unless  he  is  willing 
to  resign  it  before  his  Admission  to  this. 

Amongst  Persons  so  qualified,  Masters  of 
Colleges  first,  then  Fellows  of  Colleges,  and  then 
Masters  of  Arts,  being  Gremials  of  the  Uni- 
versity, are  to  be  preferred. 

The  Electors  are  the  Vice-Chancellor,  all 
Masters  of  Colleges,  or  those  of  them  who  shall 
be  present  at  the  Election. 

Upon  a  Vacancy,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  as  soon 
as  it  can  be  done,  is  to  signify  the  Vacancy,  and 
the  time  of  the  Election,  by  a  Schedule  to  be 
affixed  to  the  door  of  the  Public  Schools,  for  eight 
continual  days. 

The  time  of  the  Election  must  not  be  deferred 
beyond  the  thirtieth  day  from  the  first  significa- 
tion. 

Grant  by  Sir  T.  Adams,  dated  June  20,  1666. 

Registry,  G — 3. 

At  the  time  of  the  Election,  the  Electors  meet 
in  the  Public  Schools.  Grant. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  swears  that  the  intimation 
has  been  fixed  to  the  School  door  for  eight  days 
successively8. 

7  Qui  nullo  alio  Professionis  aut  Lecturse  Loco  seu  Officio 
gaudet. 

8  For  four  hours  each  day.  Elections,  1768,  1770. 


303 

Part  of  the  Act  of  Parliament  31  Eliz.  Cap.  6. 
and  part  of  the  original  Foundation,  were  read  at 
the  Election,  17689. 

The  Electors  take  an  Oath — seposito  omni 
private  respectu  affectuque  sinistro,  se  nomina- 
turos,  vel  saltern  suo  comprobaturos  suffragio, 
quern  conscientia  teste,  ex  Petitoribus,  vel  ex  Us 
qui  ab  Electorum  quolibet  nominantur,  maxime 
secundum  prcenotatas  qualitates  et  limitationes 
idoneum  censuerint  ad  id  Munus  obeundum. 
Grant. 

The  Person  who  has  the  most  votes,  is  to  carry 
the  Election.  Ibid. 

In  case  of  an  equality  of  votes,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  has  a  casting  one.  Ibid. 

The  Person  elected  is  to  be  admitted  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  as  soon  as  there  is  an  opportunity 
after  having  taken  an  Oath- — se  Munus  Pro- 
fessor is  Arabici  a  Thoma  Adams,  Milite  et 
Baronetto,  in  hac  Academia  institution,  juxta 
Ordinationes  et  Statuta  Qfficium  suum  concer- 
nentia,  pro  suo  virili,Jideliter  executurum.  Ibid. 

9  But  at  the  Election  1770,  the  Registrary  read  part  of 
the  Foundation  only,  not  the  Act  31  Eliz.  that  being  thought 
unnecessary. 


304 


LAW  SCHOOLS,  CAMBRIDGE, 
March  11,  1819- 

ELECTION    OF    AN    ARABIC    PROFESSOR 

IN    THE    ROOM    OF    MR.  PALMER,    RESIGNED. 

ELECTORS  PRESENT: 

The  Hon.  and  Right  Worshipful  GEORGE  NEVILLE,  M.A, 
Vice-Chancellor,   and    Master    of 
Magdalene  College. 

[The  other  Electors  mentioned.^ 

Me  present,  W.  HUSTLER,  Registrary. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  read  Mr.  Palmer's  resignation. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell,  John  Laughton,  swore  that  the 
Schedule  of  Vacancy  and  day  of  Election  had  been 
affixed  to  the  School  door  for  eight  days  successively, 
for  four  hours  each  day. 

The  Registrary  read  part  of  the  Statute  31  Eliz. 
Cap.  6,  and  part  of  the  original  Foundation. 

The  V ice-Chancellor  first  took  the  Oath,  as  nearly 
as  might  be  in  the  words  of  the  Foundation,  and  then 
the  Registrary  administered  (e  Idem  Juramentum"  &c. 
to  the  rest  of  the  Electors  above-mentioned. 

The  Vice-Chancellor  nominated  Mr.  SAMUEL  LEE 
of  Queen's  College,  and  Dr.  BARNES  nominated  Mr. 
KEENE  of  Sidney  College. 


305 


The  Vice-Chancellor  declared  Mr.  LEE  duly  elected. 

Mr.  LEE  came  to  the  Schools.  The  Registrary 
read  a  part  of  the  Charter  of  Foundation,  which  re- 
lated to  his  Office  and  Duty. 

Mr.  LEE  subscribed  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book, 
took  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and  the 
Oath  of  Office  (in  the  words  of  the  Charter),  and  was 
then  admitted  to  the  Professorship  by  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor. 

All  this  was  done  in  the  presence  of  me, 

W.  HUSTLER,  Registrary. 

The  Election  was  by  drawing  lines  opposite  to  the 
Persons  nominated,  and  pricking. 

Registry  18 — 114. 


Horn  &lntonir'#  I9roft0*or  of 


This   Office  is   in   the   Appointment   of  the 
Lord  Almoner. 


Election  of  ti)r  <ffa0ui0ttttil  ]|rof*0*or* 

The  Electors  are,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the 
Regius  Professor  of  Divinity,  the  Lady  Mar- 
garet's Professor  of  Divinity,  and  the  Master 
of  St.  Peter's  College. 

If  two  of  the  Electors  be  for  one  Person,  and 
two  for  another,  the  Master  of  St.  Peter's  is  to 
have  the  casting  vote. 

U 


306 

The  Professor  must  be  a  Bachelor  or  Doctor 
of  Divinity,  and  forty  years  of  age,  or  upwards. 

See  a  Decree  of  Chancery,  34  Car.  II.  copied 
in  a  Register  of  St.  Peter's  College. 

A  Programma  is  published,  signifying  the 
Vacancy,  and  the  time  fixed  upon  for  the  Election. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  swears  to  its'having  been 
fixed  up. 

"  Dec.  27,  1764. 

"  At  a  Meeting  this  day  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's 
Lodgings,  Edmund  Law,  Doctor  in  Divinity,  and 
Master  of  St.  Peter's  College,  was  unanimously 
chosen  to  be  Professor  in  Moral  Theology,  or 
Casuistical  Divinity,  of  the  Foundation  of  Dr. 
Knightbridge,  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Regius 
Professor  in  Divinity,  and  the  Master  of  St.  Peter's. 

"  In  witness  whereof  we  have  hereunto  set  our 
names,  the  day  and  year  above  written. 

fc  J.  BARNARDISTON,   Vice- Chancellor. 

(f  T.  RUTHERFORTH,  Regius  Professor  in  Divinity. 

tc  E.  LAW,  Master  of  St.  Peters  College." 

* 

Edmundus  Law,  S.  T.  P.  admissus  fuit  ad 
Officium  sive  Munus  Professoris  Casuistici,  sive 
Moralis  Theologies  in  hac  Academia,  per  Doc- 
tor em  Joannem  Barnardiston,  S.  T.  P.  Dominum 
Pro-Cancellarium,  inter  horas  \Tam  et  I™"1  post 
merid.  27m£  diei  Decembris  1764 ;  In  prcesentia 
mei  Henrici  Hubbard,  Jlegistrarii  Principally 
Universitatis  Cantdbr. 

Registry,  12—76. 


307 

mtttion  of  tfi*  illwnian  Wrotasaor  of 

antr  (?.tpcrtmnttal 


The  Electors  are,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the 
Masters  of  Trinity,  Christ's,  and  Caius  Colleges, 
and  the  Lucasian  Professor. 

If  any  of  these  Masters  be  Vice-Chancellor, 
the  Master  of  St.  John's  College  is  to  be  in  his 
room. 

See  Queen  Anne's  confirmation  of  the  Statutes 
given  by  Dr.  Plume's  Trustees  11  Jun.  6  Anna. 
Registry,  II — 7. 

The  Professorship  being  vacant,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  as  soon  as  it  can  be  done,  is  to  sig- 
nify the  Vacancy,  and  the  time  of  the  Election, 
by  a  writing  affixed  to  the  door  of  the  Public 
Schools.  Ibid. 

The  Election  is  not  to  be  before  the  30th  day 
after  the  Schedule  is  fixed,  nor  protracted  beyond 
the  sixtieth.  Ibid. 

The  Candidates  may  be  Bachelors,  or  married 
men,  Englishmen1,  or  foreigners.  Ibid. 

The  Electors  are  to  meet  in  the  Public 
Schools. 

The  Yeoman  Bedell  makes  oath,  &c.  con- 
cerning the  affixing  of  the  notice. 

1    Nostrates. 


308 

The  Electors  are  to  take  an  Oath  —  se  nemi- 
nem  gratia,  ambitione,  vel  pr&mio,  inductos,  sed 
eum  solum  quern,  conscientia  teste,  huic  Muneri 
maxime  idoneum  consuerint,  electuros.  Ibid. 

Every  one  of  the  Electors  may,  by  himself 
or  others,  examine  any  of  the  Candidates.  Ibid. 

He,  who  is  elected  Professor,  must  have  at 
least  three  votes.  Ibid. 

If  three  of  the  Electors  do  not  on  the  sixtieth 
day  agree  upon  the  same  Person,  he  is  to  be 
chosen,  whom  the  Chancellor  of  the  University, 
and  any  two  of  the  Electors  shall  think  most 
worthy.  Ibid. 

The  Professor  subscribes  the  Declaration  of 
Conformity  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book. 

He  takes  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  is  immediately  admitted  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  after  having  sworn  —  se  Munus 
Professoris  Astronomies  et  Philosophise  Expert- 
mentalis  a  Reverendo  Viro  Thoma  Plume  in 
hac  Academia  institutum,  secundum  Ordinationes 
de  eo  conditas,  fideliter  et  pro  virili  executurum. 
Ibid. 


309 

PLUMIAN    PROFESSOR. 

Januarii  tertio  die,  1822. 

IN    SCHOLIS    PUBLICIS. 

Me  presente,  THOMA  DICKES,  Reg0.  Deput0. 

Convenerunt  ad  eligendum  Prqfessorem  As- 
tronomies et  Philosophise  Experimentalis  secun- 
dum  Programma  a  Pro-Cancellario  publicatum, 
et  Scholarum  Publicarum  januce  affixum, 

Gulielmus  French,  Pro-Cancellarius. 
Christopherus  Wordsworth,  Magr.  Coll.  S.S.  Trin. 
Johannes  Episcopus  Sristoliensis,  Magr.  Coll.  Chr. 
Martinus  Davy,  Magr.  Coll.  Gonv:  et  Cai. 
Robertus  Woodhouse,  Professor  Lucasianus. 

X 

Et  eodem  die  nos  infra  scripti  elegimus 
ROBERTUM  WOODHOUSE,  A.M.  supra  dictum. 

GUL.  FRENCH,  Pro-Cane. 
(et  alii  Elector es.) 

Eodem  die  juratus  et  admissus  est  Robertus 
Woodhouse,  a  GuL  French,  Pro-Cane. 

Me  presente,  THOMA  DICKES,  Reg0.  Deput0. 

N.B.  Part  of  the  Grant  and  part  of  the 
Statute  of  31  Eliz.  were  read. 

Registry,  18 


310 
of  J&oftrcn  Iijtetorp,  ana 


He  is  appointed  by  the  King.  See  the  original 
Grant  in  the  Registry. 

He  is  to  be —  Vir  honestate  morum,  et  pru- 
dentia9  lauddbilis ;  a.  Master  of  Arts,  or  Bachelor 
of  Law,  or  of  a  superior  degree.  Ibid. 

The  Professor  is  to  exhibit  the  instrument  by 
which  he  is  appointed,  to  the  Vice-Chancellor ; 
and  after  having  taken  the  under-written  Oath, 
which  is  administered  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  he 
is  by  him  admitted  to  the  Professorship. 

He  is  to  hold  it  for  one  year  from  the  time 
of  his  Admission.  Ibid. 

The  form  of  the  Oath  is : 

Ego  A.  B.  nominatus  Professor  Regius  His- 
torice  Moderna,  juro  mefideliter,  pro  meo  posse, 
observaturum  omnes  Ordinationes,  et  Statuta, 
Munus  et  Qfficium  meum  concernentia.  Sicut 
Deus  me  adjuvet  per  Jesum  Christum  hoc  Sacro- 
Sancto  Evangelio  enunciatum. 

He  is  to  choose,  and  allow  proper  salaries  to 
two  Preceptors,  at  least,  in  the  University ;  who 
are  to  observe  his  directions,  and  are  to  instruct, 
gratis,  twenty  Scholars  in  modern  languages; 
which  Scholars  are  to  be  nominated  by  the  King, 
by  an  instrument  under  his  hand,  and  are  re- 
moveable  at  his  pleasure,  by  a  like  instrument. 
They  are  to  be  of  two  years  standing  complete, 


311 

to  be  reckoned  from  their  Matriculation,  before 
they  are  nominated,  and  may  continue  three  years 
from  the  time  of  their  nomination.  Ibid. 

The  late  Professor,  Dr.  Symonds,  agreed  with 
the  Heads  of  Colleges  to  admit  to  his  Lectures, 
free  from  expence,  twenty-six  Scholars,  to  be 
nominated  by  them. 

No  other  Persons  were  to  be  admitted  except 
Noblemen  and  Fellow-Commoners  with  their 
Tutors,  all  of  whom  were  to  pay  for  their 
admission. 

The  present  Professor  (W.  Smyth,  Esq.)  has 
thrown  the  Lectures  open  to  the  whole  Uni- 
versity, all  the  Members  of  which  are  admitted 
free  from  expence,  except  Noblemen  and  Fellow- 
Commoners,  who  pay  the  usual  price  of  admission 
to  other  Lectures. 

The  following  Record  of  Admission  to  the 
Professorship  is  taken  from  a  book  in  the  Re- 
gistrary's  Office : 

Memorandum  quod  vicesimo  die  mensis  De- 
cembris,  anno  Domini  1762 : 

Reverendus  Vir  LAURENTIUS  BROCKETT, 
S.  T.  B.  Collegii  Sanctee  et  Individuce  Trinitatis, 
in  Universitate  Cantabrigiensi,  Socius,  admissus 
fuit  Professor  Moderns  Historic?,  in  Universi- 
tate prcedicta,  juxta  tenorem  nominations  sute, 
sigillo  et  manu  Augustissimi  Georgii  Tertii, 
Magnce  Britannia,  $c.  Regis,  Jideique  Defen- 
soris  munita,  dat. '  geren.  apud  Palatium  Sancti 


312 

Jacobi,  decimo  tertio  die  Decembris,  1762,  per 
Venerabilem  Firum  Petrum  Stephanum  Goddard, 
S.  T.  P.  Pro-Cancellarium  dicta  Universitatis, 
praestito  prius  per  dictum  Laurentium  Brockett 
juramento  in  ea  parte  requisite. 

Mepr&sente,  Henrico  Hubbard,  Universitatis 
prcedictce  Registrario  Principali. 

N.B.  The  Professor  .subscribed  the  Decla- 
ration of  Conformity  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's 
Book,  took  the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Su- 
premacy, and  was  admitted  in  form  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor ;  Auihoritate  mihi  commissa, 
Ego  admitto,  $c. 


of  .Hotontre's  Hetronomical 
<ftromctrtcal 


He  is  appointed  by  the  Lord  High  Chan- 
cellor, or  Lord  Keeper  of  the  Great  Seal  of 
Great  Britain,  the  Lord  President  of  the  Privy 
Council,  the  Lord  Privy  Seal,  the  Lord  High 
Treasurer,  or  the  first  Lord  Commissioner  of  the 
Treasury,  the  Lord  Steward  of  the  King's  House- 
hold, or  the  major  part  of  them. 

See  a  copy  of  the  Will  of  Mr.  Lownde  in 
the  possession  of  the  Vice  -Chancellor,  dated 
May  6,  1748;  proved  June  4,  1748. 

The  Professor  subscribes  the  form  in  the  Vice- 
Chancellor's  Book.  See  p.  238. 


313 


The  Electors  are,  the  Chancellor,  and  all  other 
Members  of  the  Senate,  the  Archbishop  of  Canter- 
bury, the  Bishop  of  Ely,  the  President  of  the 
College  of  Physicians,  the  President  of  the  Royal 
Society,  and  the  two  Members  of  Parliament  for 
the  University. 

The  Lecturer  is,  from  time  to  time,  chosen 
after  each  Vacancy  of  the  Predecessor,  within 
the  space  of  two  months  at  farthest,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  causing  public  notice  to  be  timely 
given  by  billets  fixed  upon  the  Public  Schools, 
and  by  advertisements  printed  in  the  Gazette, 
or  some  other  like  authentic  public  Newspaper. 

None  are  to  be  chosen  but  Bachelors,  or  Men 
that  have  not  been  married :  and,  in  case  of  the 
marriage  of  any  of  the  Lecturers  afterwards^  his 
Election  shall  thereby  be  immediately  made  void. 
If  a  Divine  shall  be  Competitor  with  a  Layman, 
in  case  the  latter  should  be  as  well  qualified, 
he  shall  have  preference  of  the  former. 

No  one  shall  at  any  time  be  chosen  Lecturer, 
who  hath  any  Preferment,  Office,  or  Post  what- 
soever, that  shall  any  ways  so  employ  or  take  up 
his  time,  as  to  interfere  with  his  duty;  and,  in 
particular,  that  shall  require  his  attendance  out 
of  the  University. 

The  Chancellor  of  the  University,  the  Arch- 
bishop, Bishop  of  the  diocese,  the  two  Presidents, 


314 

and  the  two  Members  of  Parliament,  may  vote 
by  Proxy. 

At  a  Congregation,  or  a  Convocation,  if  there 
be  a  Certificate  of  the  Vacancy,  it  is  read  by 
the  Senior  Proctor. 

He  gives  notice  of  the  Vacancy,  and  the  time 
of  Election : 

Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius  omnibus  notumjhcit 
quorum  id  scire  interfuerit,  Prcelecturam  a  Cla- 
rissimo  Viro  Johanne  Woodward  fundatam,  jam 

vacare,  per et  assignat  horam diei 

pro  Electione  Prcelectoris. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  the  two  Proctors,  and 
the  Junior  Doctor  in  Divinity,  stand  in  Scrutiny. 

A  Bedell  calls,,  Ad  Scrutinium,  &p. 
The  votes  are  in  this  form : 

A.  B.  digit in  Prcdectorem  Wood- 

wardianum     hujus     Academics,     obligandumque 

censet  in  summa librarum,  sub  conditione 

bene  et  fideliter  curandi  res  in  hoc  suo  Munere 
fidei  suce  Commissas. 

A  Person  appointed  Proxy,  produces  the 
letter  (on  a  stamp)  by  which  he  is  appointed, 
and  writes  at  the  bottom  of  it,  Ut  Procurator 

his   prcesentibus   literis    legitime    con- 

stitutus,  Ego  A.  B.  eligo  C.  D.  in  Pr&lectorem 
Woodwardianum  hujus  Academic,  &p.  as  above. 

The  voting,  &c.  is  as  at  the  Election  of  a  Clerk 
to  a  Living.  See  p.  251. 


315 

The  Person  elected  goes  to  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor's table,  and  executes  a  Bond  to  the  Uni- 
versity to  perform  Covenants ;  in  which  he  is 
joined  by  another  Person. 

He  subscribes  the  Declaration  of  Conformity 
in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book,  (see  p.  S38.)  takes 
the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and  the 
Vice-Chancellor  administers  to  him  the  Oath  of 
Office.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  530. 

Appointment  of  a  PROXY. 

Know  all  men  by  these  presents,  that  I  A.  B. 
da  appoint  C.  Z).  to  be  my  Proxy,  to  vote  at 
the  Election  of  a  Woodwardian  Lecturer,  on 

the  —  day   of next.      In    witness 

whereof,  I  have  hereunto  set  my  hand  and  seal, 
this  —  day   of  — — -  one  thousand . 

A.B.  e 

Sealed  and  delivered  (being  first  duly  stampt) 
in  the  presence  of 

E.  F. 
G.  H. 

The  following  proceedings  respecting  this  Pro- 
fessorship have  taken  place  since  the  Vacancy 
in  1818. 

The  following  notice  was  published  by  the 
Senior  Proctor  Maij  8,  1818. 

JDominus  Pro-Cancellarius  omnibus  notum 
facit  quorum  id  scire  interfuerit,  Prcelecturam 


316 

a  Clarissimo  Viro  Johanne  Woodward  fundatam, 
jam  vacare  per  cessionem  Johannis  Hailstone 
Prcelectoris  ultimi,  et  assignat  horam  undecimam 
A.  M.  vicesimi  primi  diei  Mail  pro  Electione  novi 
Prcelectoris. 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Dr.  Davy,  Dr.  Thackeray, 
Dr.  Wood,  Dr.  Clark,  Dr.  Haviland,  Magr. 
Cation,  Mag.  Hinde,  Mag*.  Chapman,  Magr. 
J.  Brown,  Coll.  Trin.  Magr.  Hustler,  Coll.  Trin. 
Magr.  jBridge,  Mag .  Turton,  Syndici  constitu- 
antur,  qui  consulant  et  Vobis  referant  de  Regulis 
et  Ordinationibus,  quibus  ultima  voluntas  Doctoris 
Woodward  optime  promoveatur.  Lect.  et  Concess. 
Mai.  8. 

May  20.  The  following  Report  of  the  above 
Syndicate  was  made  to,  and  confirmed  by, 
the  SENATE: 

1.  It  appears  that  the  clear  annual  income 
of  the   Woodwardian  estates  is  about  <£430.,  of 
which  the  sum  of  £108.  6s.  6d.  is  paid  to  the 
Lecturer  for  his  own  use,  and  about  fifty  pounds 
are  applied  to  other  purposes,  in  conformity  with 
the  will  of  Dr.  Woodward. 

2.  That  there  is   an  accumulation  of  about 
J1200.   which   has   been  invested  in  the  Public 
Funds. 

3.  That  the  room,  in  which  the  Fossils  and 
Minerals  are  at  present  kept,  being  too  confined 
to  exhibit  them  to  advantage,  or  to  receive  many 
more  with  convenience,  it  is  desirable  that  a  larger 


317 

should  be  built,  with  a  contiguous  room,  for  the 
accommodation  of  the  Lecturer. 

4.  It  is  proposed  that,  to  effect  this  object 
as   soon   as   possible,  the   surplus   annual  income 
shall   be   added  to  the  above  accumulation,  with 
the     exception     of    such    sums    as    it    may    be 
judged  proper  to  apply  to  the  purchase  of  Fossils 
and  Books,  and  to  other  necessary  purposes. 

5.  That  to  entitle  the  Woodwardian  Lecturer 
to   the   receipt   of  his    annual    Stipend,    it  shall 
be  certified  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  that  Lectures 
have  been  given. 

6.  It  is  agreed  that  the  knowledge  of  Fossil 
organized  bodies,  and  of  the  Constitution  of  the 
Earth's  Strata  having  been  very  much  extended 
since  the  time  of  Dr.  AVoodward,  it  would  conduce 
to  the  diffusion  of  science,  and  to  the  credit  of 
the  University,  as  it  would  certainly  be  in  perfect 
conformity  with  the  will  of  Dr.  Woodward,  that 
a   course   of  Lectures   should   be   read   on   these 
subjects  :  and  if,  after  a  new  room  has  been  built, 
the   Professor,   in   addition  to  the  Lectures  and 
duties   prescribed   by   the   Founder,    should   give 
such  a  course,  it  is  proposed  that  his  Stipend  be 
increased  by  one  hundred  pounds  a  year,  and  that 
all  Members  of  the  University  have  free  Admis- 
sion. 

Jan.  24,  1821. 

Cum  Professor  vester  Woodwardianus,  Fun- 
datoris  sui  Instituta  et  Consulta  Syndicorum 
vestrorum  secutus,  Lecture  isti  penitus  se  tradi- 
derit  multo  et  felici  labore,  et  impensis  suis  hmal 


318 

exiguis :  Lectiones  etiam  Geological  secundutn 
ipsorum  Syndicorum  Consulta  (prater  quatuor 
solennes  a  Fundatore  prascriptas)  gratis  in  Aca- 
demia  dederit,  jam  vero  ex  interpretation  Con- 
sultorum  pradictorum,  centum  libra  Professoris 
Stipendio  ob  Lectiones  istas  addenda,  non,  nisi 
post  Museum  supellectili  Geologica  adificatum 
solvi  possint  sine  auctoritate  vestra : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ne  ob  moras  alienas  Professor 
vester  pramio  suo  car  eat,  ut  summa  centum  libra- 
rum,  ob  Lectiones  Geologicas  anno  jam  praterito 
habitas,  ei  exsolvatur : 

X 

Placeat  etiam  Vobis,  ut  eadem  summa  singulis 
annis,  cursu  Lectionum,  numero  ad  minimum 
quindecim,  (prater  quatuor  istas  solennes  a  Fun- 
datore prascriptas)  confecto,  ei  erogetur. 

Cum  Fosilia  a  Doctore  Woodward  Academics 
nostra  legata,  adhuc  sint  deposita  in  cedibus  nee 
dignis  nee  idoneis,  quaque  additamentis  istis,  qua 
postulat  scientia  Geologica  conditio,  recipiendis 
minime  sufficiant,  magno  totius  Academia  damno, 
Lectorisque  vestri  gram  incommodo : 

Mar.  14,  1821. 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Dominus  Pro-Cancellarius, 
Dr.  French,  Dr.  Clarke,  Dr.  Haviland,  Dr. 
Thackeray,  Professor  Sedgwick,  Magr.  Bland, 
Hagr.  Alderson,  Magr.  Shelford,  Mag*.  Lodge, 
Magr.  Whewell,  Mag.  Graham,  Syndici  vestri 
constituantur,  qui  de  adibus  struendis,  impensis, 
caterisque  ad  hanc  rem  pertinentibus  consulant, 
atque  infra  ires  menses  ad  Vos  referant. 


319 

11  Jun.  1821.  Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Syndici  Musei 
Woodwardiani,  per  Gratiam  vestram  Martii  die 
decimo  quarto  anni  1821,  iidem  in  eodem  Qfficio 
permaneant,  proviso  tamen  ut  post  primam  Con- 
gregationem  Termini  Paschalis  anni  1822  habi- 
tant, auctoritate  sua  penitus  priventur,  nisi  denuo 
a  Vobis  constituantur : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Professor  Gumming  in 
numerum  prcedictorum  Syndicorum  cooptetur. 

5  Dec.  Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Dr.  Wordsworth 
inscribatur  in  numero  Syndicorum,  "  qui  de  cedibus 
Woodwardianis  struendis,  impensis,  cceterisque 
hanc  rem  pertinentibus,  consulant  atque  ad  Vos 
referant. 

No  report  was  ever  made  to  the  Senate  by 
the  above  Syndicate. 


Election  of  tfjc  jlortt^tan 

The  Stewards  of  the  Institution  are  the 
Master  of  Trinity  College,  the  Provost  of  King's 
College,  and  the  Master  or  President  of  Caius 
College.  Grant  in  the  Common  Chest  of  the  Uni- 
versity. 

The  Candidate,  or  Candidates,  shall  notice  to 
the  three  Stewards,  under  hand,  within  the  first 
fourteen  days  of  November,  the  design  of  sup- 
plying this  Professorship ;  and  the  Stewards  shall 
select  two  out  of  the  whole  number  of  Candidates, 


320 

and  shall  signify  their  names,  on  or  before  the 
first  day  of  February  then  next  ensuing,  to  the 
respective  Masters,  Heads  or  Presidents  of  all  the 
respective  Colleges  and  Halls  in  the  University 
of  Cambridge ;  and  the  day  of  Election,  or  final 
appointment  of  one  Person  to  the  Trust  shall  be 
within  the  first  fourteen  days  of  the  succeeding 
May;  and  the  Election,  or  Appointment,  shall 
be  wholly  vested  in  the  suffrages,  personally  given, 
of  all  the  aforesaid  Masters,  Heads,  or  Presi- 
dents ;  and  the  majority  of  votes  shall  decide 
the  Election. 

Not  less  than  ten  votes  shall  constitute  this 
mode  of  Election ;  and  upon  supposition  that 
there  is  no  agreement  as  to  the  selection  of  two 
Candidates,  but  warm  disputation,  such  selection 
shall  be  referred  to  a  majority  of  all  the  Heads, 
Masters,  or  Presidents;  due  regard  to  be  ever 
paid  to  the  virtuous  conversation  and  abilities 
of  each  Candidate.  As  to  the  latter,  an  ex- 
amination, if  required,  to  be  passed  by  each 
Candidate  before  the  Stewards,  or  their  Deputies, 
both  antecedently  to  the  Nomination,  and  to  the 
Election.  Ibid. 

To  bestow  ,on  the  Master  of  Trinity  an  ad- 
ditional influence,  he  shall,  if  he  pleaseth,  defer 
his  vote  to  the  last ;  and  if  the  numbers  are  even 
with  his  vote,  his  vote  shall  carry  the  Election, 
as  if  he  had  two  votes,  and  could  use  them  both 
in  favour  of  one  Person.  Ibid. 

If  required  by  two  of  the  three  Stewards,  any 
Candidate  shall  take  and  subscribe  to  the  Oath 


321 

hereafter  drawn  up,  on  or  before  the  twentieth 
of  January.  But  the  Founder  makes  it  an 
indispensable  condition  that  the  Candidate  or 
Candidates  shall  each  take  and  subscribe  to  the 
Oath  afore-mentioned,  in  the  presence  of  at  least 
ten  of  the  Heads,  Masters,  or  Presidents,  on  the 
morning  of  Election.  The  words,  and  all  the 
words,  of  such  Oath  shall  be  spoken  articulately 
and  audibly ;  then  signed  and  then  attested  by 
each  of  the  aforesaid  ten  Heads,  Masters,  or 
Presidents.  If  such  Oath  be  not  formally  taken, 
subscribed,  attested,  the  Election  shall  not  take 
place ;  at  least  shall  be  void,  and  shall  not  entitle 
the  Person  elected  to  a  farthing  of  the  salary.  Ibid. 

The  Professor  may  have  been  educated  at 
either  of  our  English  Universities ;  may  be  Lay 
or  Clerical :  but  he  shall  not  be  elected  into  the 
Office  under  his  thirtieth  year,  nor  re-elected 
after  his  sixtieth.  Ibid. 

He  shall  be  obnoxious  to  dispossession  at  any 
time  by  a  majority  of  the  Heads,  Masters,  or 
Presidents  of  the  respective  Colleges  and  Halls 
of  this  University  of  Cambridge.  But  then  the 
objections,  or  objection,  to  him  shall  be  testified 
under  the  hand  of  each  such  majority.  Ibid. 

The  Master  of  Trinity  shall  have  the  same 
Privilege  here  as  given  him  at  the  Election. 
Ibid. 

No  Professor  shall  be  allowed  to  continue  in 
his  Office*  without  a  fresh  Election,  for  more 
than  five  successive  years. 

X 


322 

The  Oath  hereafter  inserted  shall  be  as  ne- 
cessary to  the  Validity  of  a  Re-election  as  of 
the  first  Election.  Ibid. 

The  OATH. 

As  I  profess  to  believe  that  the  Godhead,  or 
the  Divine  and  One  only  Independant  Essence 
comprehendeth  three  Persons,  the  Father,  and 
the  Son  or  the  Word,  who  was  made  flesh  and 
dwelled  amongst  us,  and  the  Holy  Ghost,  or 
Holy  Spirit  —  So  I  swear  that  I  will  not  know- 
ingly and  designedly,  if  I  shall  be  elected  into 
that  Trust  to  which  this  Oath  is  made  prepara- 
tory, either  inculcate,  or  countenance,  in  my 
discharge  of  the  said  Trust,  any  Doctrines 
contrary  to  my  present  sense  of  the  Profession 
which  I  have  now  thus  publickly  made  of  my 
religious  belief 

Amen.     So  help  me  God.     Ibid. 


Or  this  OATH. 

As  I  profess  to  believe  in  One  God,  the 
Father  Almighty,  and  in  one  Lord  Jesus  Christ, 
the  only  begotten  Son  of  God,  God  of  God, 
Light  of  Light,  Very  God  of  Very  God  — 
and  in  the  Holy  Ghost,  the  Lord  and  Giver 
of  Life,  proceeding  from  the  Father  and  the 
Son,  and  together  with  them  worshipped  and 
glorified;  so  I  swear  that  I  will  not,  knowingly 
and  designedly,  if  I  shall  be  elected  into  that  Trust 


323 

to  which  this  Oath  is  made  preparatory)  either 
inculcate,  or  countenance,  in  my  discharge  of 
the  said  Trust,  any  Doctrines  contrary  to  the 
Profession,  which  I  have  now  thus  publicity  made, 
of  my  Belief  of  the  Holy  Blessed  and  Glorious 
Trinity,  Three  Pep-sons,  and  One  God. 

Amen.     So  help  me  God.     Ibid. 

The  Professor  subscribes  the  form  in  the  Vice- 
Chancellor's  Book. 


NORRISIAN  PROFESSORSHIP. 

FORM  OF  NOMINATION. 

Jan.  25,    1?80.2 

We  nominate  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  and   Heads  of 
Colleges }  The  Reverend  ,  and  The  Reverend 

.  to    be    Candidates    for    the    Norrisian    Pro- 

fessorship. 

JOHN  PETERBOROUGH,  Master  of  Trinity  College. 

WILLIAM  COOKE,  Provost  of  King's. 

J.  SMITH,   Master  of  Gonvil  and  Cains  College. 

Registry,  L. — 83. 

May  1,  1780.      The  Election  was  by  pricking. 
Oath  of  the  Norrisian  Professor. 
Subscribed,  A.  B. 

9  N.B.  A  printed  notice  of  the  Vacancy  in  1795,  was  put 
up  in  the  different  Halls,  some  time  before  the  Commencement 
1794-,  signed  by  the  Master  of  Trinity  College. 

X2 


324 

The  above  Oath  was  taken  and  subscribed  in  the 
presence  of  us,  this  first  of  May,  1780. 

L.  YATES,   Vice-Chancellor. 

[Sec.  ten  Persons  in  all.] 

Orig.  Registry,  L  —  83. 

The  Person  elected  subscribes  the  Declaration 
of  Conformity  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book,  takes 
the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and  the 
Vice-Chancellor  administers  to  him  the  Oath 
of  Office. 


Extracts  from  Mr.  Jackson's  Will  respecting 
the  Election. 

"  My  Will  is,  that  such  Reader,  or  Professor, 
be  chosen  by  the  Regent  Masters  of  Arts  only, 
of  the  University,  who  have  been  resident  there 
for  the  greater  part  of  the  year  previous  to  the 
day  of  Election  (excepting  only  such  Masters  of 
Arts  as  are  under  one  yfear's  standing,  who  may 
vote,  though  they  have  not  been  resident  for  that 
Term)  which  said  Regent  Masters,  on  notice  given 
them  by  the  said  Master,  Fellows,  and  Scholars 
[of  Trinity  College]  or  any  of  them,  of  this  my 
Devise,  shall  assemble  publickly,  on  some  day 
to  be  fixed  by  the  Master  of  Trinity  College, 
or  the  Vice-Master,  in  some  of  the  Public  Build- 
ings belonging  to  the  said  University,  or  in 
the  Hall  or  Chapel  of  Trinity  College,  or  the 


325 

open  Court  there,  and  within  one  month  after 
such  notice  given  to  them,  by  the  said  Master 
of  Trinity  College,  or  any  of  them,  by  fixing 
up  a  writing  on  the  School  doors,  the  doors 
of  St.  Mary's  Church,  the  door  of  the  Regent 
House,  or  any  of  them,  shall  by  Poll,  to  be  taken 
by  the  Proctors  for  the  time  being,  or  if  they 
or  either  of  them  be  absent,  then  by  the  two 
Junior  Regent  Masters  then  present,  neither  of 
whom  is  Candidate  for  the  Office  of  Lecturer, 
choose,  by  majority  of  votes  given  in  writing, 
under  the  hand  of  each  Voter,  to  the  Proctors 
or  Junior  Regents  aforesaid,  such  Person  as  they 
shall,  in  their  own  proper  judgements,  look  upon 
to  be  best  qualified  by  his  knowledge  in  Natural 
and  Experimental  Philosophy,  and  the  practical 
part  thereof,  and  of  Chemistry,  to  instruct  the 
Students  in  the  University  in  the  said  Science ; 
such  Lecturer  to  be  a  Member  of  Trinity  College 
(either  Fellow  or  not)  if  such  be  found  equally 
qualified  with  any  other  Candidate,  and  preference 
to  be  given,  cceteris  paribus,  to  a  Staffordshire, 
or  a  Warwickshire,  or  a  Derbyshire,  or  a  Cheshire 
Man :  which  Lecturer  being  so  chosen  by  a  ma- 
jority of  the  said  Regent  Masters  (and  in  case 
disputes  arise  about  the  majority,  then  the  same 
to  be  determined  by  the  Vice- Chancellor,  the 
Provost  of  King's  College,  and  the  Master  of 
Trinity  College,  or,  if  either  of  the  two  last  be 
Vice-Chancellor,  then  by  the  Master  of  St.  John's 
College,  so  as  to  make  up  three,  or  by  the  ma- 
jority of  such  three)  shall  within  twelve  calendar 
months,  &c." 


336 


Form  of  the  VOTE. 

Ego  A.B.  eligo  C.D.  in  Prqfessorem  ex 
Fundatione  Magistri  JacJcson. 

The  proceedings  are  the  same  as  at  the  Elec- 
tion of  a  Clerk  to  a  Living. 

The  votes  are  read  by  the  Senior  Proctor, 
and  the  Election  declared  in  the  usual  form. 

The  Person  elected  subscribes  the  Declaration 
of  Conformity  in  the  Vice-Chancellor's  Book,  takes 
the  Oaths  of  Allegiance  and  Supremacy,  and  the 
Vice-Chancellor  administers  to  him  the  Oath  of 
Office. 


@obmtng  Urotooor  of  tf>*  itato*  of  (£nglani>. 

The  Electors  are,  the  Archbishop  of  Canter- 
bury, the  Archbishop  of  York,  the  Master  of 
St.  John's,  and  the  Master  of  Clare  Hall. 

This  Professor  reads  every  year,  after  the 
division  of  the  Michaelmas  or  Lent  Term,  a 
course  of  Lectures  upon  the  Constitution  and 
Laws  of  England. 

Two  Persons,  from  each  College,  recommended 
by  the  Master  or  Tutors,  are  admitted  free  of 
expence. 


327 


Ooumtng  IJi'ofcssor  of  fttr&tcinr* 

The  Electors  are  the  same  as  to  the  preceding 
Professorship. 

The  Professor  gives  a  course  of  Elementary 
Lectures,  on  the  Theory  and  Practice  of  Physic, 
every  year  in  the  Michaelmas  Term. 


The  Trustees  and  Electors  under  Mr.  Hulse's 
Will  are,  the  Vice-Chancellor  for  the  time  being, 
the  Master  of  Trinity  College,  and  the  Master 
of  St.  John's  College.  If  the  Master  of  Trinity 
be  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Greek  Professor  supplies 
his  place.  The  Bishop  of  Ely  is  Visitor,  with 
power  to  determine,  in  reason  and  equity,  in  all 
disputes. 

Extract  from  Mr.  Hulse's  Will, 
dated  July  21,  1777- 

"  The  Person  to  be  elected  into  the  Office  of 
Christian  Advocate  (on  Christmas  day,  or  within 
seven  days  after,  for  a  term  not  exceeding  five  or 
six  years)  to  be  a  learned  and  ingenious  Person, 
of  the  degree  of  Master  of  Arts,  or  of  Bachelor 
or  Doctor  of  Divinity,  of  the  age  of  thirty  years, 
and  resident  in  the  University ;  who  is  to  compose 
yearly,  whilst  in  Office,  some  proper  and  judicious 
answer  or  answers  every  year,  to  all  such  new  and 
popular,  or  other  cavils  and  objections,  against 


328 

the   Christian   or  Revealed  Religion,   or  against 
the  Religion  of  Nature,  as  may,  in  the  opinion 
of  the  Trustees,  or  any  two  of  them,  seem  hest 
or  most  proper  to  deserve  or  require  an  answer, 
whether     the    same     be     Ancient     or     Modern 
Ohj  actions,  but  chiefly  such  as  be  most  Modern, 
and    especially    such    as    have    appeared    in   the 
English  Language  of  late  years  against  Christi- 
anity, and  which  may  not  seem  to  have  received 
a  full  and  sufficient  answer,   if  any   such   there 
shall  be  unto  the  year  preceding  his  Election; 
as  likewise  to  be  ready  to  satisfy  any  real  scruples 
or    objections,   in   a   private   way,    that   may    be 
brought  from  time  to  time  by  any  fair  and  candid 
Enquirer  against   the   same;    such   writer  to   be 
called    the    Christian    Advocate,    and    such    his 
written   answers    to    be    in    English,    and    only 
against   notorious   Infidels,    whether   Atheists   or 
Deists,    not   descending   to   any   particular   Con- 
troversies or  Sects  amongst  Christians  themselves, 
except   some   new   or   dangerous   error,   either   of 
Superstition   or   Enthusiasm,    as   of    Popery,    or 
Methodism,   either   in  opinion  or  practice,  -shall 
prevail.     In  which  case  only  it  may  be  necessary, 
for  that  time,  to  write  or  to  reason  against  the 
same;  and  such  treatise  or  treatises  to  be  every 
year  printed,   the  expence  whereof  shall   be  de- 
ducted out  of  the  temporary  stipend  or  salary; 
and  the  remainder  of  the  said  stipend  or  salary, 
or  rents  and  profits,  shall  be  paid  or  given  every 
year  to  the  several  Authors  successively  as  a  re- 
ward  for   the   same ;    but  if  the   Person    chosen 
into  the  said  Office  shall  neglect,  or  not  discharge 


329 

his  Office  as  he  ought  to  do,  he  is  to  forfeit  and 
lose  his  salary  for  that  year,  which  is,  in  such 
case,  to  be  equally  divided  between  the  Six 
Senior  Fellows  of  St.  John's  College." 


iucturrr,  or  Christian  IJrcattjrr. 

The  Election  to  this  Office  is  to  take  place 
on  Christmas  day,  or  within  eight  days  after. 

The  Trustees  and  Electors  are  the  same  as 
in  the  case  of  the  Christian  Advocate. 

The  Persons  eligible  are.  Masters  of  Arts  of 
the  University  of  Cambridge,  under  forty  years 
of  age. 

The  Office  is  only  annual,  but  the  same  In- 
dividual may,  under  certain  circumstances,  be 
re-elected  for  any  successive  number  of  years,  not 
exceeding  six. 

The  duty  of  the  Lecturer  is  to  preach  and 
print  twenty  Sermons  in  each  year,  ten  in  April, 
May,  and  the  former  part  of  June,  and  ten  in 
September,  October,  and  the  former  part  of  Xo- 
vernber. 

The  subject  of  the  discourses  is,  to  shew  the 
evidence  for  Revealed  Religion,  or  to  explain 
some  of  the  most  difficult  texts,  or  obscure  parts 
of  Scripture,  or  both. 

The  time  and  place  of  delivery  are  to  be  in 
Great  St.  Mary's  Church,  and  either  on  the 
Friday  mornings,  or  the  Sunday  afternoons,  of 
each  week  in  the  above-mentioned  period;  and 


330 

if  the  duties  be  not  discharged  by  the  Person 
appointed,  his  salary  is  divided  amongst  the  six 
Senior  Fellows  of  St.  John's  College. 

The  Preacher  is  not  afterwards  eligible  to  the 
Office  of  Christian  Advocate. 


<£xamtttatton  of  <£anm&att*  for  ftOrittrsljips  in 
of  tf)c  <£ast  lemma  Company. 


The  following  Letter,  addressed  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  from  the  Right  Honourable  CHARLES 
WILLIAMS  WYNN,  was  received  by  him  in  the 
Long  Vacation  of  1826. 

"  WHITEHALL  PLACE,  July  31,  1826. 
"  Sir, 

fe  Enclosed  I  have  the  honor  to  transmit  to 
you  a  Copy  of  the  Regulations  for  the  Examination  of 
Candidates  for  WRITER  SHI  PS  in  the  service  of  the 
EAST  INDIA  COMPANY,  which  have  been  prepared  by 
the  Court  of  Directors,  with  the  approbation  of  the 
Board  of  Commissioners  for  the  affairs  of  India. 

"  You  will  find  that  it  is  proposed  that  Two  Ex- 
aminers should  be  appointed  from  the  University  of 
Cambridge  by  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Regius  Pro- 
fessors, with  an  annual  stipend  of  £.SO,  one  of  them 
to  be  annually  replaced* 

I  have  the  honor  to  be 

with  the  highest  respect, 

Sir, 
Your  most  obedient  humble  Servant, 

CHARLES  WILLIAMS  WYNN." 

"  The  Rev.  the  Vice-chancellor, 
Cambridge. 


331 


PLAN  for  the  EXAMINATION  of  CANDIDATES 
for  admission  to  the  CIVIL    SERVICE,   who 
have  not  resided  at  the  College  of  Hailey- 
bury. 

"  The  Candidates  will  be  examined  in  the 
Greek  Testament,  and  in  some  of  the  works  of 
the  following  Greek  Authors,  viz.  Homer,  He- 
rodotus, Demosthenes,  or  in  the  Greek  Plays; 
also  in  some  of  the  Works  of  the  following  Latin 
Authors,  viz.  Livy,  Cicero,  Tacitus,  and  Juvenal, 
which  part  of  the  Examination  will  include  col- 
lateral reading  in  Ancient  History,  Geography, 
and  Philosophy. 

"  They  will  also  be  examined  in  Mathematics, 
including  the  four  first  and  sixth  Books  of  Euclid, 
Algebra,  Logarithms,  Plane  Trigonometry,  and 
Mechanics  — 

"  In  Modern  History,  principally  taken  from 
'  Russell's  Modern  Europe,'  and  in  ^Paley's  Evi- 
dences of  Christianity.' " 

TEMPLE  CHEVALLIER,  Caih.  Hall.  \          •  .  ? 
ALFRED  OLLIVANT,  Trin.  Coll.      )     ^ 


PROCEEDINGS    AT    THE    ELECTION. 

"CATHARINE  HALL  LODGE,  Oct.  30,  1826. 

<f  At  a  Meeting  holden  this  day  at  the  Lodge  of 
Catharine  Hall  in  the  University  of  Cambridge,  pur- 
suant to  a  notification  (dated  July  31,  1826.)  made  by 
the  Right  Honourable  CHARLES  WILLIAMS  WYNN, 


332 


President  of  the  Board  of  Controul,  for  the  Election 
of  two  Persons  to  examine  Candidates  for  Writerships 
in  the  Service  of  the  East  India  Company. 


PRESENT, 

The  Right  Worshipful  JOSEPH   PROCTER,  D.D.    Vice- 
Chancellor. 

The  Right  Reverend  JOHN  LORD  BISHOP  of  BRISTOL, 

Regius  Professor  of  Divinity. 

Dr.  HAVILAND,  Regius  Professor  of  Physic. 

The   Rev.  JAMES  SCHOLEFIELD,   M.A.   Regius  Pro- 
fessor of  Greek, 

being  the  major  part  of  the  Electors  named  in   the  said 
notification. 

The  Rev.   TEMPLE  CHEVALLIER,   M.A.   late  -Fellow 
of  Catharine  Hall,  and 

The  Rev.  ALFRED  OLLIVANT,  M.A.  Fellow  of  Trinity 
College, 

were,  by  the  said  Electors,  chosen  to  be  Examiners. 

J.  PROCTER,   Vice- Chancellor. 
J.  BRISTOL,  Regius  Professor  of  Divinity. 
J.  HAVILAND,  Regius  Professor  of  Physic. 
J.  SCHOLEFIELD,  Regius  Professor  of  Grt 


"  This  I  attest, 


W.  HUSTLER,  Reg.  and  Not.  Pub. 


Book  of  Elections ; 
Registry. 


N.B.  "  The  Election  to  be  officially  announced 
to  the  President  of  the  Board  of  Controul,  and  to  the 
Court  of  Directors." 


333 


Election  of  Horn  (ftrafcen'a 

The  Right  Honorable  JOHN  LORD  CRAVEN 
of  Riton,  by  his  last  Will  and  Testament  bearing 
date  the  28th  day  of  May  1647,  amongst  other 
things,  gave  and  bequeathed  unto  his  Executors 
in  his  said  Will  nominated  and  appointed,  all  his 
Lands  and  Hereditaments  in  Cancerne  in  the 
county  of  Sussex  (which  he  bought  of  Mr.  May- 
nard)  to  this  intent  and  purpose,  that  out  of 
the  yearly  profits  of  the  said  Lands,  Tenements 
and  Hereditaments  one  hundred  pounds  a  year 
be  raised  towards  the  maintenance  of  four  poor 
Scholars,  whereof  two  to  be  in  the  University 
of  Oxford,  and  two  in  the  University  of  Cam- 
bridge. The  Scholars,  who  are  to  have  the 
benefit  of  this  maintenance  in  Oxford,  to  be 
chosen  by  the  Vice-Chan cellor,  the  King's  Pro- 
fessors, and  the  Orator  there  for  the  time  being, 
or  the  greater  part  of  them.  And  so  likewise 
in  Cambridge,  by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the  King's 
Professors,  and  the.  Orator  there  for  the  time 
being,  or  the  greater  part  of  them.  Yet  willing 
that  if  any  of  his  name  or  kindred  shall  happen 
to  be  poor,  and  be  a  Scholar  in  either  University, 
that  he  shall  be  preferred  to  have  the  benefit 
of  this  maintenance  before  any  other  Scholar 
whatsoever ;  and  further  willing  thereby  that  the 
said  annuity  and  maintenance  shall  cease  and 
determine  to  any  such  Scholar  after  he  hath 
been  in  the  University  by  the  space  of  fourteen 
years,  and  likewise  that  it  shall  cease  and  de- 


334 

termine  to  any  such  Scholar  that  shall  attain 
to  any  preferment  of  a  double  value,  and  that 
then  the  said  annuity,  so  determining,  shall  be 
bestowed  upon  some  other  poor  Scholar;  as  by 
the  said  Will  doth  plainly  appear. 

Whenever  a  Vacancy  occurs,  any  Under- 
graduate may  offer  himself  a  Candidate,  by  signi- 
fying his  intention  in  a  Latin  letter  addressed 
to  each  of  the  Electors,  within  the  time  Jimited 
by  the  Programma  which  declares  the  Vacancy. 

The  Possessors  are  not  allowed  to  be  absent 
above  three  months  in  the  year,  without  the 
express  permission  of  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and 
the  major  part  of  the  Electors  then  resident  in 
the  University. 

By  a  late  Decree  of  the  Court  of  Chancery, 
the  income  of  the  Scholars  has  been  increased 
to  £50.  per  annum  each,  and  three  additional 
Scholarships  founded,  under  the  same  regulations 
as  the  preceding,  except  that  they  cannot  be  held 
for  more  than  seven  years. 


Or*  iSafttie'* 

WILLIAM  BATTIE,  Doctor  in  Physic  and 
Fellow  of  the  College  of  Physicians  in  London, 
in  consideration  of  his  having  formerly  enjoyed 
the  benefit  of  one  of  Lord  Craven's  Exhibitions, 
by  Deed  of  gift  dated  September  30,  1747,  and 
enrolled  in  Chancery,  November  7,  1747,  gave 
to  the  Chancellor,  Masters,  and  Scholars,  of  the 


335 

University  of  Cambridge,  and  their  Successors, 
for  ever,  a  Messuage  or  Tenement  in^  Hitcham 
in  the  County  of  Suffolk,  together  with  certain 
parcels  of  Land  lying  in  Hitcham.  and  in  Bretten- 
ham  in  the  said  County,  In  Trust  that  the  said 
Chancellor,  Masters  and  Scholars,  and  their  Suc- 
cessors, shall  pay  the  clear  yearly  profits  of  the 
said  Messuage  and  Lands,  by  two  half-yearly 
payments,  to  such  Scholar  of  the  said  University 
of  Cambridge,  as  the  said  William  Battie  shall 
during  his  life  from  time  to  time  direct  and 
appoint ;  and,  after  his  decease,  to  such  Scholar 
as  shall  be  elected  agreeably  to  the  rules  annexed 
to  the  said  Deed;  which  are 

I.  The  Vice-Chancellor,  or  his  Deputy,  the 
Provost  of  King's  College,  the  King's  Professors 
of    Law,    Physic,    and   Divinity,    and   the    two 
Proctors  for  the  time  being,  shall  be  the  Electors. 
And  in  case  the  Provost  of  King's  College  shall 
be  absent  from   the   University   at   the   time   of 
the  examination   of  the  Candidates,   or  disabled 
by   sickness,    or   otherwise,    from   attending    the 
same;    in   such   case,    the   Vice-Provost    of   the 
said  College,  or  if  he  is  absent  from  the  Univer- 
sity, or  disabled  by  sickness,  or  otherwise,  from 
attending  the  said  Examination,  the  Senior  Fel- 
low then  resident  in  College,  shall  have  a  right 
to   attend   the   said   Examination,   and    shall   be 
one   of  the   Electors,    in   the  room   of  the   said 
Provost. 

II.  The  Vice-Chancellor,  or  his  deputy,  upon 
every  Vacancy,  shall  summon  the  Electors  then 


336 

resident  in  the  University,  to  such  place  as  he 
shall  think  proper;  and  if  the  majority  of  the 
said  Electors  so  met  together,  shall  then  declare 
by  any  writing  under  their  hands,  that  the 
Scholarship  is  vacant,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  or 
his  Deputy,  shall  within  five  days  afterwards, 
cause  the  said  declaration  to  be  affixed  upon  the 
door  of  the  Schools,  or  other  public  place  be- 
longing to  the  said  University.  And  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  or  his  Deputy,  shall  likewise,  in  the 
same  instrument  concerning  the  said  declaration, 
appoint  a  time  and  place  for  the  Examination  of 
the  Candidates.  And  no  Examination,  or  Elec- 
tion, shall  be  proceeded  upon,  till  twenty-eight 
days  are  fully  complete  and  ended,  after  the 
affixing  the  said  declaration. 

III.  Every  Candidate  shall,  within  fourteen 
days  after  the  affixing  the  said  declaration,  visit 
each   of  the  Electors  then  resident   in  the  said 
"University,   and   shall  give   notice,    by   a   Latin 
Epistle,  to  such  Elector,  that  he  is  a  Candidate : 
and  in  case  he  neglects  visiting,  in  manner  afore- 
said, within  that  time,  he  shall  be  incapable  of 
being  elected. 

IV.  No  one  shall  be  capable  of  being  elected,- 
who  has  been  admitted  into  the  College  he  first 
belonged  to  above  three  years,  or  who  is  any  ways 
intitled  to  receive  any  benefit,  or  advantage,  from 
either  of  the  Exhibitions  'commonly  called  Lord 
Craven's  Exhibitions.     And  in  case  any  Person, 
after  his  being  elected  and  admitted  to  hold  and 
enjoy  this  Scholarship,  shall  be  admitted  to,   or 


337 


any  ways  entitled  to  hold  and  enjoy,  the  said 
Lord  Craven's  Exhibition,  his  right  to  this 
Scholarship  shall  thencefrom  absolutely  cease  and 
determine. 

V.  The   Electors   and   Candidates   shall    be 
present  together,  at  the  time  and  place  appointed 
in  the  said  declaration ;  and  the  said  Candidates 
shall  be   examined  before   one    another,    in   the 
presence  of  each  other,  by  such  of  the  Electors 
who   shall  then   be   present;   to   the   intent   the 
Candidates    may    be    witnesses    of   each    other's 
abilities,   and   that  all  partiality   may, ~  as   much 
as  possible,  be  prevented  in  the  Electors.     And 
no  Candidate   shall  be  capable   of  being  elected 
who  shall  not  have  been  so  examined;  nor  shall 
any  Elector  have  a  right  to  vote,  who  was  not 
present  at  the  said  Examination. 

VI.  A   competent   skill   in   the    Greek  and 
Latin  languages  shall  be  a  necessary  qualification. 
But   in  respect  to  the  difference  of  standing  of 
each  Candidate,  an  equitable  consideration  shall 
be  had   of  their    improvement   in   the   arts   and 
sciences. 

VII.  As  soon  as  the  Examination  is  ended, 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  or  his  Deputy,  shall  declare 
to  the  Electors  then  present,  the  time  and  place 
he  appoints  for  making  the  Election. 

VIII.  He  of  those  so  examined  who  shall 
be   chosen  by   a  majority   of  the   Electors   then 
present  at  the  time  and  place  before  appointed, 
and  who  were  present  at  the  said  Examination, 

V 


338 

shall  be  deemed  effectually  chosen.  And  in  case 
there  should  happen  an  equality  of  votes  for 
two  or  more  Candidates,  he  shall  be  deemed 
effectually  chosen  whom  the  Provost  of  King's 
College,  if  he  is  then  present,  and  was  present 
at  the  said  Examination,  shall  declare  for.  And 
in  case  the  said  Provost  is  not  then  present,  or 
was  not  present  at  the  said  Examination,  he  shall 
be  deemed  effectually  chosen  whom  the  Vice- 
Chan  cellor,  or  his  Deputy,  shall  declare  for. 

IX.  Every  Scholar,  during  the  time  of  his 
enjoying  this  Scholarship,  shall  reside  at  least 
nine  calendar  months  every  year  in  the  Uni- 
versity, except  he  is  a  Graduate  in  Physic,  or 
designs  to  profess  the  same,  and  produces,  once 
every  year,  if  required  by  any  of  the  Electors, 
a  Certificate  signed  by  one  Hospital  Physician  in 
London,  or  bills  of  mortality,  signifying  that 
the  said  Scholar  diligently  attends  the  said  Phy- 
sician in  visiting  the  patients  of  the  said  Hos- 
pital; in  which  case  my  intention  is  that  the 
residence  of  such  Scholar  in  the  University  shall 
be  hereby  absolutely  dispensed  with,  during  his 
attending  upon  the  said  Physician.  But  no  other 
Scholar  shall  be  absent  above  three  calendar 
months,  every  year,  from  the  University,  without 
leave  granted  to  him,  under  the  hand  of  the 
major  part  of  the  Electors  then  present  in 
the  University:  and  in  case  he  absents  him- 
self for  a  longer  time,  without  such  leave,  his 
right  to  this  Scholarship  shall  immediately  cease 
and  determine.  But  my  intention  and  desire  is, 


339 

that  the  Electors  shall  not  be  difficult  in  granting 
such  leave,  provided  it  be  not  longer  than  for 
one  year  at  once:  which  leave,  however,  may  be 
renewed  in  like  manner,  from  year  to  year,  in 
case  the  Scholar  can  satisfy  a  major  part  of  the 
Electors  then  present  in  the  University,  that  he 
is  prosecuting  his  studies  during  such  his  absence ; 
and  in  case  that  he  brings,  when  required  by  any 
of  the  Electors,  a  Certificate  of  his  good  behaviour, 
under  the  hands  of  three  or  more  neighbouring 
Clergymen  of  the  Church  of  England:  provided 
likewise  that  he  continues  a  Member  of  the  Uni- 
versity. 

X.  When  any  Scholar  shall  have  been  ad- 
mitted nine  years  into  the  College  to  which  he 
first  belonged,   or   shall  have   obtained  any   Ec- 
clesiastical Benefice  or  Preferment,   his  right  to 
enjoy  this   Scholarship  shall  then  cease   and  de- 
termine.    But  it  shall  and  may  be  lawful  never- 
theless  for   any   Scholar  to  hold  and  enjoy  this 
Scholarship  for  such  time  as  aforesaid,   notwith- 
standing such  Scholar  shall  after  such  Election 
and   Admission   to    the    same,    have   obtained   a 
Fellowship  in  some  one  College  of  the  University 
of  Cambridge. 

XI.  If  the  Provost  of  King's  College  shall 
happen  to  be  Vice-Chancellor  at  the  time  of  the 
said   Examination   and   Election ;    in    such   case 
the  Vice-Provost  of  King's  College,  or,  if  he  is 
absent,  or  otherwise  disabled  from  attending  the 
same,   the   Senior   Fellow    then   resident  in   the 
said  College,  shall  be  one  of  the  Electors ;    and 


340 

the  Vice-Chancellor,  if  there  should  happen  an 
equality  of  votes,  shall,  in  this  case,  have  a  casting 
vote. 

XII.  If  any  doubt  should  arise  after  my 
decease,  touching  the  intent  and  meaning  of  any 
of  the  aforesaid  Rules,  or  of  such  as  I  may  hereafter 
give,  which  I  reserve  to  myself  to  do,  the  same 
shall  be  interpreted  and  determined  by  the  Pro- 
vost of  King's  College;  and  his  determination 
shall  be  acquiesced  in  by  the  Electors  and  Scho- 
lars. 

W.  BATTIE. 
Copied  from  a  Book  in  the  Vice-Chancellors  possession. 


Sir  SBilUam  iSrottm*'* 


Sir  WILLIAM  BROWNE,  Knt.  M.D.  by  his 
last  Will  proved  April  12,  1774,  subjects  his 
estates,  in  divers  places,  to  a  perpetual  rent  charge 
of  twenty  guineas  a  year,  to  be  paid  yearly  from 
his  decease,  clear  of  taxes  and  disbursements,  to 
the  Chancellor,  Masters,  and  Scholars  of  the 
University  of  Cambridge,  and  their  Successors  ; 
In  Trust,  for  founding  a  Classic  Scholarship,  by 
electing  the  best  Classic  Scholar  who  shall  offer 
himself  for  his  Examination  within  a  year  from 
his  Matriculation;  public  notice  being  given,  by 
the  Vice-Chancellor,  a  month  before  such  Elec- 
tion. 


341 

The  Scholar  shall  enjoy  this  rent  charge,  with 
arrears  which  may  happen  by  vacancy,  for  seven 
years. 

He  shall  admit  himself  at  St.  Peter's  College, 
and  reside  there  every  entire  Term,  during  his 
Undergraduateship ;  behave  well,  studiously,  and 
religiously,  and  give  up  to  the  Fellows'  table, 
every  Sunday,  a  copy  of  Greek  and  Latin  verses. 
He  shall  go  to  Lectures  with  the  Mathematical 
Professor  for  three  years.  He  shall  regularly  and 
reputably  perform  all  his  College  and  University 
Exercises,  an  Act,  first,  second  and  third  Oppo- 
nencies,  in  the  Sophs'  Schools,  and  take  the 
degrees  of  Bachelor  and  Master  of  Arts. 

There  being  no  appointment  in  the  Will  of 
Examiners  for,  or  Electors  into,  this  Scholarship, 
a  Grace  passed  the  Senate  May  8,  1775,  that 
the  appointment  of  the  first  Scholar  should  be 
left  to  Sir  Martin  Folkes,  Bart.  Grandson  and 
Heir  to  Sir  William  Browne :  who  accordingly, 
by  letter  dated  May  16,  1775,  appointed  Thomas 
Veasey  to  such  Scholarship. 


RULES  for  the  Choice  of  a  SCHOLAR  on  the 
Foundation  of  Sir  WILLIAM  BROWNE,  Knt. 
Agreed  upon  by  the  SYNDICS  appointed  for 
that  purpose  by  a  Grace,  Apr.  10,  1782. 

I.  The  Vice-Chancellor  or  his  Deputy,  the 
King's    Professors    of    Divinity,    Law,     Physic, 
Hebrew,   and   Greek,  and  the  Public  Orator  of 
the  University,  all  for  the  time  being,  shall  be 
the  Electors  into  the  said  Scholarship. 

II.  The    Vice-Chancellor,    or    his   Deputy, 
within  ten  days   after  receiving    notice    of   any 
Vacancy  of  the  said  Scholarship,  shall  summon 
the  Electors  then  resident  in  the  University,  to 
such    place   as  he  shall   think   proper.     And  if 
the  majority  of  the  said  Electors  so  met  together 
shall  then   declare,   by   any  writing  under  their 
hands,  that  the  Scholarship  is  vacant,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  shall,  within  five  days  afterwards,  cause 
the  said  declaration  to  be  fixed  on  the  door  of 
the   Schools,   or  other  public  place  belonging  to 
the  said  University.     And  no  Election  shall  be 
proceeded  upon  till  twenty-eight  days   are   fully 
complete  and  ended,  after  the  affixing  of  the  said 
declaration.   Provided  only  that  if  the  said  Scholar- 
ship shall  become  void  during  the  long  Vacation,  no 
public  declaration  of  such  Vacancy  shall  be  af- 
fixed upon  the  door  of  the  Schools,  or  elsewhere, 
till  the  tenth  day  of  October  following,  nor  any 
Election   be  proceeded   upon   till   the  expiration 


343 

of  twenty-eight    days    from    the    said    tenth    of 
October. 

III.  Every  Person  who  intends  to  be  a  Can- 
didate   for    the   said    Scholarship,    shall,    within 
fourteen  days  after  the  affixing  of  the  said  de- 
claration, visit  each  of  the  Electors  then  resident 
in  the  University,  and  give  notice,  by  a  Latin 
Epistle,  to  such  Elector,  that  he  is  a  Candidate. 
And    in    case    he    neglects   visiting  within   the 
time,  and  in  the  manner  aforesaid,   he  shall  be 
incapable  of  being  elected  into  that  Vacancy. 

IV.  By  the  Will  of  the  Founder  «  any  Person 
shall  be  capable  of  being  elected,  who  shall  offer 
himself  for  examination  within  a  year  from  his 
Matriculation ;"  that  is,  any  Person  shall  be  ca- 
pable  of  being   elected,   who   offers    himself   for 
Examination   at   any  time  from   the  day   of  his 
Admission  into  any  College  in  either  University, 
till  the   expiration  of  one  whole  year   from   the 
first  public  Matriculation  that  shall  be  held  after 
his  first  coming  to  reside  in  such  College:  and 
evidence  of  his  being  matriculated,   as  likewise 
a  Certificate  of  the  time  of  his  Admission  and 
first  coming  to  reside,  under  the  hand  and  seal 
of  the  Master,  or  Locum-tenens,  of  his  College, 
shall  be  brought  by  each  Candidate  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  or  his  Deputy,  together  with  the  Latin 
Epistle  mentioned  in  the  preceding  rule. 

V.  The  examination  shall  be  confined  to  the 
Greek  and  Latin  Languages,  Composition,  An- 
cient History,  and  Ancient  Geography. 


344 


VI.  Within  five  days  after  the  expiration 
of  the  twenty-eight  days  limited  as  above  for  the 
public  notice  of  the  Vacancy,  the  Vice-Chancellor 
shall  again  summon  the  Electors  then  present  in 
the  University,  and,  together  with  them,  shall 
fix  upon  the  time  and  place  for  making  the 
Election :  at  which  time  the  Person  who  shall 
be  chosen  by  the  majority  of  the  Electors  then 
present,  shall  be  deemed  effectually  chosen:  pro- 
vided always,  that  at  every  Election,  there  be 
present,  at  least,  four  of  the  Electors:  and  that 
at  every  meeting  of  the  Electors,  whether  for 
the  purpose  of  declaring  the  Vacancy,  of  fixing 
the  time  of  the  Election,  or  of  electing  a  Scholar, 
in  case  of  an  equality  of  voices,  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, or  his  Deputy,  have  the  casting  vote. 

VII.  By  the  Will  of  the  Founder,  "  the 
Scholar  so  elected,  if  he  is  not  already  a  Member 
of  St.  Peter's,  is  to  admit  himself  immediately 
into  that  College,  and  to  enjoy  the  benefits  of 
his  Scholarship,  with  arrears  from  the  Vacancy, 
for  seven  years  from  the  day  of  his  election ;  on 
condition  that  he  reside  there  every  entire  Term 
during  his  Undergraduateship ;  that  he  behave 
himself  well,  studiously,  and  religiously,  and  give 
up  to  the  Fellows'  table,  every  Sunday,  a  copy 
of  Greek  and  Latin  verses;  that  he  go  to 
Lectures  with  the  Mathematical  Professor  for 
three  years;  that  he  regularly,  and  reputably 
perform  all  his  College  and  University  exercises, 
and  take  the  degrees  of  Bachelor  and  Master 
of  Arts:  and  proper  Certificates  of  his  having 


345 

complied  with  the  above  conditions  shall  be 
annually  brought  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  by  such 
Scholar,  before  he  shall  be  intitled  to  receive 
his  stipend." 

Copied  from  a  copy  in  a  Book  of  the  Vice-chancellor. 

An  Intimation,  signifying  the  Vacancy,  &c. 
is  affixed  to  the  door  of  the  Schools. 

At  the  time  of  Election,  the  Yeoman  Bedell 
maketh  Oath  concerning  the  affixing  of  the 
Intimation. 


DR.  JONATHAN  DAVIES,  late  Provost  of 
Eton  College,  by  his  last  Will  and  Testament, 
bearing  date  July  1804,  gave  and  bequeathed 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor  for  the  time  being,  and 
to  the  Provost  of  King's  College  in  the  University 
of  Cambridge,  In  Trust,  one  thousand  pounds 
in  the  three  per  cents,  to  form  a  Scholarship,  to 
be  called  "  Dr.  Davies's  University  Scholarship," 
on  the  same  footing  with  those  called  the  Craven 
University  Scholarships,  for  the  greatest  Pro- 
ficient in  Classical  learning,  the  Candidates  to 
be  the  same,  the  same  Examiners,  only  with  the 
addition  of  the  Provost  of  King's  College.  This 
he  did,  remembering  (as  he  further  states  in  his 
Will)  that  he  was  so  fortunate  as  to  get  one 
of  the  said  University  Scholarships,  and  as 
probably  the  consideration  of  his  circumstances 


346 

(recommended  by  the  Founder  or  Founders  of 
those  Scholarships)  weighed  greatly  in  his  favour, 
he  Willed  that  the  same  circumstance  be  at- 
tended to,  in  the  disposal  of  his  Scholarship,  by 
the  Examiners,  and  that  it  be  enjoyed  by  the 
Candidate,  on  whom  the  majority  of  the  Ex- 
aminers agree  to  bestow  it,  the  same  number  of 
years  as  the  above-mentioned  Craven  Scholarships. 


Or,  lfcU'0 


Extract  from  the  Reverend  DR.  BELL'S  Deed 
of  Foundation. 

DR.  BELL  has  transferred  £.15,200  stock 
3  per  cents.  Consols  to  the  University  of  Cam- 
bridge in  Trust,  to  found  eight  new  Scholarships. 

The  Scholars  to  be  the  Sons,  or  the  Orphans 
of  those  Clergymen  of  the  Church  of  England, 
whose  circumstances  and  situations  are  altogether 
such,  as  not  to  enable  them  to  bear  the  whole 
expence  of  sending  their  Sons  to  this  University. 

The  first  Election  shall  take  place  between 
the  12th  of  November,  and  the  25th  of  December 
1810:  when  there  shall  be  elected  two  Scholars 
of  the  third  year  of  standing,  that  is,  who  were 
admitted  between  the  Commencements  of  1807 
and  1808. 

Profits  to  commence  from  July  6,  1810,  and 
to  be  continued  for  two  years. 


347 

At  the  same  time  shall  be  elected  two  other 
Scholars  of  the  second  year,  viz.  who  were  ad- 
mitted between  the  Commencements  of  1808, 
and  1809-  Profits  to  continue  for  three  years. 

The  second  Election  will  be  on  Friday  after 
Midlent  Sunday  1811,  of  two  Scholars  of  the  first 
year.  Profits  to  continue  for  four  years. 

The  third  Election  will  be  on  Friday  after 
Midlent  Sunday  1812,  of  two  Scholars  of  the  first 
year.  Profits  to  continue  for  four  years. 

The  fourth  Election  will  be  on  the  Friday 
after  Midlent  Sunday  1813,  of  two  other  Scholars 
of  the  first  year,  to  succeed  those  two  of  the  third 
year,  who  were  two  of  the  four  first  chosen, 
and  so  on  for  ever.  The  profits  to  continue  for 
four  years,  and  no  more. 

Every  Scholar  to  take  the  degree  of  B.A.  in 
the  most  regular  manner. 

No  Scholar  to  be  elected  from  King's  College, 
or  from  Trinity  Hall. 

The  Electors  are, 

The  VICE-CHANCELLOR. 
The  REGIUS  PROFESSOR   OF  DIVINITY. 
The  REGIUS  PROFESSOR  OF  CIVIL  LAW. 
The  LUCASIAN  PROFESSOR  OF  MATHEMATICS, 
The  PUBLIC  ORATOR. 


348 


RULES  for   the    FOUNDATION    of   the   PITT 
SCHOLARSHIP,    and  for    the  ELECTION  of 
the  SCHOLAR,   as  proposed  by  the  Syndics 
appointed  by   the    University  for   that  pur- 
pose. 

I.  The  sum  of  one  thousand  pounds,  given 
by  the  Subscribers  to  Mr.  Pitt's  Statue,  for  the 
purpose  of  founding  "  the  Pitt  Scholarship,"  and 
which  has  since  been  augmented  by  a  donation 
of  five  hundred  pounds  from  the  "Pitt  Club"  in 
London,   shall  be  placed  in  the   Public  Funds, 
until  the  Syndics  shall  be  able  to  vest  it  in  Land ; 
and  the  clear  annual  income  arising  from  it  shall 
be  paid  to  the  Pitt  Scholar. 

II.  The  Vice-Chancellor  or  his  Deputy,  the 
Public   Orator,    the   Greek   Professor,    and    two 
Members    of    the    Senate,    to    be    appointed   by 
the   different   Colleges,   in  their  turns,   shall  be 
the  Electors.     Two   Colleges,    according   to   the 
Cycle  of  Proctors,    commencing  with    the    year 
1817,    shall    respectively    nominate   an    Elector. 
But  if  the  Vice-Chancellor,   the  Public   Orator, 
and  the  Greek  Professor,   or  any  two   of  them, 
be  Members  of  the  same  College,  no  Elector,  in 
that  case,  shall  be  appointed  by  the  College  ac- 
cording to  the  Cycle  of  Proctors,  but  the  appoint- 
ment shall  be  made  by  the  University.     Or,  if 
the  Public  Orator,  or  the  Greek  Professor,  shall 


349 

be  prevented  by  illness,  or  otherwise,  from  attend- 
ing the  Examination,  or  if  the  Colleges  shall 
have  neglected  to  signify  to  the  Vice-Chan cellor 
the  appointment  of  the  Electors  according  to  their 
respective  turns,  then  Deputies  shall  be  appointed 
by  Grace. 

III.  The  first  Examination  shall  commence 
on  Monday,  January  17,  1814;    and  the  Vice- 
Chancellor   or  his   Deputy,   the   Public    Orator, 
and  the  Greek  Professor,  shall,  in  future,  on  or 
before  the  first  day    of   December    after    every 
Vacancy,    cause   a    writing    under    their    hands, 
declaring   the   said   Vacancy,    and    the    time    of 
Examination,   to  be   affixed  to   the  door  of  the 
Public  Schools ;  and  they  shall  notify  the  same 
to  the  two  Colleges,  which  are  to  nominate  the 
Electors;    and  the  Heads  of  those  Colleges,   or 
their  Deputies,  shall,  within  one  week  after  such 
notices,  signify  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  the  names 
of  the  Electors  so  appointed. 

IV.  The  Examination,  which  shall  be  solely 
Classical,    shall    always    take    place   during    the 
week  of  the  Public  Examinations  in  the  Senate- 
House,  previous  to  the  Bachelors'  Commencement ; 
and  the  Scholar  elected  shall  receive  all  the  Di- 
vidends  or  Rents   that    shall   have  become   due 
subsequent  to  the  last  Vacancy. 

V.  Any  Undergraduate,  of  whatever  Rank, 
may  be  a  Candidate  for  the  " Pitt  Scholarship" 
provided  he   be  not   of  more   than   three    years 
standing,   from  the   time  of  his   first   residence; 


350 


but  he  shall,  on  or  before  the  31st  day  of  De- 
cember preceding  the  Examination,  signify  in  a 
Latin  Epistle,  to  each  of  the  Electors,  his  in- 
tention of  becoming  a  Candidate,  and  in  case  he 
shall  omit  sending  such  an  Epistle,  he  shall  be 
considered  as  incapable  of  being  elected  at  that 
time. 

VI.  The  "Pitt  Scholar"  shall  not  hold  any 
other  University  Scholarship. 

VII.  Every  Scholar  shall,  during  the  time 
of  his  holding  this  Scholarship,  reside  the  major 
part  of  every  Term,   and  if  he   shall  not  have 
kept  such  residence,  he  shall  vacate  his  Scholar- 
ship, unless  he  has  been  prevented  by  illness,  or 
any  other  cause,  which  shall  be  approved  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor,     the    Public    Orator,    and    the 
Greek  Professor. 

VIII.  Every  Scholar,  who  shall  obtain  any 
Ecclesiastical  Benefice  or  Preferment,  or  shall  be 
of   Master   of    Arts   standing,    shall    vacate   his 
Scholarship.     Confirmed  by  the  Senate,   Dec.  9, 
1813. 


The  Rev.  ROBERT  TYRWHITT,  M.A.  late 
Fellow  of  Jesus  College,  who  died  in  1817,  by 
his  Will  bequeathed  ,£4000.  Navy  5  per  cents,  for 
the  promotion  and  encouragement  of  Hebrew 
learning ;  the  mode  and  disposition  of  this  bequest 
to  be  left  to  the  University. 


351 


The  Senate  in  1818  decreed  the  foundation 
of  three  Scholarships ;  which  decree  was  revised 
in  1826,  and  the  number  increased  to  six,  subject 
to  the  following  Regulations: 

Decree  of  the  Senate,  May  14,  1826. 

1. — That  there  shall  in  future  be  six  Scholar- 
ships, called  Tyrwhitt's  Hebrew  Scholarships. 

2. — That  the  Candidates  for  these  Scholarships 
shall  be  Bachelors  of  Arts,  who  are  not  of  sufficient 
standing  to  be  created  Masters  of  Arts,  and  Stu- 
dents in  Civil  Law  or  Medicine  of  not  less  than 
four  or  more  than  seven  years  standing,  who  shall 
be  required,  before  they  are  admitted  to  become 
Candidates,  to  produce  certificates  from  their  re- 
spective Professors,  that  they  have  kept  the 
exercises  necessary  for  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Law  or  Physic. 

3. — That  out  of  the  net  annual  proceeds  of 
Mr.  Tyrwhitt's  Benefaction,  the  sum  of  ^150. 
be  divided  among  the  six  Scholars  in  the  pro- 
portions herein  after  specified. 

4. — That  the  Electors  to  these  Scholarships 
shall  be  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Regius  Pro- 
fessor of  Hebrew,  the  Professor  of  Arabic,  and 
two  Members  of  the  Senate,  to  be  nominated 
by  the  different  Colleges,  according  to  the  Cycle 
of  Proctors. 

5. — That  if  the  Regius  Professor  of  Hebrew, 
or  the  Professor  of  Arabic,  or  both  of  them,  shall 


352 


decline,  or  be  prevented  from  examining,  a  Deputy 
or  Deputies  shall  be  appointed  by  Grace  of  the 
Senate. 

6. — That  if  it  shall  happen  at  any  time, 
that  two  of  the  Offices  severally  constituting 
Electors  are  united  in  the  same  Person,  the 
Deputy  for  the  Elector  in  respect  of  one  of  the 
said  Offices  shall  be  the  Lord  Almoner's  Reader 
in  Arabic ;  but  if  in  any  case  the  Lord  Almoner's 
Reader  shall  decline  the  office  of  Deputy  Ex- 
aminer, or  shall  be  prevented  from  undertaking 
the  said  office,  a  Deputy  Examiner  shall  be  ap- 
pointed in  his  place  by  Grace  of  the  Senate. 

7. — That  if  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Regius 
Professor  of  Hebrew,  the  Professor  of  Arabic, 
or  any  two  of  them  shall  be  Members  of  the  same 
College,  no  Elector  shall  in  that  case  be  ap- 
pointed by  that  College  according  to  the  Cycle 
of  Proctors;  but  the  appointment  shall  be  made 
by  Grace  of  the  Senate. 

8. — That  the  appointment,  when  requisite, 
of  an  Examiner  or  Examiners  by  Grace  of  the 
Senate  take  place  at  the  first  Congregation  in 
the  Lent  Term  of  the  year,  and  that  the  Examiner 
or  Examiners  so  appointed  continue  in  office  until 
the  first  day  of  January  in  the  following  year. 

9. — That  two  Scholars  be  elected  annually, 
and  be  called  Scholars  of  the  first  and  second 
Classes;  that  a  Scholar  of  the  first  Class  receive 
an  annual  stipend  of  £30.,  and  a  Scholar  of  the 
second  Class  an  annual  stipend  of  £20.  for  three 


353 

years  from  the  time  of  Election:  and  that  the 
first  Election  under  these  Regulations  take  place 
in  May  1826,  the  second  in  May  1827. 

10. — That  should  it  appear  in  any  case  to 
the  majority  -of  the  Electors  that  no  one  of  the 
Candidates  is  deserving  of  a  Scholarship  of  the 
first  Class,  it  shall  be  competent  for  them  to 
elect  one  of  the  second  Class  only. 

11. — That,  in  the  event  of  one  Scholar  only 
being  elected,  the  Examiners  be  empowered  at 
the  Election  of  the  following  year,  to  elect  three 
Scholars  upon  this  foundation:  viz.  two  of  the 
first  Class,  and  one  of  the  second :  that  the  first 
in  the  order  of  merit  be  the  Scholar  of  the  first 
Class  for  that  year;  the  second  in  the  order  of 
merit  supply  the  vacancy  left  at  the  preceding 
Election,  and  be  entitled  to  all  the  emoluments 
assigned  to  that  Scholarship:  viz.  the  stipend 
of  the  preceding  year,  and  also  the  regular  stipends 
of  the  two  succeeding  years,  during  which,  and 
no  longer,  he  shall  remain  upon  this  foundation : 
and  that  the  third  be  the  Scholar  of  the  second 
Class  for  that  year. 

12. — That  if  any  Scholarship,  reserved  under 
the  powers  of  the  tenth  Regulation,  be  not  filled 
up  at  the  Examination  of  the  following  year, 
the  whole  proceeds  of  such  Scholarship  shall  be 
appropriated  in  the  manner  hereinafter  mentioned. 

13. — That  the  residue  of  the  net  annual 
proceeds  of  Mr.  Tyrwhitt's  Benefaction,  not 
already  disposed  of  by  the  third  of  these  Reso- 

Z 


354 


lutiohs,  together  with  all  accumulations  which 
may  arise  under  the  tenth  and  twelfth  Resolutions, 
form  a  fund  to  be  employed  in  the  following 
manner:  viz.  That  a  premium  of  not  less  than 
£50.  he  given,  as  often  as  this  fund  will  allow, 
for  such  a  Latin  Dissertation,  upon  some  subject 
connected  with  Hebrew  Literature,  as  may  be 
agreed  upon  by  the  Electors  or  the  majority 
of  them. 

14. — That  the  subject  of  such  Dissertation  be 
published  on  or  before  the  first  day  of  February, 
and  that  the  Dissertations  be  sent  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  in  the  usual  manner,  on  or  before  the 
first  day  of  December  in  the  same  year. 

15. — That  any  Member  of  this  University, 
who  has  taken  his  first  degree,  may  be  a  Candidate 
for  the  above  premium. 

16. — That  the  Examiners,  if  they  think  it 
expedient,  be  empowered  to  print  any  Prize  Dis- 
sertation at  the  expence  of  this  fund;  and  that 
all  Prize  Dissertations  not  printed  under  their 
direction,  be  deposited  in  the  Public  Library. 

17. — That  the  foregoing  Regulations  continue 
in  force  until  the  first  day  of  January  1830. 


355 


RESOLUTIONS    of  the   Sydicate  respecting  the 
UNIVERSITY  SCHOLARSHIPS. 

[Confirmed  by  a  Grace  of  the  SENATE.] 

It  appears  clearly  desirable  to  produce  a  re- 
gularity in  the  Vacancies  of  the  University 
Scholarships,  and  in  the  Elections,  so  that  one 
of  the  five  may  be  vacant  in  each  year,  and  not 
more;  also  that  the  Elections  may  be  about 
the  same  period  in  each  year. 

On  examining  the  constitutions  of  the  Craven, 
Battie,  Davies,  and  Pitt  Scholarships,  it  appears 
that  the  only  one  over  which  the  University 
cannot  assume  a  control  with  regard  to  the 
Vacancies  and  Elections,  is  the  Battie's  Scholar- 
ship. 

The  Pitt  Scholarship  having  been  recently 
fixed  by  a  Syndicate  appointed  for  that  purpose, 
the  most  proper  plan  appears  to  be,  to  assimilate 
the  new  Regulations  for  the  Craven  and  Davies's 
Scholarships,  to  these  adopted  for  the  Pitt  Scholar- 
ship. 

NEW     REGULATIONS. 

On  the  last  Saturday  in  November  in  every 
year,  there  shall  be  a  meeting  at  the  Vice- 
Chancellor's  of  the  Electors  to  the  Craven  and 
Davies's  Scholarships,  and  of  the  permanent 


356 

Electors  to  the  Pitt  Scholarship,  to  consider  whe- 
ther any  one  and  which  of  those  Scholarships 
shall  be  then  declared  Vacant ;  and  the  Examina- 
tion for  such  Vacant  Scholarship  shall  commence 
in  the  last  week  of  January  following. 

At  this  meeting,  of  the  Scholarships  which 
shall  have  become  voidable  by  non-residence,  that 
shall  be  declared  vacant,  which  has  been  held 
for  the  longest  time;  provided  that  no  one 
Scholarship  shall  have  become  necessarily  void 
before  the  day  of  this  meeting,  in  which  case  no 
other  shall  be  declared  vacant  for  that  year. 

When  it  is  decided  at  this  meeting  which 
of  the  Scholarships  is  to  be  declared  Vacant; 
the  rules  pointed  out  by  the  Founder  for  Notice, 
Examination,  and  Election  (where  any  such  rules 
are  particularly  prescribed  by  the  Founder)  will 
be  pursued,  so  as  to  bring  on  the  Examination  in 
the  last  week  of  January.  Where  no  such  Re- 
gulations have  been  prescribed  by  the  Founder,  the 
notice  of  the  Vacancy  is  to  be  affixed  to  the  door 
of  the  Public  Schools,  on  or  before  the  1st  of 
December;  and  the  Candidates  are  to  deliver 
their  Latin  Epistles  to  each  of  the  Examiners, 
on  or  before  the  31st  of  December,  as  in  the 
case  of  the  Pitt  Scholarship ;  and  all  prior  Regu- 
lations made  by  the  University,  inconsistent  with 
these,  are  hereby  repealed. 

With  respect  to  non-residence,  it  is  to  be' 
understood  that  the  holders  of  the  Craven,  Davies, 
and  Pitt  Scholarships  shall,  generally  speaking, 


357 

have  such  leave  of  absence,  as  will  enable  them 
to  retain  their  Scholarships  until  the  holder 
becomes  Senior  Scholar,  according  to  the  above 
Regulations. 

But  in  case  of  any  instance  of  non-residence 
in  the  University,  for  one  whole  Term,  before 
the  Bachelor's  degree,  the  Electors,  at  their 
meeting,  shall  have  the  power  of  declaring  vacant 
the  Scholarship  of  the  Person  so  non-resident 
in  preference  to  that  of  the  Senior  Scholar:  if 
it  appear  to  them  that  such  non-residence  is 
without  sufficient  excuse. 


Two  Gold  Medals,  value  fifteen  Guineas  each, 
are  given  annually  by  His  ROYAL  HIGHNESS 
the  CHANCELLOR  of  the  UNIVERSITY,  to  two 
commencing  Bachelors  of  Arts,  who,  having  their 
names  on  the  first  Tripos,  shew  themselves  the 
greatest  Proficients  in  Classical  learning.  On  the 
day  after  the  first  Tripos  day,  the  Candidates  for 
these  Medals  send  in  their  names  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  who  appoints  an  early  day  for  the 
Examination,  of  which  notice  is  given  to  the 
several  Candidates.  The  successful  Candidates 
declaim  in  the  Law  Schools,  on  the  second  Tripos 
day,  on  a  subject  given  them  by  the  Vice- 
Chancellor. 

These  Prizes  were  originally  established  in 
1751,  by  his  Grace  THOMAS  HOLLES,  Duke 


358 

of  Newcastle,  and  have  been  continued  by  the 
succeeding  Chancellors. 

His  Royal  Highness  the  Chancellor  of  the 
University  also  gives,  annually,  a  third  Gold 
Medal,  for  the  encouragement  of  English  Poetry, 
to  a  resident  Undergraduate,  who  shall  compose 
the  best  Ode,  or  the  best  Poem  in  Heroic 
Verse. 

The  Subject  is  to  be  given  out  on  the  25th 
of  October,  and  the  Exercises  are  to  be  delivered 
in  to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  on  or  before  the  26th  of 
March  following. 

Each  Candidate  is  to  send  his  Exercise 
privately,  and  without  a  name,  and  not  written 
in  his  own  hand,  but  revised  and  pointed  by 
himself,  with  some  Latin  verse  written  upon  it, 
and  at  the  same  time  he  is  to  send  his  own 
name  in  a  paper,  folded  up  and  sealed,  with 
the  same  Latin  Verse  on  the  outside;  and  the 
papers  containing  the  names  of  those  Persons, 
who  shall  not  succeed,  are  to  be  destroyed  un- 
opened* 

The  following  Persons  are  appointed  by  His 
Royal  Highness  to  determine  the  Prizes  for  the 
Chancellor's  three  Medals. 

1.  The  Vice-Chancellor. 

2.  The  Master  of  Trinity. 

3.  The  Master  of  St.  John's. 

4.  The  Provost  of  King's. 


359 

5.  The  Master  of  St.  Peters. 

6.  The  Master  of  Clare  Hall. 

7.  The  Master  of  Chrisfs. 

8.  The  Senior  resident  Fellow  of  Trinity, 

who  has  gained  a  Medal. 

9-     The  Public  Orator. 

10.  The  Greek  Professor. 

11.  The  Professor  of  Modern  History. 

N.B.  If  the  Senior  resident  Medallist  of 
Trinity  should  decline  to  examine,  then  the  Right 
shall  devolve  to  the  next  in  standing  who  has 
gained  a  Medal,  and  so  down. 

It  is  His  Royal  Highness's  wish,  that  the 
Puhlic  Orator,  the  Greek  Professor,  and  the 
Professor  of  Modern  History,  would  take  such 
active  part  in  the  Examination,  as  might  be 
agreed  upon  between  them  and  the  other  Ex- 
aminers ;  leaving  it  at  the  same  time  open  to  each 
and  all  of  them  to  make  such  further  enquiries, 
individually  or  'collectively,  as  they  might  think 
proper,  into  the  attainments  of  the  several  Can- 
didates. 

Notice  is  always  to  be  sent  to  the  Chancellor, 
immediately  upon  any  decision  of  the  Medals, 
informing  His  Royal  Highness  of  the  names  of 
the  successful  Candidates. 

Nov.  21,  1826.  No  Exercise  is  in  future  to 
exceed  200  lines  in  length. 


360 


ENGLISH    PRIZES. 

1  813.  ...  Columbus  .......  George  Waddington,  Trin.  Coll. 

1814....Boadicea  .........  William  Whewell,  Trin.  Coll 

1815.  .  .  .  Wallace  ..........  Edward  Smirke,  St.  John's  Coll. 

1816..  .  .Mahomet  .......  H.  S.  Beresford,  Clare  Hall. 

1817.  ...  Jerusalem  .......  C.  H.  Townshend,  Trin.  Hall. 

1818  ----  Imperial  and  Papal  Rome  .....  C.  E.  Long,  Trin.  Coll. 

1819-..  -Pompeii....  .....  .T.  B.  Macaulay,  Trin.  Coll. 

1820.  .  .  Waterloo  ......  .  .  G.  E.  Scott,  Trin.  Hall. 

1  82  1  ....  Evening  .........  T.  B.  Macaulay,  Trin.  Coll. 

1  822.  .  .  .  Palmyra  .........  J.  H.  Bright,  St.  John's. 

1823.  .  .  .  Australasia.  ......  W.  M.  Praed,  Trin.  Coll 

1824..  .  .Athens  .........  W.  M.  Praed,  Trin.  Coll 

1825.  .  .  .  Sculpture  .......  E.  G.  L.  Bulwer,  Trin.  Hall. 

1826.  .  .  .Venice  .........  J.  S.  Brockhurst,  St.  John's. 

1827.  .  .  .  Druids  .....  .  .  .  .  C.  Wordsworth,  Trin.  Coll 


The  Representatives  in  Parliament  of  this 
University  give  four  annual  prizes  of  fifteen 
guineas  each,  which  are  adjudged  by  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  Heads  of  Colleges,  to  two  Senior 
and  two  Middle  Bachelors  of  Arst,  who  shall 
compose  the  best  Dissertations  in  Latin  prose, 
which  are  read  publicly  by  them  in  the  Senate- 
House  on  a  day  appointed  near  to  the  Commence- 
ment, and  afterwards  sent  by  them  to  the  aforesaid 
Members. 

The  subjects  are  delivered  out  in  February,  and 
each  Candidate  is  to  send  his  Exercise  privately, 
without  his  name,  and  (if  he  chooses)  transcribed 
by  another  Person,  but  revised  and  pointed  by 


361 

himself,  to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  on  or  previous 
to  the  30th  of  April,  with  some  Latin  verse 
written  upon  it;  and  he  is  at  the  same  time 
to  send  a  paper  sealed  up,  with  the  same  Latin 
verse  on  the  outside,  which  paper  shall  inclose 
another  paper,  folded  up,  with  the  Candidate's 
name  written  within.  The  papers  containing  the 
names  of  those  Candidates  who  do  not  succeed, 
are  destroyed  unopened.  These  prizes  were  esta- 
blished hy  the  Hon.  Edward  Finch  and  the  Hon. 
Thomas  Townshend  in  1752,  and  have  been  con- 
tinued by  the  succeeding  Members. 

In  December  1826,  these  prizes  were  modified ; 
and  in  future  Two  will  be  opened  to  all  Bachelors 
of  Arts  without  distinction  of  years,  who  are 
not  of  sufficient  standing  to  take  the  degree 
of  M.A. ; — and  the  other  Two  will  be  open  to 
all  Undergraduates  who  shall  have  resided  not 
less  than  seven  Terms  at  the  time  when  the 
Exercises  are  to  be  sent  in. 


MEMBERS'    PRIZES. 

1753. 

SENIOR  BACHELORS.  —  Exaraen  vitas  et  philosophise  M.  Bruti, 
praecipue  habit&  ratione  carminum  quae  moriturus  recitavit  : 
17  T\r]fjiov  apery,  \oyos  ap    qatf"  ejw  Se  <re 
'Q<?  epyov  rja-Kow'   <rv  8'  ap    cSouAeue?  TU^J/. 
J.  Warren,  Caius.— /.  Cott,  Corpus. 

MIDDLE  BACHELORS.  —  Quod  Ratio  docet,  idem  testatur 
Historia,  ( veram  Gloriam  nisi  ope  Virtutis  comparari 
non  posse/ 

Rich.  Warren,  Jesus.- T.  Holme,  St.  John's. 


362 


1754. 

S.  B.— Athenis  et  Roma  inter  se  collatis,  exquirendum  est, 
Quodnam  adjumenti  singulae  artes  acceperint  ex  ipsis 
imperil  formis  in  iis  urbibus  constitutis. 

J.  Symonds,  St.  John's. Rich.  Warren,  Jesus. 

M.  B.—- Enarratio,  et  comparatio,  doctrinanun  moralium 
Epicuri  et  Stoicorum. 

/.  Foster,  King's. W.  Craven,  St.  John's. 

1755. 

S.  B Utriim  Veteris  Comoedise  apud  Athenienses  licentia 

magis    ad    emendandos    mores,    an    corrumpendos,    con- 
tulerit  ?       W.  Bell,  Magdalene. J.  Hallam,  King's. 

M.  B. — Utrum  Leges  Solonis  an  Lycurgi  magis  tarn  ad 
singulorum  virtutem,  quam  ad  Reipublicae  honorem  et 
emolumentum,  contulerint  ? 

H.  Elmsall,  S*.  John's. S.  Hallifax,  Jesus. 

1756. 

S.  B. — Quidnam  adjumenti  ab  institutis  Christianis  Mortales 
Ethnicorum  Doctrinse  acceperint? 

S.  Halifax,  Jesus. H.  Elmsall,  St.  John's. 

M.  B. — Quousque  Romanorum  depravati  mores  ad  labefac- 
tandam  et  evertendam  Rempublicam  valuerint? 

EasfApthorp,  Jesus. W.  Lobb,  St.  Peter's. 

1757. 

S.  B. — Utrum  liceat  Civi  bono,  Republica  in  partes  divisa, 
neutris  se  adjungere? 

W.  Lobb,  St.  Peter's. East  Apthorp,  Jesus. 

M.  B. — Utrum  Historias  legentibus  emendentur  magis,  an 
corrumpantur,  Mores? 

E.  Blakervay,  Magd T.  Didsbury,  St.  Peter's. 


363 


1758. 

$•  I?.—- Utrum  summa  hominum  felicitas,  juxta  Epicurum,  in 
Sensuum  delectationibus  praecipue  ponatur? 

/.  Cullum,  Cath. W.  Gordon,  Queen's. 

M.  B. — Utrum  diversarum  gentium  mores  et  instituta  a 
diverse  earum  Situ  explicari  possint? 

W.  Roberts,  King's. /.  Jebb,  St.  Peter's. 

1759. 

• 

S  5.— Pro  Socrate,  ad  populum  Atheniensem,  Oratio. 
C.  Marsh,  Trinity. W.  Roberts,  King's. 

M.  B — Utrum  in  bene  constitutam  civitatem  Ludi  Scenici 
admitti  debeant? 

Edw.  Tew,  King's. R.  Beadon,  St.  John's. 

1760. 

S.  B. — Qualis  fuerit  in  Academia  Veteri  et  Nova  philoso- 
phandi  ratio,  et  quaenam  sit  ad  verum  exquirendum 
accommodatior  ? 

R.  Beadon,  St.  John's. Walt.  Kerrich,  Cath. 

M.  B.— Utrum,  qud  auctior  sit  hominum  Eruditio,  eo  magis 
corrumpantur  mores? 

/.  Cowper,  Corpus.— Sam.  Berdmore,  Jesus. 


1761. 

S.  B. — Utrum  sit  praestantius  nova  invenire,  an  inventis  cultum 
addere  et  ornatum  ? 

H.  Bates,  St.  Peter's. Peter  Foster,  Jesus. 

M.  B.—  Utrum  boni  plus,  an  mali,  reportent  fere  qui  pere- 
grinantur  adolescentuli  ? 

/.  Norris,  Cams.— 'Ambrose  Eyre,  St.  Peter's. 


364 


1762. 

S.  #.— Num  credibile  videatur    populum    Romanum  magis 
sub  Pompeio,  quam  sub  Caesare,  Victore  fore  liberum? 
Phil.  Eosenhagen,  St.  John's. Amb.  Eyre,  St.  Peter's. 

jlf.  J5. Utrum  Virtus  magis  emineat  in  rebus  secundis,  an  in 

adversis  ?     E.  Maddison,  St.  Peter's. T.  Zouch,  Trinity. 

1763. 

S.  B. — Utrum  institutio  Civilis  Societatis  ad  humani  generis 
felicitatem  contulerit  ? 

T.  Zouch,  Trinity. E.  Maddison,  St.  Peter's. 

M.  B. — rQuaenam  commoda  Reipublicae  ex  artium  liberalium 
cultura  proveniant  ? 

H.  Whitfield,  Pemb. T.  Wagstaff,  Christ 

1764. 
S.  B. — Examen  Philosophise  M.  T.  Ciceronis. 

J.  Pemberton,  Pembroke. W.  Wyat,  Pemb. 

M.  B. — Quibus   Modis    institui  debeat  ad    exteras    regiones 
Peregrinatio  ? 
E.  Chamberlayne,  King's. A.  Warner  Byam,  St.  Peter's. 

1765. 

S.  B. — Utrum    civitati  perniciosior  sit  Epicuri,   an  Zenonis, 
Philosophia?     W.  Paky,  Chr E.  Chamberlayne,  King's. 

M.  B. — Quomodo    intelligendum   sit    efiatum    illud,    '  Rect^ 
fit  quodcunque  evernV? 

C.  Moore,  Trinity. James  Lambert,  Trinity. 

1766. 

S.  B.— Quomodo  vera  Historia  a  falsa  distingui  possit? 
W.  C.  Vnwin,  Christ.— C.  Moore,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Post  mortem  Julii  Caesaris,  a  quibusnam  stare  partibus 
civem  Romanum  oportuerit  ? 

David  Stevenson,  King's.— -Major  Dawson,  Jes. 


365 


1767- 

S.  B. — Utrum  Censoris  Roman!  disciplina  Reipublicse  utilis 
fuerit  ?  D.  Stevenson,  King's. J.  Ward,  St.  John's. 

M.  B.  —  Utrum  possessorem  bearint  saepius,  an  perdiderint, 
Divitiae  ?  W,  Arnold,  St.  John's. J.  Clowes,  Trinity. 

1768. 

S.  B. — Quidnam  causa  fuerit,  quare  Gentes  Septentrionales 
homicidia  olim  compensaverint  pecunia;  apud  hodiernas 
autem  leviora  crimina  morte  et  suppliciis  crudelissimis 
puniantur?  J.  Clowes,  Trinity. Chr.  Hunter,  Sidney. 

M.  B. — Utrum  Societates,  nuper  institutae  ad  promovendas 
Artes  et  Commercia,  magnos  artifices  et  commercia 
effecerint  ?  R.  Raikes,  St.  John's — W.  Pearce,  St.  John's. 

1769. 

S.  J3.— Speciosa  verbis,  re  mania  aut  subdola,  quanto  majore 
Libertatis  imagine  teguntur,  tanto  eruptura  ad  infensius 
Servitium.  W.  Pearce,  St.  John's — J.  Disturnel,  Pemb. 

M.  B. — Argentum  et  Aurum  propitii,  an  irati,  Dii  Germanis 
negaverint  ?  Rich.  Hey,  Sidney. Fra.  Barnes,  King's. 

1770. 

S.  B. — Privatorum  Hominum  Vitia  ad  Publica  Commoda  non 
conferunt.  Rich.  Hey,  Sidney. Fra.  Barnes,  King's. 

M.  1?.— Utrum  vera  animi  magnitudo  rebus  Adversis  magis 
quam  Secundis  perspiciatur  ? 

W.  Coxe,  King's. Geo.  Atrvood,  Trinity. 

1771. 

S.  B. — Utrum  ii,  qui  libros  in  Dialogo  scribunt,  an  qui  Con- 
tinue Sermone  praecepta  tradunt,  sapere  melius  doceant  ? 
W.  Coxe,  King's. W.  Jones,  St.  Peter's. 

M.  B — Labor  est  sapiente  dignus,  Rei  Antiquariae  inves- 
tigatio.  Thomas  Hayter,  King's. W.  Cooke,  King's. 


366 


1772. 

S.  2?.— Nature  omnes  fecit  judices,  paucos  artifices. 
Thomas  Hayter,  King's. 

M.  B. — Quid  leges  sine  moribus 

Vanae  proficiunt? 
Thomas  James,  King's.— Edw.  Law,  St.  Peter's. 

1773. 
S.  2?.— Historia  Vitae  Magistra. 

T.  James,  King's. — E.  Law,  St.  Peter's.—/.  Cranke,  Trin. 

M.  B — Oratio  ad  Graecas  Literas  excolendas  suasoria. 

W.  M.  Tomkins,  King's. T.  Robinson,  Trin. 

im"       ..  .     f 

S.  2?.— Utrum  aequum  sit,  ut  homo  homini  perpetua  obstrin- 
gatur  Servitute? 

Henry  Inglis,  King's. Rich.  Humfrey,  Corpus. 

M.  B. — Injurias  ulscisci,  an  remittere,  utrum  sit  animi  magis 
excelsi  ?  Robert  Wharton,  Pembroke. 

1775. 

S.  B. — Utrum  Divitiarum  incrementum  plus  boni,  an  mali, 
Reipublicae  afferat  ?         Charles  Sandiford,  Sidney. 

M.  B. — Qua    quis    ratione   seipsum   citra   invidiam   laudare 
possit  ?          T.  J.  Mathias,  Trin.— J.  Barlow  Scale,  Christ. 


1776. 

S.  B — Utrum  imperium  atque  artes  humaniores  Occidental! 

cursu  nationibus  sese  deferant  ? 
J.  Fawcett,  Joh — T.  J.  Mathias,  Trin /.  B  Seale,  Christ 

M .  B. — An  Constantinus  imperil  sui  sedem  jure  mutaverit  ? 
John  Legh,  Trinity. 


367 


1777- 

S.  B.  —  Utrum    Philosophies   Naturalis  et  Matheseos  cultura 
ad  Poesin  alendam  magis,  an  deprimendam,  contulerit  ? 
/.  Legk,  Trinity H.  W.  Coulthurst,  Sidney. 

M.  B. — Utrum  Ars  Critices  ad  bene  scribendum  plus  utilitatis, 
an  incommodi,  afferat  ? 

G.  Gretton,  Trin.— Gz76.  Wakefield,  Jes—J".  Jackson,  Trin. 

1778. 

S.  B.  —  De  Sapientia  Egyptiaca  disquisitio,  et  judicium. 
G.  Gretton,  Trinity Gilb.  Wakefield,  Jesus. 

M.  B.  —  Num  una  aliqua  sit  praestans  Imperil  forma,  quae 
cunctis  gentibus  optima  foret,  vel  diversae  formae  diversis 
gentibus  magis  sint  aptae  ? 

T.  Rennell,  King's W.  Taylor,  Corpus. 

1779- 

S.  B. — Utrum  ad  exemplar  poetarum  Graecorum  Chorus  in 
drama  nostrum  commode  admitti  possit  ? 

W.  Greenwood,  St.  John's. David  Owen,  St.  John's. 

M.  B. — An  Reipublicse  Romanae  felicius  fuerit  arma  extra 
Italiam  transtulisse  ? 

James  Six,  Trinity. Sam.  C.  Cox,  Trinity. 

1780. 

S.  B. — An  Ridiculum  vim  istam  in  se  habeat,  ut  per  id  solum 
argumentando  vera  a  falsis  rit£  dignoscantur  ? 
William  Cole,  King's. 

M.  B — Male  se  res  habet,  cum  quod  Virtute  effici  debet, 
id  tentatur  Pecunia. 

Edm.  Christian,  St.  John's. H.  Marsh,  St.  John's. 

Thomas  Carpendale,  St.  John's. 


368 


1781. 

S.  B. — Quaenam  sint  causse,   cur   Asiatic!  servitutis  semper 
fuerint  patientiores,  quam  Europaei? 

H.  Marsh,  St.  John's. T.  Carpendale,  St.  John's. 

M.  B. — Utru.ni  is  sit  in  Oratorum  numero  habendus,  qui  non 
sit  omnibus  iis  artibus,  quae  sunt  Libero  dignae,  perpolitus  ? 
/.  Lowther,  Trinity Josh.  Smith,  St.  John's. 

1782. 

S.  B — Utrum  auctoritati   Sacrarum   Literarum  confirmanda? 
inserviat  Mythologia  Graeca  ?          Josh.  Smith,  St.  John's, 

M.  B. — Utrum  ad  emendandos  magis,  an  corrumpendos,  civium 

mores  conferat  Musica  ? 
H.  Dampier,  King's — R.  Pedley,  Joh — P.  Douglas,  Corpus. 

1783. 

S.  B. — Utrum  plus  boni,  an  mali,  Europaeis  gentibus  attulerit 
Transatlantici  orbis  patefactio? 

H.  Dampier,  King's Thomas  Cation,  St.  John's. 

M.  B. — Ex  quibus  praecipue  causis  in  tantam  magnitudinem 

creverit  res  Romana? 
M.  Raine,  Trin.— B.  E.  Sparke,  Pemb— J.  H.  Michell,  King's. 

1784. 

S.  B — Utrum  in  bene  constitutam  Rempublicam   Supplicia 
Capitalia  admitti  debeant  ? 

Matt.  Raine,  Trinity. B.  E.  Sparke,  Pemb. 

M.  B. — Quaenam  commoda  Reipublicae  ex   Re   Militari  pro- 
veniant?       T.  Clarkson,  St.  John's. R.  Heslop,  Sidney. 

1785. 
S.  B. — An  liceat  nolentes  in  Servitutem  dare  ? 

T.  Clarkson,  St.  John's R.  Heslop,  Sidney. 

•M«  B* — Utrum  civis  pernieiosus,  an  hostis  acerbissimus,  acri- 
oribus  suppliciis  sit  coercendus  ? 

W.  Gregor,  St.  John's G.  Gordon,  St.  John's. 


369 

1786. 

S.  B. — Qusenam  prsecipue  fuerint  causes,  cur  civitates  Grseciae 
Persarum  imperio  tarn  feliciter  obstiterint  ? 

Geo.  Gordon,  St.  John's W.  Gregor,  St.  John's. 

M.  B. — Utrum  populo  Romano  melius  consultum  esset,  si 
Augustus  Rempublicam  reddidisset? 

W.  Roberts,  King's, Barry  Robertson,  St.  John's. 

1787- 

8.  B. — Utrum  insularum  in  mari  Pacifico  nuper  pate  factarum 
incolae  plus  boni,  an  mali,  ab  Europaeis  gentibus  accepturi 
sint?  Sam.  Heyrick,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Utrum  in  Republica  bene  constituta  Debitores  in 
carcerem  mittere  expediat? 

C.  Byam  Wollaston,  St.  John's. J-  Roberts,  King's. 

1788. 

S.  B. — Utrum  Indorum  Orientalium  commercia  plus  boni, 
an  mali,  Europse  gentibus  secum  afferant  ? 

Love  Robertson,  Caius. C.  Byam  Wollaston,  St.  John's. 

M .  B. — Americanis  (de  hac  re  jam  nunc  consulentibus)  quae- 
nam  forma  Imperii  magis  apta  esse  videatur  ? 
Jon.  Raine,  Trinity. 

1789- 

S.  B. — An  prosit  Scientiae  librorum  copia  ? 
J.  Raine,  Trinity. — T.  Carlyon,  Pemb. — C.  Chevallier,  Pemb. 

M.  B. — Utrum  ad  Oratorem  fingendum  valeat  Ars  magis,  an 
Natura?  J.  Whishaw,  Trinity — W.  Heberden,  St.  John's. 

1790. 

S.  B. — Utrum  mutata  apud  Gallos  Imperii  forma  plus  boni, 
an  mali,  Britannioe  allatura  sit? 

W.  Heberden,  St.  John's. /.  Whishaw,  Trinity. 

\    A 


370 

M.  B.  —  Utrum  Veris,   an  Imaginariis  bonis,  magis  promo- 
veatur  humana  felicitas? 

/.  Heys,  Trin.—  T.  Thorp,  Pet.—  E.  Thornton,  Pemb. 

1791- 

S.  B.—  Utrum  Monarchica,  an  Democratica,  regiminis  forma 
sit  potior  ?        J.  Heys,  Trinity—  G.  Haggitt,  Pembroke. 

M.  B.  —  Quid  pure  tranquillet  ? 

/.  Trveddell,  Trinity.—  J.  Drew  Borton,  Caiu&. 

1792. 

S.  B.  —  An  magnum  imperium  cum  aequa  omnium  Libertate 
constare  possit? 

J.  Tweddell,  Trinity.—  Abr.  Moore,  King's. 


M.  5.—  An  morum  emendationem,  et  virtutis  cultum,  in  nas- 
centi  Sinus  Botanici  republica  sperare  liceat  ? 

/.  H.Frere,  Caius.  -  A.  W.  Trollope,  Pembroke. 

1793. 

S.  5.—  In  Republica  bene  constitute  sint  haereditario  jure 
Nobiles. 

A.  W.  Trollope,  Pembroke.  -  J.  Sep.  Grover,  King's. 

M.  J5.—  -Utrum  in  juventute  instituendd  Matheseos  et  Philo- 
sophic Naturalis,  an  Humaniorum  Literarum  quae  vocantur, 
studia  principem  locum  obtinere  debeant  ? 

Jos.  Allen,  Trinity.  -  W.  Cooper,  St.  John's. 

1794. 
S.  B.  —  Oraculorum  origo,  natura,  et  vis. 

Jos.  Allen,  Trinity.  -  W.  Cooper,  St.  John's. 

M.  Z?.«-Utrum  apud   Romanes   Gladiatorum   spectaculo  ulla 
posset  esse  fortior  contra  dolorem  et  mortem  disciplina? 
JR.  Smith,  King's  --  T.  Grimwood  Taylor,  Trinity. 


371 


1795. 

ua  ratione   education  is   elementariae  partem  Religio 
constituere  debeat? 

R.  Smith,  King's. T.  Grimwood  Taylor,  Trinity. 

M.  B.— "Utrum  majora  incommoda  ex  Ignorantia,  an  ex  Cre- 
dulitate,  societati  afferantur  ?         W.  Jones,  St.  John's. 

1796. 

S.  J5.— Utrum    Superstitio    moribus    hominum,     aut    saluti 
civium,  Atheismo  magis  sit  inimica? 

T.  Bourdillon,  Queen's.         W.  Jones,  St.  John's. 

M.  -B.— Utrum  diversarum  gentium  indoles,  a  diversis  Imperil 

formis,  potius  quam  ex  earum  situ  explicari  possit  ? 
G.  Beresford,  St.  John's.— JF.  Tilt,  Trin — G.  A.  Browne,  Trin. 

1797. 

S.  J5.— Utrum   Eruditio  plus  boni  in  rebus  prosperis,   quam 
in  adversis,  secum  afferat? 

W.  Till,  Trinity.— G.  A.  Browne,  Trinity. 

M.  jB.— Utrum   Divites,   an   Pauperes,  majori  felicitate  gau- 
deant?      Sam.  Butler,  St.  John's.— Chr.  Bethell,  King's. 

1798. 
S.  Z?.— Utrum  Troja  unquam  extiterit  ? 

S.  Butler,  St.  John's Chr.  Wordsworth,  Trin. 

M.  jB.— -Utrum  gloriae  cupido  plus  boni,  quam  mail,  hominibus 
attulerit  ?     Dan.  Cresswett,  Trinity. Clem.  Leigh,  Chr. 

1799- 

S.  B.  —  Utrum   animum  lectoris  acrius  pertentet   Aristoteli, 
an  Platoni,  proprius  serrao? 

Clem.  Leigh,  Christ Tho.  Carr,  Trinity. 

M.  J5.~- Utrum  Statuarum  et  Numismatum  investigatio  ad  rem 
literariam  promovendam  sit  utilis  ? 

Fra,  Howes,  Trinity.—/.  Williams,  Trinity. 
A  A  2 


1800. 

$f  B. Unde  fit  ut  quasdam  Artes,  quae  apud  antiques  summa 

cum  laude  viguerint,  nos  vel  penitus  ignoremus  vel  notas 
prave  imitemur? 

Fra.  Howes,  Trinity. J.  Williams,  Trinity. 

M.B. — Utrum  civium  fortitude  Bestiarum  certaminibus,  aut 
frequenti  csedis  et  sanguinis  conspectu,  promoveatur? 
Cha.  Peers,  St.  John's /.  Hallet  Batten,  Trinity. 

1801. 

S.  B.  —  Ex   Coalescentibus    Britanniae  et  Hiberniae  imperils, 
quid  potissimum  boni  sit  sperandum? 

J.  Brown,  Trinity. Me.  C.  Tindal,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Quid   sit   causae,  cur  jam  per  plura  secula  Scientiae 
et  Liberales  Artes  non  nisi  in  Christianis  populis  floruerint  ? 
H.  Vincent  Bayley,  Trinity. G.  D'Oyly,  Corpus. 


1802. 

S.  B. — Quaenam  causae  sint,  cur  praestantissima  in  omni  opere 
ac  scientia  Ingenia  iisdem  fere  temporibus  atque  regionum 
finibus  contineri  soleant? 

H.  Vincent  Bayley,  Trin. C.  W.  Le  Bas,  Trin. 

M.  B. — Civitas  optimis  fundata  legibus  atque  institutis,  ope 
tamen  Religionis  destituta,  diu  permanere  non  potest. 
H.  Martyn,  St.  John's. C.  Grant,  Magd. 


1803. 

£•  B. — Quaenam   commoda  literis  humanioribus  oriri  possint 
ex  veterum  monumentis,  nuper  /Egypto  patefactis? 
[_No  Prizes  adjudged.^] 

M.  B.— Utrum   doctrinae  plus  adjumenti   Grseco,  an  Latino, 
sermone  accrevit  ?     W.  Paley,  Pemb.—^.  Birch,  St.  John's. 


373 


1804. 

S.  B.  —  Quid  commodi  aut  incommodi  e  republica  hominum 
Nigrorum  sive  Coloratorum,  inter  Occidentals  Insulas 
nuper  constituta,  derivari  queat? 

W.  Paley,  Pembroke.— •  G.  Macfarlan,  Trinity. 

M.  B.  —  Quibus   modis,  et  gradibus,  Civitates  jam  florentes 
paulatim  labare,  inclinare,  et  occidere  soleant? 

Geo.  Pryme,  Trinity. James  Parke,  Trinity. 

1805. 

S.  B~ — Quaenam  commoda  literis  humanioribus  oriri  possint 
ex  veterum  monumentis,  nuper  Egypto  patefactis? 

Geo.  Pryme,  Trinity. Tho.  Starkie,  Catharine. 

M.  B.  —  Quid  de  origine  et  antiquitate  poematum  Homero 
vulgo  adscriptorum  pronunciari  debeat? 

H.  Raikes,  St.  John's. S.  Berney  Vince,  King's. 


1806. 

S.  B. — E  tot  deperditis  humaniorum  literarum  apud  Grsecos 
et  Romanes  monumentis,  quaenam  pra3  caeteris  sint  de- 
sideranda  ?  Ralegh  Trevelyan,  Joh. — J.  Wray,  Trin. 

M.  B.  —  Utrum  Certamina  publice  in  Grecia  spectata  plus 
utilitatis,  an  damni,  secum  adtulerint  ? 

W.  Longley,  St.  John's. W.  G.  Cautley,  Pembroke. 


1807. 

S.  B. — Utrum  mores  civium  emendet,  an  corrumpat,    Com- 
mercium  ?  W.  G.  Cautley,  Pembroke. 

M.  B. — Utrum  literis  prosit  librorum,  quanta  nunc  est,  editorum 
Copia  ?  Ch.  S.  Matthews,  Trin — J.  Turner,  Joh. 

1808. 

S.  B — Quaenam  praccipue  sint  labentis  imperil  indicia  ? 
[_No  Exercises  sent  t/i.] 


374 

M.  5.— Quanquam  Histrionis  artem  miremur,  quaerendum 
tamen,  utrum  mores  hominum  emendet  magis,  an  cor- 
rumpat,  Scena? 

J.  Carr,  Trinity.— -Geo.  Surges,  Trinity. 

1809- 

S.  1?.— .Quaenam  praecipue  valeant  ad  imperium  stabili- 
endum  ?  H.  F.  Ainslie,  Trinity. Geo.  Surges,  Trinity. 

M .  B.— Anne  Historia  Vera  (e.  g.  Sidnaei  a  Zouchio  scripta, 

atque    nuper    edita)   plus   valeat,    quam    Fabulosa   (e.  g. 

Grandisoni   a   Richardsono  conficta)   ad  hominum  mores 

formandos  ? 

T.  S.  Hughes,  Job — C.  J.  Blomfield,  Trin — W.  Clark,  Trin. 

1810. 

S.  B. — Utrum  majori  prudentia,  eloquentia,  fortitudine,  pa- 
triaaque  amore  M.  T.  Cicero,  an  Comes  Clarendonianus, 
temporibus  gravissimis  Rempublicam  administrarit  ? 

T.  S.  Hughes,  Job.— W.  F.  Chambers,  Trin.— W.  H.  Parry,  Job. 

M.  jB.— Utrum  in  optima  reipublicae  forma  instituenda  plus 
valeat  Ingenium,  an  Experientia? 

E.  Smedley,  Trinity.— Edrv.  Alderson,  Caius. 

1811. 

S.  £.— Utrum,   in   optima   Dialogorum    ratione,    antiqui   re- 
centioribus  sint  praeponendi? 
E.  Alderson,  Caius.— -E.  Smedley,  Trin.— C.  Hewett,  Trin. 

M.B.  —  Studiorum,  quae  in  Academia  sunt  instituta,  laus  et 
utilitas.  J.  Ashbridge,  Trinity. Tho.  Musgrave,  Trin. 

1812. 

S.  B. — De   philosopbia   Platonica   disquisitio  et  judicium. 
Tho.  Musgrave,  Trinity.— -J.  Ashbridge,  Trin. 

M.  £.— Utrum  praecepta  a  Rhetoribus  tradita  verae  eloquentise 
profuisse,  an  nocuisse,  dicendum  sit? 

R.  Wilson  Evans,  Inn, Edrv.  Valentine  Blomfidd,  Emm. 


375 


1813. 

S.  5.— Quid  potissimum  boni,  vel  mali,  ab  Infimi  Ordinis 
juventute  literis  instituenda  sit  oriturum? 

R.  Wilson  Evans,  Trinity D.  J.  Maynard,  Cath. 

•W'  -#•-— Omnis  doctrina  ingenuarum  et  humanarum  artium 
uno  quodam  societatis  vinculo  continetur. 

C.  Heath,  King's. 

1814. 

S>  B.  —  Utrum  ex  hominibus  Fanaticis,  an  Scepticis,  plus 
detriment!  Respublica  capiat? 

R.  M.  Rolfe,  Downing W.  Wrightson,  Trin. 

M.  B. — Quo  magis  instituta  Civilia  et  Ecclesiastica  inter  se 
conveniant,  eo  melius  Rempublicam  administrare  licet. 
James  Schokfield,  Trinity — H.  D.  Whittington,  St.  John's. 

1815. 

S.  B.  —  Quid  causae  est  cur  apud   Romanes,   postquam  sub 
Imperatoribus  essent,  eximia  minus  florerent  ingenia? 
James  Scholejleldt  Trinity. 

M.  B.  —  Utrum  clementioris  sit  animi,  leviter  delinquentes 
suppliciis  pro  ratione  culparum  adhibitis  coercere,  an  im- 
punitos  dimittere  ?  J.  Bailey,  Trin — G.  Pearson,  Joh. 

1816. 

S.  B. — Hieroglyphicorum  origo  et  natura.         J.  Bailey,  Trin. 
Geo.  Pearson,  St.  John's Geo.  Walker,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Utrum  civitati  plus  utilitatis,  an  incommodij  afferant 
leges,  quse  privatorum  hominum  Sumptibus  modum  impo- 
nunt?  Hastings  Robinson,  Joh. — G.  Waddington,  Trin. 

1817- 
S.  Z?.-*.Utrum   Sibyllina  oracula  e    sacris    Judaeorum    libris 

compilata  fuerint? 
Hastings  Robinson,  St.  John's, James  Clarke  Franks,  Trin. 


376 

M.  B. — Utrum  recte  judicaverit  Cicero,  '  omnia  Romanes 
aut  invenisse  per  se  sapientius  quam  Graecos,  aut  accepta 
ab  illis  fecisse  meliora  ?'  J.  James  Blunt,  St.  John's, 

1818. 

S.  B. — Antiquae  Musicae  species  et  natura. 
J.  James  Blunt,  St.  John's. 

M.  B. — Inter  Graecos  et  Romanes  Historiae  scriptores  com- 
paratione  facta,  cujusnam  stylus  imitatione  maxime  dignus 
esse  videatur  ?  H.  J  Rose,  Trin — C.  J.  Heathcote,  Trin. 

1819- 

S.  B. — Quaenam  fuerit  Oraculorum  vera  indoles  ac  natura  ? 
C.  J.  Heathcote,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Inter  veterum  Philosophorum  sectas,  cuinam  potissi- 
mum  tribuenda  sit  verae  sapientiae  locus? 
Tho.  Flower  Ellis,  Trinity. 

1820. 

S.  B. — Quantum  momenti,  ad  studium  rei  Theologicae  pro- 
movendum,  habeat  literarum  humaniorum  cultus? 
f  No  Prizes  adjudged.^ 

M.  B. — In  Georgium  Tertium  TOV  naKapirrjv  Oratio  funebris. 
Tho.  Thorp,  Trinity. Edw.  Boteler,  Sidney, 

1821. 
S.  Z?.— De  origine  et  progressu  Idololatriae  Dialogus. 

Tho.  Thorp,  Trinity. Edw.  Boteler,  Sidney. 

Jun.  B.  A.— Oratio  in  laudem  Musicae. 

Edrv.  H.  Maltby,  Pemb. Arthur  Barron,  Trin. 

1822. 
S.  B. — Populis  diversis  eadem  instituta  parum  conveniunt. 

Arthur  Barron,  Trinity Ralph  Lyon,  Trinity. 

M.  #.— Astronomiae  laus  et  utilitas* 

Alfred  Ollivant,  Trin. James  Alex.  Barnes,  Trin. 


377 

1823. 

S.  B. — Quaenam    sunt    Ecclesiae    legibus    stabilitae   beneficia, 
et  qua  ratione  maxime  promovenda? 
Alfred  Ollivant,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Quinam  fructus  Historiae  Ecclesiasticae  studiosis  per- 
cipiendi  sunt  ?       C.  E.  Kennarvay,  Joh. — Geo,  Long,  Trin. 

1824. 

S.  B. — An  recentium  ingenii  vim  insitam  veterum  Poetarum 
exemplaria  promovent? 

H.  Thompson,  St.  John's. — r  W.  H.  Harriot,  Trin. 

M.  B. — Quaenam  potissimum  causae  Tragicae  Camoenae  apud 
Latinos  offecerint  ?  [No  Prizes  adjudged.^] 

1825. 

S.  B. — De  statu  futuro  quaenam  fuere  veterum  inter  Graecos 
et  Romanos  Philosophorum  Dogmata? 
J  Buckle,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Quantopere  sibi  invicem  prosint,  populi  libere  mutan- 
dis inter  se  mercibus.  [No  Prizes  adjudged.^ 

1826. 

S.  B.     Quales   fuerint   antiquorum  Philosophorum  de   animi 
immortalitate  opiniones,  et  ex  quanam  origine  ducta  ? 
J.  A.  Jeremie,  Trinity. 

M.  B. — Quibusnam    praecipue   artibus   Recentiores   Antiques 
exsuperant  ?  C.  Dade,  Caius. 

1827- 
BACHELORS. — Homerus1. 

R.  Williamson,  Trinity. W.  M.  Heald,  Trinity. 

UNDERGRADUATES.  Graecia  capta  ferum  victorem  cepit,  et  artes 
Intulit  agresti  Latio. 

E.  H.  Filzkerbert,  Trinity T.  W.  Peile,  Trin. 

1  See  p.  361. 


378 
IWilliam  iSrottm*'* 

EXTRACT    FROM   HIS    WILL. 

"  I  direct  my  Executors  to  procure  a  die  to 
be  engraved,  proper  to  strike  medals  of  gold  of 
five  guineas  value ;  the  obverse  to  be  an  imitation 
of  my  marble  medallion  bust,  the  motto  to  be 
ESSE  ET  viDERi1.  On  the  exergue  in  two 
lines,  Gulielmus  Browne,  Eques,  Nat.  in.  Non. 
Jan.  A.S.  MDCXCII  ;  on  the  reverse,  Apollo  ra- 
diated, seated  on  an  advanced  throne,,  resting  his 
lyre  on  his  left  knee  with  his  left  hand,  and 
extending  his  right  hand  with  a  laurel  wreath 
over  the  head  of  a  Scholar,  with  a  gown  and 
band,  kneeling  on  the  steps,  and  presenting  a 
scroll  in  his  right  hand,  and  holding  down  his 
square  cap  with  his  left  hand,  the  motto  Sunt 
sua  prcemia  laudi1  \  on  the  exergue  in  two  lines, 
Electus  Coll.  Med.  Lond.  Prases,  A.S.  MDCCLXV. 
With  this  shall  be  struck  two  gold  medals  of 
five  guineas  value,  and  sent  to  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor  of  Cambridge  annually,  in  the  beginning 
of  January,  to  be  given  by  him,  at  the  following 
Commencement,  to  two  Undergraduates,  one  of 
whom  shall  deliver  to  him,  in  June  before,  the 
best  Greek  Ode  in  imitation  of  Sappho  ;  the  other 
the  best  Latin  Ode  in  imitation  of  Horace,  on 
a  subject  to  be  appointed  by  him  in  January 
before :  which  Odes  shall  be  fairly  written,  dated, 

1    Great  letters- 


379 

and  subscribed  by  the  authors,  in  a  book  to  be 
laid  on  the  Register's  table  for  public  inspection, 
at  the  Commencement.  And  I  charge  my  estates 
for  the  perpetual  performance  of  this  annual 
bequest." 

IN   THE    CODICIL. 

"  I  will  that  a  third  gold  Medal,  of  like  kind 
with  those  two  in  my  Will  mentioned.,  shall  be 
sent  by  my  Executor,  annually,  with  those  two, 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor  of  that  University  for 
the  time  being;  to  be  given  by  him  to  the 
Undergraduate  who  shall  produce  the  best  Greek 
Epigram,  after  the  model  of  Anthologia,  and  the 
best  Latin  Epigram,  after  the  model  of  Martial, 
on  a  subject  of  his  appointing ;  to  be  given,  all 
three,  on  the  Commencement  day. 

"  I  charge  my  estates  also  with  this  third 
Medal  for  ever." 

Copied  from  a  copy  in  a  Book  of  the  Vice- Chancellor's. 

The  subjects  of  the  Epigrams  are  to  be  given 
by  the  Vice-Chancellor  in  January,  and  the 
Epigrams  are  delivered  to  him  in  June,  as  is 
ordered  concerning  the  Odes. 

The  Vice-Chancellor's  notice  mentions  the 
manner  of  sending  the  Exercises  to  him,  &c. 


380 


SIR  WILLIAM    BROWNE's    MEDALS. 

1775. 

GREEK  ODE.     In  Memoriam  Gul.  Browne  Equitis,  M.D. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     E.  Cooke,  King's.        [W.  Cole,  King's. 

1776. 

GREEK  ODE.     Bellum  Americanum.     J.  Hayter,  King's. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     James  Six,  Trinity. 
EPIGR.  GR.  ET  LAT.     Inest  sua  gratia  parvis.     W.  Cole,  Kgs. 

[E.  Sayer,  Trinity. 

1777- 

GREEK  ODE.     Herculanei  prostrati  reliquiae.    J.  Hand,  King's. 
LATIN  ODE.      Idem.     Tho.  Gisborne,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Cui  placet  alterius,  sua  nimirum  est  odio  sors. 

[James  Six,  Trinity. 

1778. 

GREEK  ODE.     Wolfii  in  Canada  resgestae  et  mors.     J.  Walker, 
LATIN  ODE.      Idem..   J.  Lorvther,  Trinity.  £Emman. 

EPIGRAMS.         Nisi  utile  quod  facimus,  frustra  est  gloria. 

[Spencer  Madan,  Trinity. 

1779- 

GREEK  ODE.     Artis  Medicae  laus.     B.  E.  Sparke,  Pemb. 
LATIN  ODE.      Idem.         Jos.  Pott,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Decipit   exemplar   vitiis   imitabile. 

{J.  H.  MicheU,  King's. 

1780. 

GREEK  ODE.  In  obitum  moestissimum  Jacobi  Cook,  navis 
bellicae  Praefecti,  Navigatoris  celeberrimi,  ictu 
lethifero  barbaricorum  repentine  abrepti. 

[J.  H.  MicheU,  King's. 
LATIN  ODE.      Idem.       C.  Hayes,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Dictum  sapienti  sat  est.     J.  H.  Michell,  King's. 


381 


1781. 

GREEK  ODE.     Strages  insulis  Occidentals  Indiae  nuper  illata. 

[V.  Goodall,  King's. 

LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     B.  Newton,  Jesus. 
EPIGRAMS.         Bellus  homo  Academicus.      J.  Goodall,  King's. 

1782. 

GREEK  ODE.     Ad  Pacem.      J.  Goodall,  King's. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.       M.  T.  Becker,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Stans  pede  in  uno.       J.  Goodall,  King's. 

1783. 

GREEK  ODE.     Arx   Calpeia  obsidione  liberata. 
LATIN  ODE.      Idem.  [Rich.  Ramsden,  Trinity. 

EPIGRAMS.         In  tenui  labor.      Jonathan  Raine,  Trinity. 

1784.  [Trinity. 

GREEK  ODE.  Calabria  terrae  motu  vastata.  Rick.  Ramsden, 
LATIN  ODE.  Idem.  C.  B.  Wollaston,  Job. — J.  Reeves,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.  Globus  Aerostaticus.  G.  Stevenson,  King's, 

1785. 

GREEK  ODE.     Parentalia'Handeliana.         Jon.  Raine,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Jonathan  Raine,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.         Ut    res   dant   sese,   ita   magni   atque   humiles 
sumus.       Jonathan  Raine,  Trinity. 


1786. 
GREEK  ODE.     In  naufragium  luctuosum  Ricardi  Peircii. 

[V.  Raine,  Trinity. 

LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     A.  Moore,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Nugis  addere  pondus.     Tho.  Thompson,  Trin. 


382 


1787- 

GREEK  ODE.     Georgium  Sidus.      Abraham  Moore,  King's. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Geo.  Seltvyn,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         'Ou    TO   ^eya    cu    CO-TI,    TO   oe  eu  /ueyct. 

[Fra.  Wrangham,  Magdalene. 

1788. 

GREEK  ODE.     Batavia  rediviva.     J.  Tweddell,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.      J.  Tweddell,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.         Quid  novi  ?     J.  Tweddell,  Trinity. 

1789- 
GREEK  ODE.     Neque  enim  loculis  comitantibus  itur 

Ad  casum  Tabulae,  posita  sed  luditur  area. 

[/.  Trveddell,  Trinity. 

LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Geo.  Matthew,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.        Ludentis  speciem  dabit  et  torquebitur. 

[J.  Tweddell,  Trinity. 

1790. 

GREEK  ODE.    Bastilia  expugnata.     Edtv.  Maltby,  Pembroke. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     T.  Grimrvood  Taylor,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.         Artis  est  celare  artem.     E.  Maltby,  Pembroke. 

1791. 

GREEK  ODE.     Mare  Liberum.     £.  Maltby,  Pembroke. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Rob.  Smith,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Nesciunt  quanto  plus  dimidium  sit  toto. 

[/.  Doncaster,  Christ. 

1792. 

GREEK  ODE.     Sors  misera  Servorum  in  insulis  India?  Occi- 

dentalis.     S.  T.  Coleridge,  Jesus. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Sam.  Butler,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Purpura  vendit 

Causidicum.  —     /.  Belcher,  Clare 


383 


GREEK  ODE. 
LATIN  ODE. 
EPIGRAMS. 


1793. 

Astronomiae  laus.    J.  Keate,  King's. 
Sam.  Butler,  St.  John's. 
irporepov.    J.  Keate,  King's. 


Idem. 


1794. 

GREEK  ODE.    Graiis  ingenium,  Graiis  dedit  ore  rotundo 

Musa  loqui.  -     Sam.  Butler,  St.  John's. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     J.  Keate,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.        Simplex  munditiis.     Geo.  Caldrvell,  Jesus. 

1795. 

GREEK  ODE.     Commercii  laus.     J.  Keate,  King's. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Geo.  D'Oyly,  Corpus. 
EPIGRAMS.         Vir  bonus  est  quis?     Geo.  Strachey,  King's. 

1796. 

GREEK  ODE.    Classis   Occidentalis   Indiae   tempestate    nuper 

disjecta.     Geo.  Strachey,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Rich.  Parry,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.          ^py  <^^o-v,  tj  Kpeivaova  cry*;?  \eyetv.      W.  Frere, 

[Trinity. 

1797- 

GREEK  ODE.     Italia  vastata.     W,  Frere,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     J.  Hunt,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.         Insaniens  Sapientia.     W.  Frere,  Trinity. 


1798. 

GREEK  ODE.     Toto    divisos    orbe   Britannos.     Barth.   Frere, 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     P.  Warren,  Trinity.  [Trinity. 

EPIGRAMS.         Quicquid  Graecia  mendax 

Audet  in  Historia. Barth,  Frere,  Trinity 


384     ' 


1799- 

GREEK  ODE.     Pontifex  Italia  extorris.     /.  H.  Smyth,  Trinity. 
LATIN   ODE.     Idem.     J.  H.  Smyth.  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.         Ipse  dixit.     J.  G.  Durham,  Corpus. 

1800. 

GREEK  ODE.     Mysore!  Tyranni  mors.     J.  H.  Smyth,  Trinity. 
LATIN   ODE.     Idem.     J.  B.  Sumner,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Tuta  time.     J.  G.  Durham,  Corpus. 

1801. 

GREEK  ODE.     Melita  Britannis  subacta.     Rob.  Walpole,  Trin. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Hon.  Fred.  Robinson,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Nugae  canorae.     Geo.  Pryme,  Trinity. 

1802. 

GREEK  ODE.     Pompeii  Columna.     Geo.  Pryme,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     James  Parke,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.         ^Ktji/n  Tra?  o/3<o?.     C.  Bayley,  Christ. 

1803. 

GREEK  ODE.     Helvetiorum  luctus  et  querimoniae.     C.  Bayley, 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     H.  H.  Knapp,  King's.  QChrist. 

EPIGRAMS.         Ex  nitido  fit  rusticus.     J.  F.  Plumptre,  King's. 

1804. 

GREEK  ODE.     Graecia  hodierna.     W.  E.  P.  Tomline,  Trinity. 
LATIN    ODE.      E<?  ouavos  apurTOS  afjiwea-Oat  -jrepi  TrctTpt)?. 

[B.H.Drury,  King's. 

EPIGRAMS.  I  GR*       Simulacrum  Cereris  Eleusine  deportatum. 
\  LAT.     Veteres  aviae.  B.  H.  Drury,  King's. 

1805. 
GREEK  ODE.     In  obitum  mosstissimum  Ducis  D'Enghien. 

[W.  E,  P.  Tamline,  Trinity, 


385 


LATIN  ODE.     In  obitum  moestissimum  Ducis  D'Enghien. 

[C.  J.  Blomfield,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.        Quid  noster  Roscius  egit  ?    J.  K.  Miller,  Trin. 

1806. 

GREEK  ODE.     Mors  Nelsoni.     C.  J.  Blomfield,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     Thomas  Smart  Hughes,  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Mf/Be*  a^av.    J.  K.  Miller,  Trinity. 


1807- 

GREEK  ODE.     In  obitum  Gulielmi  Pitt.     T.  S.  Hughes,  Job. 
LATIN  ODE.     Idem.     J.  Lonsdale,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Me^a  fii/3\iov,  pe^a  KCIKOV.     E.  Alderson,  Caius. 


1808. 

GREEK  ODE.     Veris  comites.     Thomas  Rennell,  King's. 
LATIN  ODE.     Finibus  expulsum  patriis,  nova  regna  patentem. 

\_Hon.  E.  Law,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Beatus  vulnere.     Edn>.  Val.  Blomfield,  Caius. 

1809- 

GREEK  ODE.     Desiderium  Porsoni.     E.  Val.  Blonifield,  Caius. 
LATIN  ODE.     Lusitania  liberata.     J.  Lonsdale,  King's. 
f  GREEK.  — 


(.LATIN  —  Strenua  inertia.     E.  H.  Barker,  Trin. 

1810. 

GREEK  ODE.  Ad  REGEM. 

Serus  in  coelum  redeas,  diuque 
Laetus  intersis  populo.  - 

\_Edrv.  Valentine  Blomfield,  Caius. 

LATIN  ODE.     Injuriarum  Africanarum  finis. 

\_Edw.  Valentine  Blomfield,  Caius. 

r  GREEK.  —  Bi(3\io/jiavia. 
EPIGRAMS.  <  . 

t  LATIN.    -  Brevis  esse  laboro, 

Obscurus  fio. 

\_W.  Sheepshanks,  Trinity. 
BB 


1811. 

GREEK  ODE.     In  Obitum  Illustrissimae  Principissae  Amelia?. 

[James  Bailey,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Preelium  cum  Gallis  in  Busaci  montibus  com- 

missum.     Geo.  Waddington,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.        H  ovyi/v  natpiov,  tj  \oyov  «0€\«/At>i/. 

[James  Bailey,  Trinity. 

1812. 

GREEK  ODE.  Crinemque  timendi 

Sideris,  et  terris  mutantem  regna  Cometen. 

[J.  Tyas,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Honesta*    Paupertatis    laus. 

[Marm.  Lawson,  St.  John's. 

1813. 
GREEK  ODE.     Victoria  Salmanticae  parta.   S.  G.  Price,  Trinity. 

LATIN  ODE.     Mosqua  flammis  tradita,  et  Gallis  erepta. 

[Walter  Strickland,  Trinity. 

EPIGRAMS.        Napoleon  ab  exercitu  suo  fugiens. 

[Walter  Strickland,  Trinity. 

1814. 

GREEK  ODE.     Wellingtonus    regionem    Gallicam,    Pyrenaeis 
montibus  subjectam,  despiciens. 

[J.  Hutton  Fisher,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Germania   Lipsiae   vindicata. 

[J.  James  Blunt,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.        Victor  interum  fugiens.     G.  Waddington,  Trin. 

1815. 
GREEK  ODE.     In  Augustissimum   Galliae   Regem  solio  avito 

redditum.      /.  Hutton  Fisher,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.    Vivos  ducent  de  marmore  vultus. 

[G.  Stainforth,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS,         Quicquid  dicam,  aut  erit  aut  non 


38? 


1816. 

GREEK  ODE.     Napoleon  in  insulam  Sanctae  Helena?  ablegatust 

(V.  Hutton  Fisher,  Trinity, 
LATIN  ODE.     Statuae  Tabulaeque  pictae  Italiae  restitute. 

\W.  N.  Lettsom,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.        Labor  ineptiarum.       W.  N.  Lettsom,  Trinity. 

1817. 

GREEK  ODE.    Ta  Trai/ra,  £ov  OTI  Ka\a  Xtav.     Geo.  Stainforth, 

[Trinity. 

LATIN  ODE.     lol  debellata.     W.  N.  Lettsom,  Trinity. 
EPIGRAMS.         *Ai  Sevrepat  <ppovri&6<:  ffo(f>(oTcpat,  J.  Penningtonf 

[King's. 

1818. 

GREEK  ODE.  In  obitum  Illustrissimae  Principissae  Carolettae 
Augustas,  Georgii  Walliae  Principis  filiaB. 

IT.  H.  Hall,  King's. 

LATIN  ODE.  In  Memoriam  Ricardi,  Vice-Comitis  Fitz- 
william,  Musei  Fitzwilliam.  Fundatori* 
munifici. 

EPIGRAMS.        Magna  civitas  magna  solitudo.    E.  H.  Maltby, 

[Pembroke. 

1819- 

GREEK  ODE.     Reginae  Epicedium.     Horat.  Waddington,  Trin- 
LATIN  ODE.     Thebae  ^gyptiacae.     T.  H.  Hall,  King's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Discrimen  obscurum.     Rich.  Okes,  King's. 

1820. 

Prizes  not  disposed  of  in  former  years. 
LATIN  ODE.     Xpva-ea  (pop/juyg.     H.  Thompson,  St.  John's, 
GREEK   EPIGRAM.      Eis   ayaXfjia   TI;?   juaKa^iriBo?    Ka^oXcrrac, 


TOV  T<DV 


Bvyarcpos. 

LATIN  EPIGRAM.     Optimos  nos  esse  dum  infirmi  sumus. 

{Rich.  Oke.s,  King's. 


388 


1820. 
GREEK  ODE.    Mv^oawtj.     Hor.  Nelson  Coleridge,  King's. 

LATIN  ODE.     Ad   Georgium  IV.  Augustissimum  Principem, 
sceptra  paterna  accipientem. 

[  Hor.  Nelson  Coleridge,  King's. 
f  GREEK. —  In   venam  aquae   ex   imis   visceribus 
EPIGRAMS.  <  terrae  arte  eductam. 

v.  LATIN.  —  Impransi  disquirite.     JR.  Okes,  King's. 


1821. 

GREEK  ODE.     OKcai/o?  o'  'Yirepftopeo*.     Hor.  Nelson  Coleridge, 

[King's. 

LATIN  ODE.     Maria  Scotorum  Regina.     C.  Fursden,  Down. 
EPIGRAMS.         E-jrajfei/  dpa  ffTrovSafwv.     Edrv.  Baines,  Christ. 


1822. 
GREEK  ODE.     Pyramides  JEgyptiacae. 

[Winthrop  Mackworth  Praed,  Trinity. 
LATIN  ODE.     Mors  Napoleonis. 

/-  GREEK. — E^w  re  S^TO,  *'  OUK  epta. 

EPIGRAMS.  <|  LATIN.     Nugae  seria  ducunt 

v.  In  mala. 

[Wintkrop  Mackworth  Praed,  Trinity. 

1823. 

GREEK  ODE.  In  obitum  Viri  admodum  ReVerendi  Doctissi- 
mique  T.  F.  Middleton,  Episcopi  Calcut- 
tensis.  Winthrop  Mackworth  Praed,  Trinity. 

LATIN  ODE.     Africani  catenis  devincti. 

GREEK. — Eai/  >/?  <bi\ona6t]<;,  e<rrj 


EPIGRAMS.       T 

I  LATIN.  -—  Oc  (bcwyei,  TTO\IV 


[/.  Wilder,  King's. 


389 


1824. 

GREEK  ODE.      ft  ireuBec  'E\\qvtov  tre  eXevOepovre  irarpiV,  c\ev- 

6epovre     Be     TrcttSe?,     jwaiKai vvv     virep 

TTO.VTQIV  «7&)i/.     B.  H.  Kennedy)  St.  John's. 
LATIN   ODE.     Aleppo    Urbs    Syriae    terrae    motu    funditus 

eversa.     B.  H.  Kennedy,  St.  John's. 
EPIGRAMS.         Scribimus  docti  indoctique. 

[Winthrop  Mackworth  Praed,  Trinity. 


1825. 

GREEK  ODE.      Avbptov  €irt<pavu>v  ira<ra.  ytj  Ta<f)os. 

[W.  Selwyn,  St.  John's. 
LATIN   ODE.     Academia  Cantabrigiensis  tot  novis  JEdificiis 

ornata.     Robert  Snow,  St.  John's. 
T  GREEK. — Ylepuro-oi  Trcti/re?  01  \  jueo-w  Atyyoi. 
^  LATIN.  — Suramum  jus,  summa  injuria. 

IB.  H.  Kennedy,  St.  John's. 


EPIGRAMS. 


1826. 

GREEK  ODE.     Delphi.     W.  Selrvyn,  St.  John's. 
LATIN   ODE.     Iris.     W.  Selrvyn,  St.  John's. 

GREEK.— EKO)V  deKovri  76  6ufj.io. 

EPIGRAMS.   <  LATIN.  — Eloquiumve  oculi  aut  facunda  silentia 
linguae.     W.  Selwyn,  St.  John's. 


1827- 

GREEK  ODE.     Sanctius  his  animal 

Deerat  adhuc,  et  quod  dominari  in  ccetera  posset: — 
Natus  Homo  est.  —      W.  Selrvyn,  St.  John's. 

LATIN  ODE.     Iphigenia  in  Aulide.     Chr.  Wordsworth,  Trin. 

EPIGRAMS.         \\aQwara,  naOtinara.     Chr,  Wordsworth,  Trin. 


390 


The  Rev.  CHARLES  BURNEY,  D.D.  and  the 
Rev.  JOHN  CLEAVER  BANKES,  M.A.  only  sur- 
viving trustees  of  a  fund  raised  by  the  friends  of 
the  late  PROFESSOR  PORSON,  and  appropriated 
to  his  use  during  his  life-time,  after  various  dis- 
positions of  part  of  the  said  fund,  did,  by  deed, 
bearing  date  the  27th  November,  1816,  transfer 
to  the  University  the  sum  of  <£400.  Navy  5  per 
cents,  upon  trust,  that  the  interest  arising  there- 
from shall  be  annually  employed  in  the  purchase 
of  one  or  more  Greek  books,  to  be  given  to  an 
Undergraduate  yearly,  at  the  Commencement,  as 
a  prize  for  Greek  Verses,  by  the  name  of  the 
PORSON  UNIVERSITY  PRIZE. 

The  Verses  to  be  a  translation  of  a  passage  or 
passages  in  some  play  of  Shakspeare,  Ben  Jonson, 
Massinger,  or  Beaumont  and  Fletcher,  selected  by 
the  Vice-Chancellor  or  his  Deputy,  and  announced 
or  published  a  reasonable  time  before  the  Com- 
mencement. The  metre  of  the  translation,  if  the 
selection  be  from  a  Tragedy,  shall  be  Tragicum 
lambicum  Trimetrum  Acatalecticum,  or  Tragi- 
cum Trochaicum  Tetrametrum  Catalecticum ;  if 
the  selection.be  from  a  Comedy,  the  metre  of  the 
translation  shall  be  Comicum  lambicum  Trime- 
trum Acatalecticum,  or  Comicum  Trochaicum 
Catalecticum.  The  plan  adopted  in  the  case  of 
Sir  William  Browne's  Prizes  to  be  followed  as 
far  as  relates  to  ascertaining  the  Author  of  the 
prize,  without  disclosure  of  the  names  of  the  other 


391 


Candidates.  The  exercises  must  be  distinctly 
written  and  accentuated,  and  accompanied  by  a 
literal  Latin  prose  version  of  the  Greek,  and  sent 
in  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  on  or  before  the  30th 
of  April.  The  Examiners  appointed  are,  the 
Vice-Chancellor  or  his  Deputy,  the  Provost  of 
King's,  the  Masters  of  Trinity,  St.  John's, 
Christ's,  and  Caius  Colleges,  the  Greek  Pro- 
fessor, and  the  Public  Orator;  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor, or  his  Deputy,  to  have  a  casting  vote  if 
necessary.  The  prize  translation  is  to  be  printed 
at  the  expence  of  the  author,  and  copies  to  be 
given  to  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  Heads  of 
Houses,  previous  to  the  Commencement,  at  which 
time  it  is  to  be  recited  in  the  Senate-House. 
And  if  in  any  year  there  be  no  translation  worthy 
of  the  prize,  the  book  or  books  provided  for  that 
year  shall  be  reserved  and  given  to  the  Candidate 
who  shall  be  considered  second  best  in  the  sub- 
sequent year,  and  so  from  time  to  time  the  book 
or  books  provided  in  any  year,  and  not  given  in 
that  year  as  a  prize,  shall  be  reserved  till  the 
Examiners  shall  adjudge  the  same  to  be  given  in 
some  subsequent  year  to  a  Candidate  whose 
translation  is  second  best,  or  third  best  to  the 
prize  translation,  but  worthy  to  be  rewarded, 
and  then  shall  be  disposed  of  accordingly;  pro- 
vided also  that  they  be  printed  and  recited  as 
in  the  case  of  the  prize  translation.  All  the 
prize  translations,  and  every  such  second  best  or 
third  best  translation,  shall  be  transcribed  in  a 
book  to  be  kept  by  the  Vice-Chancellor. 


392 


PORSON    PRIZE. 

1817 HENRY  IV.  PART  II.  Act  III.  Scene  2. 

beginning "  O  Sleep,"  &c. 

and  ending "  deny  it  to  a  King." 

George  Jacob  Pennington,  King's. 

1818 HENRY  VIII.  Act  III.  Scenes. 

beginning 

"  Cromwell,  I  did  not  think  to  shed  a  tear,"  &c. 
and  ending 

"He  would  not  in  mine  age 
Have  left  me  naked  to  mine  enemies." 

W.  Sidney  Walker,  Trinity. 

1819. CORIOLANUS,  Act  III.  Scene  2. 

beginning "Thou  know'st  great  son,"  &c. 

and  ending "  let    us    shame    him   with 

our  knees," 

Horatio  Waddington,  Trinity. 

1820 MACBETH,  Act  I.  last  Scene. 

beginning 

"  We  will  proceed  no  further  in  this  business,"  &c. 
and  ending 

."  False  face  must  hide  what  the  false  heart  doth 
know." 

W.  H.  F.  Talbot,  Trinity. 
1821 OTHELLO,  Act  I.  Scene  3. 


"  And  till  she  comes,  as  truly  as  to  Heaven,"  &c< 
and  ending 

"  Here  comes  the  lady,  let  her  witness  it." 
W.  Barham,  Trinity. 


393 

1822 JULIUS  CESAR,  Act  IV.  Scene  3. 

Brutus  and  Cassius. 

W.  Barham,  Trinity. 

1 823 HENRY  VIII.  Act  V.  Scene  6. 

beginning "  This  Royal  Infant/'  &c. 

and  ending "  and  so  stand  fix'd." 

B.  H.  Kennedy,  St.  John's. 

1824 MERCHANT  OP  VENICE,  Act  IV.  Scene  1. 


"  Of  a  strange  nature  is  the  suit  you. follow,"  &c> 
and  ending 

"  Penalty  and  forfeit  of  my  bond." 

B.  H.  Kennedy,  St.  John's. 

1825 KING  JOHN,  Act  IV.  Scene  2. 


"How  oft  the  sight  of  means/'  &c. 
and  ending 

"  an  innocent  child." 

John  Hodgson,  Trinity. 


1826 KING  JOHN,  Act  III.  Scenes. 

beginning "  Come  hither  Hubert,"  &c. 

and  ending. ....  —  "  I  think  thou  lov'st  me  well." 
B.  H.  Kennedy,  St.  John's. 

1S27... As  You  LIKE  IT,  Act  IL  Scene  3. 

beginning "  But  not  so :  I  have,"  &c. 

and  ending "  with  truth  and  loyalty." 

John  Wordsworth,  Trinity. 


394 


The  Rev.  ROBERT  SMITH,  D.D.  late  Master 
of  Trinity  College,  left  two  annual  prizes  of  .£25. 
each,  to  two  Commencing  Bachelors  of  Arts,  the 
best  proficients  in  Mathematics  and  Natural 
Philosophy.  The  examination  is  soon  after  the 
admission  of  the  Questionists.  The  adjudicators 
are,  the  Chancellor  or  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Master 
of  Trinity,  the  Lucasian,  Plumian,  and  Lowndean 
Professors.  Cceteris  paribus,  preference  is  to  be 
given  to  Candidates  of  Trinity  College. 

f&r,  $eatonf0  $ri$*  IJornt. 

Mr.  SEATON  gives  his  Kingslingbury  estate 
to  the  University  of  Cambridge  for  ever;  the 
rents  of  which  shall  be  disposed  of  yearly  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor  for  the  time  being ;  as  he  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  the  Master  of  Clare  Hall,  and 
the  Greek  Professor  for  the  time  being,  or  two 
of  them,  shall  agree:  which  three  Persons  afore- 
said shall  give  out  a  subject ;  which  subject  shall, 
for  the  first  year,  be  one  or 'other  of  the  perfections 
or  attributes  of  the  Supreme  Being;  and  so  the 
succeeding  years,  till  that  subject  is  exhausted. 
And  afterwards  the  subject  shall  be  either  Death, 
Judgment,  Heaven,  Hell,  Purity  of  Heart,  &c. 
or  whatsoever  else  may  be  judged  by  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  Master  of  Clare  Hall,  and  Greek 
Professor,  to  be  most  conducive  to  the  honour 
of  the  Supreme  Being,  and  recommendation  of 


395 


virtue.  And  they  shall  yearly  dispose  of  the 
rent  of  the  above  estate  to  that  Master  of  Arts, 
whose  Poem  on  the  subject  given,  shall  be  best 
approved  by  them:  which  Poem,  he  ordains,  to 
be  always  in  English,  and  to  be  printed;  the 
expence  of  which  shall  be  deducted  out  of  the 
product  of  the  estate,  and  the  residue  given  as 
a  reward  to  the  Composer  of  the  Poem,  or  Ode, 
or  Copy  of  Verses. 

The  Vice-Chancellor,  the  Master  of  Clare 
Hall,  and  the  Greek  Professor  (who  decide  this 
Prize)  fix  on  the  subject,  which  is  delivered  out 
in  January,  and  the  Poems  are  to  be  sent  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor  on  or  before  the  29th  of  Sep- 
tember. The  Prize  is  annually  determined  in 
the  latter  end  of  October. 

The  names  of  the  unsuccessful  Candidates  are 
destroyed,  as  in  the  case  of  the  Bachelors  Ex- 
ercises. 

SEATONIAN    PRIZE. 

1750.  The  Eternity  of  the  Supreme  Being.     C.  Smart,  Pemb. 

1 751 .  The  Immensity  of  the  Supreme  Being.   C.  Smart,  Pemb. 

1752.  The  Omniscience  of  the  Supreme  Being.  C.  Smart,  Pemb. 

1753.  The  Power  of  the  Supreme  Being.       C.  Smart,  Pemb. 

1754.  The  Justice  of  the  Supreme  Being.    Geo.  Bally,  King's. 

1755.  The  Goodness  of  the  Supreme  Being.    C.  Smart,  Pemb. 

1756.  The  Wisdom  of  the  Supreme  Being.    G.  Bally,  King's. 

1757.  The  Day  of  Judgement.     Robert  Glynn,  King's. 

1 758.  The  Providence  of  the  Supreme  Being.  G.  Bally,  King's. 

1759.  Death.     Beilby  Porteus,  Christ. 


396 


1760.  Heaven.     James  Scott,  Trinity. 

1761.  Purity  of  Heart.     James  Scott,  Trinity. 

1762.  Repentance.     James  Scott,  Trinity. 

1763.  The  Redemption.     J.  Hey,  Sidney. 

1764.  The  Conversion  of  St.  Paul.     /.  Lettice,  Sidney. 

1765.  The  Crucifixion.     Thomas  Zouch,  Trinity. 

1766.  The  Gift  of  Tongues. 

1767.  The  Gift  of  Tongues.     Charles  Jenner,  Sidney. 

1768.  The  Destruction  of  Nineveh.     Charles  Jenner,  Sidney. 

1 770.  The  Dedication  of  the  Temple  of  Solomon.    W.  Hodson, 

1 77 1 .  Conscience.  [Trinity. 

1772.  Conscience.     W.  Gibson,  Pemb. 

1773.  Charity.     Charles  Peter  Layard,  ,St.  John's. 

1774.  Duelling. 

1775.  Duelling.     C.  P.  Layard,  St.  John's S.  Hayes,  Trin. 

1776.  Prophecy.     Samuel  Hayes,  Trinity. 
1777-  Prayer.     Samuel  Hayes,  Trinity. 

1778.  The  Nativity.     Samuel  Hayes,  Trinity. 

1779.  The  Ascension. 

1780.  The  Ascension.     Thomas  Hughes,  St.  John's. 

1781.  The  Destruction  of  Jerusalem  by  the  Romans. 

[W.  Gibson,  Pemb. 

1782.  The  Call  of  the  Gentiles.     Spencer  Madan,  Trinity. 

1783.  Hope.     Samuel  Hayes,  Trinity. 

1784.  The  Creation.     Samuel  Hayes,  Trinity. 

1785.  The  Exodus.     Samuel  Hayes,  Trinity. 

1786.  The  Resurrection. 

1787.  The  Resurrection. 

1788.  The  Resurrection. 

1789-  The  Deluge.     J.  Roberts,  King's. 

1790.  Faith.     Charles  Philpott,  Emman. 

1791-  Humility.     Charles  Philpott,  Emman. 

1 792.  The  Restoration  of  the  Jews. 

1793.  The  Restoration  of  the  Jews. 


397 

1794-  The  Restoration  of  the  Jews.     F.  Wrangham,  Trin.  H. 

1795.  The  Destruction  of  Babylon.     A.  W.  Trollope,  Pemb. 

1 796.  The  Mercy  of  God. 

1797-  Miracles.     W.  Bolland,     Trinity. 

1798.  The  Epiphany.     W.  Bolland,  Trinity. 

1799-  St.  Paul  at  Athens.     W.  Bolland,  Trinity. 

1800.  The  Holy  Land.     Francis  Wrangham,  Trinity. 

1801.  St.  Peter's  Denial  of  Christ. 

1802.  St.  Peter's  Denial  of  Christ.     W.  Cockburn,  St.  John's. 

1803.  Raising  Jairus'  Daughter.     W.  Cockburn,  St.  John's. 

1804.  Moses  viewing  the  Promised  Land.     C.  Hoyle,  Trin. 

1 805.  Christ's  Lamentation  over  Jerusalem.     C.  Peers,  Joh. 

1806.  Paul  and  Barnabas  at  Lystra.     Charles  Hoyle,  Trin. 
1807-  The  Shipwreck  of  St.  Paul.     C.  J.  Hoare,  St.  John's. 

1808.  The  Holy  Wars.     B.  T.  H.  Cole,  Magd. 

1809.  The  Conquest  of  Canaan.     George  Pryme,  Trinity. 

1810.  The  Death  of  Abel. 

1811.  The  Sufferings  of  the  Primitive  Martyrs. 

\_  Francis  Wrangham,  Trinity. 

1812.  Joseph  made  known  to  his  Brethren. 

[Francis  Wrangham,  Trinity. 

1813.  Death  of  Saul  and  Jonathan.     E.  Smedley,  Sidney. 

1814.  Jephthah  meeting  his  Daughter  after  his  rash  Vow. 

[E.  Smedley,  Sidney. 

1815.  Jonah.     J.  W.  Bellamy,  Queen's. 

1816.  Hezekiahand  Sennacherib.     C.  H.  Terrott,  Trinity. 

1817.  Belshazzar's  Feast.     Thomas  Smart  Hughes,  Emman. 
IS  18.  Deborah.     Alldersey  DicJcen,  St.  Peter's. 

1819-  Moses  receiving  the  Tables  of  the  Law. 

1820.  The  Omnipresence  of  the  Supreme  Being. 

[Edward  B.  Elliott,  Trinity, 

1821.  The  Old  Age  of  St.  John  the  Evangelist. 

1822.  Antiochus  Epiphanes  (1  Mace,  i.,  &c.) 

1323.  Cornelius.  [Edward  B.  Elliott,  Trinity. 


398 


1824.  The  Death  of  Absalom.     H.  S.  Beresf&rd,  Clare. 

1825.  The  Building  and  Dedication  of  the  Second  Temple. 

{John  Ovetton,  Trinity. 

1826.  The  Transfiguration. 

1827.  The  Marriage  at  Caiia  in  Galilee. 

Jttr.  Jlorrto'0  <&0*atg* 

Mr.  NORRIS  left  the  sum  of  twelve  pounds 
yearly,  as  a  reward  for  the  best  prose  English 
Essay,  on  some  such  subjects  as  he  particularly 
mentions  in  his  Grant.  Seven  pounds  four  shil- 
lings of  the  money  shall  be  expended  upon  a  gold 
medal,  the  residue  of  it  to  be  disposed  of  in  .books. 

He  leaves  the  adjudication  of  superior  merit 
in  the  Essays  to  the  opinion  of  the  three  Stew- 
ards ;  and  if  they  are  not  agreed,  to  a  majority, 
when  the  Professor  under  this  institution,  and  the 
Hebrew  and  Greek  Professors  have  been  first 
called  in. 

Each  Candidate  must  not  be  under  twenty 
years  of  age,  or  above  thirty.  He  must  be,  or 
have  been,  a  Student  of  this  University.  He 
must  have  attended  the  lectures  of  the  Norrisian 
Professor  twenty  times  in  the  course  of  one  year ; 
and  this  attendance  is  to  be  signified  to  the 
Stewards,  under  the  Professor's  hand. 

The  Professor  shall  propound  each  year's 
thesis;  and  he  shall  cause  it  to  be  published  in 
one  of  the  most  public  London  papers ;  and  such 
publication  shall  be  always  within  the  first  ten 
days  of  every  November.  The  Essays  are  to  be 


399 


sealed  up,  as  customary  in  other  probationary 
Exercises,  and  sent  to  one  of  the  three  Stewards, 
on  or  before  the  tenth  day  preceding  the  Sunday 
in  every  Passion  week.  And  on  the  Thursday 
morning  preceding  every  Good  Friday,  shall  the 
successful  Candidate  know  the  adjudication,  and 
shall  within  fourteen  days  receive  the  Medal,  and 
the  books:  provided  always  that,  at  the  time  of 
receiving  them,  he  gives  a  promissory  note  for 
the  payment  of  twelve  pounds  to  the  Trustees, 
or  owner  of  the  estate  whence  arises  the  annuity, 
in  case  he  does  not  cause  such  Essay,  so  rewarded, 
to  be  publickly  printed  and  published,  within  two 
calendar  months. 

Any  opinion  advanced  in.  such  Essay,  contrary 
to  the  Church's  Articles,  with  respect  to  our 
Saviour's  Divinity,  and  the  personality  of  the 
Holy  Spirit,  shall  as  utterly  disqualify  a  Can- 
didate from  receiving  the  reward,  as  the  absurdity 
and  weakness  of  the  Composition  itself.  And 
whether  such  Essay  does  advance  such  opinion  or 
opinions,  is  left  to  the  opinion  of  them  who  are 
constituted  judges  of  the  merit  of  the  Essays. 

Grant  in  the  Common  Chest  of  the  University. 

NORRISIAN   PRIZE. 

1781.  The  Advantages  of  Revelation.     Jos.  Whiteley,  Magd. 

1782.  Jesus  Christ  considered  as  an  Example  to  mankind. 

\_Joseph  Whitcley,  Magdalene. 

1783.  The  Necessity  of  a  Redeemer.     Jos.  Whiteley,  Magd. 

1784.  The  Literary  Beauties  of  Scripture.     T.  Lloyd,  King's. 


400 

1785.  The  Rewards  of  Eternity.     Jos.  Whiteley,  Magdalene, 

1786.  The  Goodness  of  God,  as  manifested  in  the  Mission  of 

Jesus  Christ.     Edward  Pearson,  Sidney. 

1787.  The  Advantages  of  the  Knowledge  revealed  to  man- 

kind concerning  the  Holy  Spirit. 

\_Jos.  Whiteley,  Magdalene. 

1788.  Voluntary  Neglect  of  one  duty  cannot  be  compensated 

by  strictness  of  Attention  to  other  duties. 

\_Jos.  Whiteley,  Magdalene. 
178p.     When  the  fulness  of  the  time  was   come,  God  sent 

forth  his  Son.     Gal.  iv.  4.     Jos.  Whiteley,  Magd. 
1790.     The  manner,  in  which  the  Christian  Religion  was  in- 
tended to  improve  Morality.     Jos.  Leadley,  Magd. 
1791-     The  Propagation  of  the  Christian  Religion. 

fj.  Fawcett,  Magdalene. 

1792.  The  Old  Testament  is  not  contrary  to  the  New. 

[V.  Farvcett,  Magdalene. 

1793.  In  what  sense  Jesus  Christ  hath  "brought  Life  and 

Immortality  to  light  through  the  Gospel." 

[V.  Spencer  Cobbold,  Caius. 

179^.     The  Christian  Doctrine  of  Justification  by  Faith  is 
not  destructive  of  the  Principles  of  Natural  Virtue. 

[W.  Deason,  Trinity. 

1795.  The  Holy  Scriptures,  rightly  understood,  do  not  give 

encouragement  to  Enthusiasm  or  Superstition. 

[Thomas  Thomason,  Magd. 

1796.  The    Grounds   contained  in   Scripture  for  expecting 

a  future  Restoration  of  the  Jews.     C.  Jerram,  Magd. 
1797-     The  Advantages,  which  result  to  Revelation  from  it's 

being  conveyed  in  the  form  of  History. 

\_J.  Spencer  Cobbold,  Caius. 
1798.     The  state  of  the  Jews  since  the  death  of  Christ,  as 

affording  an  argument  for  the  truth  of  Christianity. 

[Andrew  Green,  Trinity. 
1799-     The   conduct  and  character  of  St.  Peter  considered, 

as  giving   evidence  to  the  truth  of  the  Christian 

Religion.     Thomas  Grimwood  Taylor,   Trinity. 


401 


1800.  The  Christian  Religion  has,  in  it's  effects,  been  favour- 

able to  human  happiness.     T.  Tkomason,  Queen's. 

1801.  The  difference  of  opinion  among  Christians  affords  no 

argument  against  Christianity.      T.  Thomason,  Qu. 

1802.  On  the  method  of  illustrating  the  Scriptures  from  the 

relations  of  modern  Travellers  in  Palestine,  and  the 
neighbouring  Countries.     J.  Foster,  Trinity. 

1803.  What  are  the  causes,  that  Christianity  spread  itself  so 

much  in  the  ages  immediately  succeeding  the  Age 
of  the  Apostles,  and  so  little  ever  since  ? 

\_James  Wilding,  Magd. 

1 804.  The  Providence  of  God.     J.  George  Durham,  Corpus. 

1805.  The  Internal  Evidence  of  the  Religion  of  Moses. 

[Thomas  Broadley,  Trinity. 

1806.  The  External  Evidence  of  the  Religion  of  Moses. 

[Thomas  Broadley,  Trinity. 

1807-     The  Fulness  of  the  time,  when  Christ  came  into  the 
World.     Thomas  Broadley,  Trinity. 

1808.  Public  Worship.     George  C.  Gorham,  Queen's. 

1809.  The  Christian  Sabbath.     W.  Bolland,jun.  Trinity. 

1810.  The  Connexion  between  Religion  and  Learning. 

[H.  Jeremy,  Trinity. 

1811.  The  divisions  of  Christians  are  not  inconsistent  with 

the  truths  of  Christianity.     J.  Taddy,  Trinity. 

1812.  The  conduct   of  the   Apostles   of  Christ    before   his 

Ascension  considered  in  itself,  and  in  comparison 
with  their  conduct  afterward.     C.  J.  Lyon,  Trin. 

1813.  The  Literary  Beauties  of  the  New  Testament. 

[_W.H.  Parry,  St.  John's. 

1814.  "The  Baptism  of  John,  was  it  from  Heaven,  or  of 

Men  ? "     James  C.  Franks,  Trinity. 

1815.  The  treachery  of  Judas,  and  the  failings  of  the  other 

Apostles,  are  consistent  with  the  Divine  Mission  of 
Jesus  Christ.     J.  W.  Bellamy,  Queen's. 

1816.  The  Use  and  Necessity  of  Revelation. 

\_James  C.  Franks,  Trinity. 

Cc 


402 


1817-  The  Internal  Evidence  of  the  Genuineness  and  Authen- 
ticity of  the  Gospels.  James  C.  Franks,  Trinity. 

1818.  What  confirmation  does  the  credibility  of  the  Gospel- 

History  derive  from  the  number  and  concurrence  of 
the  Evangelists  ?     James  C.  Franks,  Trinity. 

1819.  No  Valid  Argument  can  be  drawn  from  the  incredulity 

of  the   Jews   against  the   truth   of  the    Christian 
Religion.     Robert  Brough,  Corpus. 

1  820.  Shew,  from  a  review  of  the  Civil,  Moral,  and  Religious 
State  of  mankind  at  the  time  when  Christ  came  into 
the  World,  how  far  the  reception  which  his  Religion 
met  with  is  a  proof  of  its  Divine  Origin. 

\_Kenelm  Digby,  Trinity. 

1821.  The    Connexion  between   the  Jewish  and   Christian 

Dispensations.     W.  Trollope,  Pemb. 

1822.  The  Internal   Evidence  of  the  Divine  Origin  of  the 

Christian  Religion.     J.  A.  Jeremie,  Trinity. 
1  823.     The  Office  and  Mission  of  John  the  Baptist. 

|V.  A.  Jeremie,  Trin. 
1  824.     The  Doctrines  of  our  Saviour,  as  derived  from  the  four 

Gospels,  are  in  perfect  harmony  with  the  Doctrines 

of  St.  Paul,  as  derived  from  his  Epistles. 

£  J.  A.  Jeremie,  Trinity. 
1825.     No  valid  argument  can  be  drawn  from  the  incredulity 

of  the  Heathen  Philosophers  against  the  truth  of  the 

Christian  Religion.     J.  A.  Jeremie,  Trinity. 
1  826.     The  Mosaic  Dispensation  not  intended  to  be  perpetual. 

^Francis  White,  Trinity. 
1827-     The   Proofs   of  a   General   Judgment  to   come,   and 

the   Advantages   of   the    Knowledge    revealed    to 

Mankind  concerning  it. 


The  Rev.  JOHN  HULSE,  B.A.,  of  St.  John's 
College,  bequeathed  to  the  University  certain 
estates  for  the  advancement  of  Religious  Learning, 
and  directed  in  his  Will  that  out  of  the  rents 


403 


and  profits,  an  annual  premium  of  <£40.  should 
be  given  to  any  member  of  this  University,  under 
the  degree  or  standing  of  M.A.  who  composed 
the  best  Dissertation  in  the  English  language, 
on  the  Evidences  in  general,  or  on  the  Prophecies 
or  Miracles  in  particular,  or  on  any  other  par- 
ticular argument,  whether  the  same  be  direct  or 
collateral  proofs  of  the  Christian  Religion,  in  order 
to  evince  its  truth  and  excellence. 

The  subject  is  delivered  out  on  Christmas-day, 
or  New  Year's-day,  and  the  Dissertations  are  to 
be  sent  to  the  Vice-Chancellor,  or  the  Masters  of 
Trinity  and  St.  John's,  who  are  the  Trustees,  on 
or  before  the  1st  of  the  ensuing  November,  with 
the  names  of  the  respective  authors  sealed  up. 

The  writer  of  the  Dissertation  best  approved 
is  to  print  it  at  his  own  expence,  and  not  to  offer 
himself  a  second  time  as  Candidate  for  the  pre- 
mium. 

.* 

HULSEAN    PRIZE. 

1801.  The  Prophecies,  which  are  now  accomplishing,  are  an 

Evidence  of  the  truth  of  the  Christian  Religion. 

fJokn  Bird  Sumner,  King's. 

1802.  The  Internal  Evidences  of  the  truth  of  the  Christian 

Religion.     John  Scott,  Magd. 

1803.  The  External  Evidences  of  the  truth  of  the  Christian 

Religion. 

1804.  The  External  Evidences  of  the  truth  of  the  Christian 

Religion.     George  Downing  Whittington,  St.  John's. 

1805.  The  Propagation  of  Christianity.     R.  Morrilt,  Cath. 

C  C  2 


404 

1806.  The  Insufficiency  of  Secondary  Causes  to  insure  the 

success  of  Christianity.     S.  Berney  Vince,  King's. 

1807.  A  Critical  Essay  on  the  Ninth  Book  of  Bp.  Warburton's 

<  Divine  Legation  of  Moses.'    J.  N.  Pearson,  Trin. 

1808.  On  the  Origin  and  Intention  of  Sacrifices. 

[John  Cam  Hobhouse,  Trinity. 

1809-  On  the  Advantages  of  Difficulties  in  Religion,  in  order 
to  shew  the  good  effects  which  result  (or  which 
might  result)  from  the  proofs  of  revelation  being  of 
a  probable,  rather  than  of  a  demonstrative  kind. 

[WiUiam  Heath,  King's. 

1810.  The  remarkable  propensity  of  the  Jews  to  Idolatry 

before  the  Babylonish  Captivity,  compared  with 
their  exemption  from  it  in  general  afterward,  affords 
the  unbeliever  no  just  grounds  for  rejecting  the 
spiritual  account  of  the  Miracles  in  the  times  of 
Moses  and  Joshua.  William  Jorvett,  St.  John's. 

1811.  On  the  Books  of  Origen  against  Celsus,  with  a  view  to 

illustrate  the  argument ;    and    to    point    out   the 

evidence  they  afford  to  the  truth  of  Christianity, 

[Francis  Cunningham,  Queen's. 

1812.  On  the  religious  knowledge  which  the  Heathen  Philo- 

sophers derived  from  the  Jewish  Scriptures. 

[Daniel  Guilford  Wait,  St.  John's. 

1813.  On  the  Magi  who  came  to  adore  the  new-born  Jesus, 

and  on  the  Star  which  directed  their  way. 

[James  C.  Franks,  Trinity. 

1814.  On  the  comparative  value  of  Prophecy  and  Miracles,  as 

evidences  for  the  truth  of  Christianity. 

[Thomas  Fuller,  St.  John's. 

1815.  The  distinct  provinces  of  Reason  and  Faith. 

[Charles  J.  Lyon,  Trinity: 


405 


1816.     The  doctrine  of  the  Atonement  is  agreeable  to  Reason. 

[#.  C.  Boutflower,  St.  John's. 

1817-  The  probable  causes  of  the  apparent  Neglect,  with 
which  some  celebrated  ancient  writers  treated  the 
Christian  Religion.  John  Welter,  Emman. 

1818.  The  probable  influence  of  Revelation  on  the  writings  of 

Heathen  Philosophers,  and  on  the  morals  of  the 
Heathen  World.  William  Peach,  St.  John's. 

1819.  On  the  fitness  of  the  Time,  when  Christ  came  into 

the  World.     Edward  White,  Corpus. 

1820.  The  Importance  of  Natural  Religion. 

[Robert  Brougk,  Corpus. 

1821.  The  expedients  resorted  to  by  the  Gentile  Philosophers, 

in  opposing  the  Progress  of  the  Gospel,  described 
and  applied  in  illustration  of  the  truth  of  the 
Christian  Religion.  William  Trollope,  Pemb. 

1822.  The  Argument  for  the  Genuineness  of  the  Sacred 

Volume,  as  generally  received  by  Christians,  stated 
and  explained.  C.  Austin,  Jesus. 

1823.  The  Nature  and  Advantages  of  the  Influence  of  the 

Holy  Spirit.     William  Clayton  Walters,  Jesus. 

,  1824.     The  Nature  and  Advantage  of  the  Influence  of  the 
Holy  Spirit.     W.  C.  Walters,  Jesus. 

1825.  In  what  respects  the  Law  is  a  Schoolmaster  to  bring  us 

unto  Christ.     A.  T.  Russell,  St.  John's. 

1826.  A  Critical  Examination  of  our   Saviour's   Discourses 

with  regard  to  the  Evidences  which  they  afford  of 
His  Divine  Nature.  William  M.  Mayers,  Cath. 

1827-     The  Contention  between  Paul  and  Barnabas. 


406 


Botanical  Oarfccn. 

By  Indenture  25  Aug.  1762,  Dr.  Walker 
appointed  the  Chancellor,  or,  in  his  absence,  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  the  Master  of  Trinity  College, 
the  Provost  of  King's  College,  the  Master  of 
St.  John's  College,  and  the  Professor  of  Physic, 
perpetual  Governors  and  Visitors  of  the  Garden. 

They,  or  the  greater  part  of  them,  have  power 
to  elect  a  Reader  in  Botany,  and  a  Curator  or 
Superintendent  of  the  Garden,  and  to  appoint 
the  Persons  by  instruments  under  their  hands 
and  seals. 


for  tije 

They  are  appointed  by  a  Grace.  See  the 
Grace,  21  Jan.  1697,  Lib.  Graf.  Theta,  p.  428. 
Another,  Dec.  2.  1749,  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa, 
p.  123. 

A  Grace,  May  27,  1752,  grants  that  the 
major  part  of  the  Syndics  present  have  power 
to  transact  business,  provided  that  all  of  them 
have  had  notice  of  the  meeting,  and  that  the 
number  present  be  not  less  than  five,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  being  one  of  them.  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa, 
p.  184. 

11  Jun.  1782,  the  following  Grace  passed  for 
entrusting  the  Syndics  of  the  Press  with  the 
disposal  of  the  annual  sum  granted  to  the 


407 

University  by  an  Act  of  Parliament  21  Geo.  III. 
intitled,  An  Act  for  granting  to  his  Majesty, 
an  additional  duty  on  Almanacks,  &p. 

Cum  ad  graves  librorum  imprimendorum 
sumptus  sublevandos,  omnigenaque  adeo  eru- 
ditionis  studium  promovendum,  annuo  quingen- 
tarum  librarum  reditu  Academiam  nuper  auxerit 
munificentia  publica;  ne  aut  nostra  negligentia 
deflorescat  tantus  publice  habitus  literis  honos, 
aut  in  olios  usus  transferatur  quod  doctrines 
amplificandcE  sacrum  esse  oporteat; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  Typographici  Preli  Cura- 
tores  in  hac  etiam  parte  Syndici  vestri  constitu- 
antur ;  atque  ut  quingentce  quotannis  librte,  si 
ipsis  necessarium  videatur,  vel  in  novas  veterum 
scriptorum  editiones  apparandas,  vel  in  recen- 
tiorum  opera  divulganda  insumendce,  Us  hoc 
nomine  'e  Communi  Cista  erogentur :  Ita  tamen 
ut  singulis  annis,  ante  finem  mensis  Junii,  quic- 
quid  ab  Us  in  hujusce  negotii  procuratione  factum 
fuerit,  ad  vos  in  scripto  re/erre  teneantur.  Lib. 
Stat.  p.  445. 


For  the  supplying  this  and  certain  other 
Libraries  with  books,  provision  was  made  by 
Statute  of  the  8th  of  Queen, Anne,  entitled  an 
Act  for  the  Encouragement  of  Learning,  to  which 
certain  provisions  were  added  by  an  Act  of  the 
41st  of  George  II L  and  still  further  provisions 


408 

by  an  Act  passed  in  the  56th  year  of  the  same 
Reign,  in  which  last  it  is  enacted,  "  that  eleven 
printed  copies  of  the  whole  of  every  hook,  and 
of  every  volume  thereof,  upon  the  paper  upon 
which  the  largest  numher  or  impression  of  such 
hook  shall  he  printed  for  sale,  together  with  all 
maps  and  prints  belonging  thereto,  which,  from 
and  after  the  passing  of  this  Act,  shall  be  printed 
and  published,  on  demand  thereof  being  made 
in  writing  to,  or  left  at,  the  place  of  abode  of 
the  publisher  or  publishers  thereof,  at  any  time 
within  twelve  months  next  after  the  publication 
thereof,  under  the  hand  of  the  warehouse-keeper 
of  the  Company  of  Stationers,  or  the  Librarian 
or  other  person  thereto  authorized  by  the  persons 
or  body  politic  and  corporate,  proprietors  or  mana- 
gers of  the  Libraries  following;  videlicet,  the 
British  Museum,  Sion  College,  the  Bodleian 
Library  at  Oxford,  the  Public  Library  at  Cam- 
bridge, the  Library  of  the  faculty  of  Advocates 
at  Edinburgh,  the  Libraries  of  the  four  Uni- 
versities of  Scotland,  Trinity  College  Library, 
and  the  King's  Inns  Library  at  Dublin,  or  so 
many  of  such  eleven  copies  as  shall  be  respectively 
demanded  on  behalf  of  such  Libraries  respectively, 
shall  be  delivered  by  the  publisher  or  publishers 
thereof  respectively,  within  one  month  after  demand 
made  thereof  in  writing  as  aforesaid,  to  the  ware- 
house-keeper of  the  said  Company  of  Stationers 
for  the  time  being;  which  copies  the  said  ware- 
house-keeper shall  and  he  is  hereby  required  to 
receive  at  the  Hall  of  the  said  Company,  for  the 
use  of  the  Library  for  which  such  demand  shall 


409 

be  made,  within  such  twelve  months  as  aforesaid ; 
and  the  said  warehouse-keeper  is  hereby  required 
within  one  month  after  any  such  book  or  volume 
shall  be  so  delivered  to  him  as  aforesaid,  to  deliver 
the  same  for  the  use  of  such  Library:  and  if 
any  publisher,  or  the  warehouse-keeper  of  the 
said  Company  of  Stationers,  shall  not  observe  the 
directions  of  this  Act  therein,  that  then  he 
and  they  so  making  default  in  not  delivering 
or  receiving  the  said  eleven  printed  copies  as 
aforesaid,  shall  forfeit  besides  the  value  of  the 
said  printed  copies,  the  sum  of  five  pounds  for 
each  copy  not  so  delivered  or  received,  together 
with  the  full  costs  of  suit;  the  same  to  be 
recovered  by  the  person  or  persons,  or  body  politic 
or  corporate,  proprietors  or  managers  of  the 
Library  for  the  use  whereof  such  copy  or  copies 
ought  to  have  been  delivered  or  received;  for 
which  penalties  and  value  such  person  or  persons, 
body  politic  or  corporate,  is  or  are  now  hereby 
authorized  to  sue  by  action  of  debt  or  other 
proper  action  in  any  Court  of  Record  in  the 
United  Kingdom. 

"  And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  no  such 
printed  copy  or  copies  shall  be  demanded  by  or 
delivered  to  or  for  the  use  of  any  of  the  Libraries 
herein  before  mentioned,  of  the  Second  Edition, 
or  of  any  subsequent  edition  of  any  book  or  books, 
so  demanded  and  delivered  as  aforesaid,  unless 
the  same  shall  contain  additions  or  alterations: 
and  in  case  any  edition  after  the  first,  of  any 
book  so  demanded  and  delivered  as  aforesaid, 


410 


shall  contain  any  addition  or  alteration,  no  printed 
copy  or  copies  thereof  shall  be  demanded  or  de- 
livered as  aforesaid,  if  a  printed  copy  of  such 
additions  or  alterations  only,  printed  in  an  uniform 
manner  with  the  former  edition  of  such  book, 
be  delivered  to  each  of  the  Libraries  aforesaid, 
for  whose  use  a  copy  of  the  former  edition  shall 
have  been  demanded  and  delivered  as  aforesaid: 
provided  also,  that  the  copy  of  every  book  that 
shall  be  demanded  by  the  British  Museum,  shall 
be  delivered  of  the  best  paper  on  which  such 
work  shall  be  printed." 

To  the  same  purpose  the  rents  of  the  Uni- 
versity's estates  at  Ovingdon  in  Norfolk  are 
applied.  This  estate  was  bought  with  the  money 
given  to  the  University  in  1666,  by  Tobias 
Ilustat,  Esq.  Yeoman  of  the  Robes  to  King 
Charles  II.,  to  be  laid  out  in  land,  the  rents 
to  be  applied  in  the  purchase  of  choice  books 
for  the  Public  Library. 

William  Worts,  M.A.  Fellow  of  Caius  College, 
formerly  one  of  the  Esquire  Bedells  of  this  Uni- 
versity, ordered  by  his  Will  that  the  annual 
surplus  of  the  rents  and  profits  of  his  estate  at 
Landbeach,  in  this  county,  after  the  discharge 
of  the  other  outgoings,  (See  p.  271.)  should  be 
applied  to  the  use  of  the  Public  Library.  A 
quarterly  contribution  of  one  shilling  and  sixpence 
from  each  Member  of  the  University,  excepting 
Sizars,  is  likewise  made  for  the  support  of  the 
Library. 


411 


The  management  of  the  Library  is  committed 
to  Syndics,  who  are  the  Vice-Chancellor,  the 
Heads  of  Colleges,  all  Doctors  in  each  Faculty, 
the  Orator,  and  all  public  Professors,  the  Proctors, 
and  Scrutators.  They  meet  in  the  Library  on 
the  first  Monday  after  the  division  of  every  Term, 
and  oftener  if  necessary;  and  to  them,  or  the 
major  part,  not  less  than  five,  of  whom  the 
Vice-Chancellor  must  always  be  one,  full  powers 
are  committed  for  the  better  regulating  of  the 
same. 

All  Members  of  the  Senate,  and  Bachelors  in 
Civil  Law  and  Physic,  are  entitled  to  the  use 
of  the  Library. 

The  Syndics  have  at  various  times  issued 
regulations  to  the  following  effect: — 

"  That  no  person  be  allowed  to  have  in  his 
possession  at  any  one  time,  more  than  ten  volumes 
belonging  to  the  Library,  except  by  a  dispensation 
from  the  Vice-Chancellor  and  the  Librarians, 
if  they  shall  be  unanimously  of  opinion  that 
sufficient  reasons  have  been  assigned  for  the 
same;  and  that  such  dispensations  continue  in 
force  no  longer  than  to  the  end  of  the  quarter 
in  which  they  shall  be  granted;  but  upon  fresh 
application  may  be  renewed  by  the  same  au- 
thority. 

"  That  no  one  take  or  borrow  any  book  out  of 
the  Library,  without  first  delivering  to  one  of 
the  Library-Keepers  a  note  for  the  same,  in  his 
own  hand-writing,  expressing  his  name  and  Col- 


412 

lege,  and  the  year  and  day  of  the  month  on 
which  such  book  is  taken  or  borrowed,  on  pain 
of  forfeiting  five  pounds,  or  double  the  value  of 
such  book,  at  the  discretion  and  the  judgment  of 
the  Vice-Chancellor. 

"  That  the  Library-Keepers  preserve  carefully 
all  such  notes,  till  the  book  so  taken  out  be 
returned  again  to  the  Library,  duly  entering 
the  same  in  a  book  to  be  kept  for  that  purpose, 
together  with  the  day  of  the  said  return,  and 
any  damage  done  to  any  book,  on  pain  of  five 
shillings  for  every  omission,  to  be  paid  by  them, 
or  any  of  them. 

"  That  every  one  who  shall  borrow  or  take 
any  book  out  of  the  Library,  return  it  thither 
again  on  or  before  the  next  of  the  four  following 
days,  viz.  Michaelmas-day,  St.  Thomas,  Lady- 
day,  and  Midsummer-day,  or  oftener,  if  the  Syndics 
see  occasion  and  require  it,  under  the  penalty 
of  two  shillings  for  every  folio  or  quarto,  and 
one  shilling  for  every  book  of  less  size ;  the  penalty 
to  be  repeated  every  month  till  the  book  be 
returned,  or  another  of  the  same  edition  and 
equal  value  placed  in  its  room. 

"  That  a  list  of  the  books  omitted  to  be  re- 
turned at  the  end  of  the  quarter,  together  with 
the  name  of  the  borrower,  be  suspended  in  some 
public  place  in  the  Library. 

"  That  no  person  shall  have  more  than  five 
volumes  out  of  the  lock-up  classes  of  the  Library, 
by  a  note  counter-signed  by  the  Vice-Chancellor ; 


413 

and  that  such  books  be  returned  at  the  end  of 
each  quarter,  as  all  other  books  are,  under  double 
penalties. 

"  That  for  the  purpose  of  allowing  the 
Librarians  sufficient  time  to  inspect  the  books 
at  the  end  of  each  quarter,  all  books  be  kept  in 
the  Library  on  the  day  appointed  for  their 
return,  and  the  whole  of  the  day  following. 

"  That  no  manuscript  whatever  be  taken  out 
of  the  Library,  without  a  grace  for  its  removal 
being  obtained  from  the  Senate. 

"  That  no  volume  containing  a  collection  of 
prints  or  drawings,  shall  be  taken  out  of  the 
Library  on  any  account  whatever. 

"  That  every  year,  on  the  Friday  next  after 
the  Commencement,  or  oftener  if  they  see  occasion, 
the  Syndics  shall  meet  in  the  Senate-House, 
or  elsewhere,  at  the  appointment  of  the  Vice- 
Chancellor,  to  give  orders  and  appoint  inspectors, 
for  a  general  survey  of  the  Library  the  Monday 
following.  These  inspectors,  with  the  Librarians, 
shall  make  a  full  and  true  catalogue  of  all  books 
wanting  or  much  damaged,  expressing  in  whose 
custody  such  books  are,  or  by  whom  damaged, 
and  deliver  the  same,  signed  by  them,  to  the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

"  That  all  books  in  this  catalogue  be  returned 
to  the  Library  perfect  and  undamaged,  or  others 
of  the  same  edition  and  equal  value,  placed  in 
their  room  there  within  thirty  days  after  notice 


414 


given,  on  pain  of  forfeiting  five  pounds  for  every 
volume  not  so  returned,  or  the  full  value  of 
the  same,  at  the  discretion  and  in  the  judgment 
of  the  Vice-Chancellor,  to  be  paid  by  him  who 
stands  charged  with  it;  or,  in  case  no  one  shall 
be  charged  with  it,  by  the  Library-Keepers, 
or  their  Deputies,  or  any  of  them;  unless  it 
shall  appear  to  the  Vice- Chancellor  that  such 
loss  or  damage  has  not  happened  through  any 
neglect  or  default  of  the  said  Library-Keepers, 
or  their  Deputies, 

"  That  if,  after  the  said  thirty  days,  on  inquiry 
and  report  to  be  made  by  the  said  inspectors,  or 
otherwise,  it  appears  to  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
that  any  books  be  still  wanting  in  the  Library, 
or  much  damaged,  he  shall  order  others,  without 
delay,  to  be  procured,  at  the  expence  of  the 
Public  Chest,  and  put  in  their  places. 

"  That  strangers  or  persons  in  statu  pupillari 
may  be  admitted  into  the  Library,  if  attended 
by  one  of  the  Library-Keepers,  or  accompanied 
by  some  Member  of  the  University  not  under 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Law  or  Medicine, 
and  not  otherwise. 

1  That  all  the  penalties  above-mentioned  shall 
be  levied  as  other  penalties  are,  by  the  Queen's 
Statutes,  (Stat.  Eli%.  50.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  271.)  and 
go  one-third  to  the  Bedells  who  collect  them,  the 
rest  to  the  Public  Chest." 


415 

The  Library  is  closed  on  Sundays,  and  on  the 
following  days;  Christmas-Day;  the  Epiphany; 
the  Purification ;  Ash- Wednesday ;  Good  Friday ; 
Easter  Monday  and  Tuesday;  Holy  Thursday; 
Whit  Monday  and  Tuesday ;  November  5.  Ap- 
pointed Fast  days  and  Thanksgivings ;  the  day 
after  each  Quarter-day;  and  the  Wednesday, 
Thursday,  Friday,  and  Saturday,  in  the  week 
after  the  Commencement. 

On  Saturdays  it  is  open  from  ten  till  one ; 
on  Saints'  days  from  twelve  till  three;  and  on 
other  days  from  ten  till  three. 


manner  of  malting  Appeal*,  anD  of  ctjoosimj 


In  University  Causes,  the  Vice-Chancellor  is 
usually   the  Judge.     In    some    cases    the    Com- 
missary is   Judge.     Stat.   Eliz.  48.      De  causis 
forensibus.     Lib.  Stat.  p.  259- 

An  appeal  lies  from  the  Commissary's  sentence 
to  the  Vice-Chancellor. 

It  must  be  made  within  twenty-four  hours 
after  the  sentence  is  pronounced.  Ibid. 

An  appeal  lies  from  the  sentence  of  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  (whether  the  cause  began  before  him, 
or  devolved  to  him  by  appeal)  to  the  University; 


416 

that  is,  to  Delegates  chosen  in  the  manner  to  be 
mentioned  afterwards. 

It  must  be  made  before  the  Vice-Chancellor, 
within  two  days  after  his  sentence  was  pronounced 
(ibid),  a  Public  Notary  being  present  \. 

The  Person,  immediately  after  his  appeal  is 
made,  takes  an  oath,  before  the  Vice-Chancellor 
(who  is  called  the  Judex  a  quo)  quod  in  conscientia 
sua  justam  habet  appellandi  causam.  Grat. 
13  Feb.  1593.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  363. 

He  also  takes  an  oath,  that,  neque  directe, 
neque  indirecte,  neque  per  se9  neque  per  quempiam 
alium,  Septemviros,  apud  quos  potestas  est,  De- 
legatos  Judices  nominandi,  solicitet  ad  assig- 
nandum  aliquem  Delegatum,  sed  ipsorum  arbitrio 
talem  nominationem  libere  permittet.  Ibid. 

If  he  have  any  advocate,  Patron  or  Proctor, 
he  takes  the  same  oaths2. 

The  Appellant  within  three  days  after  the 
Vice-Chancellor's  sentence,  gives  notice  to  one 
of  the  Proctors  of  his  having  appealed.  Stat. 
Eliz.  48.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  259. 


1  If  the  sentence  from  which  you  do  appeal  be  inter- 
locutory, you  must  appeal  in  scriptis,  before  some  Public 
Notary:  if  it  be  definitive,  you  may  appeal  apud  acta. 
Tabor's  Book,  p.  13. 

1  Tabor  says  the  Oaths  are  to  be  taken  after  the  inhibition 
of  the  Vice-Chancellor. 


417 


Tabor  says,  you  are  to  take  the  Registrary, 
or  a  Public  Notary,  with  you,  to  make  an  act 
of  that  which  is  done. 

The  Appellant  deposits  twenty  shillings  in 
the  hands  of  the  Proctor,  to  be  returned  if  it  be 
proved  that  he  had  just  cause  for  appealing ;  but 
to  go  to  the  University  if  he  be  convicted  of 
having  appealed  temere  or  gives  up  the  prosecution 
after  judges  have  been  appointed,  or  if  the  cause 
have  been  delayed  by  his  fault.  Ibid. 

He  likewise  deposits  two  shillings,  as  a  present 
to  the  Proctor.  1  bid. 

The  Proctor  immediately  inhibits  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  ne  quid  pendente  appettatione  atten- 
tare,  vel  innovare  prcesumat.  Ibid5. 

The  Person  who  promoted  the  suit  against 
the  Appellant  (who  is  called  pars  appellata)  and 
his  Proctor,  &c.  (if  he  have  any)  take,  before  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  the  oath  quod  neque  directe, 
neque  indirecte,  &p.  Grace,  1593. 

The  Party  Appellant,  or  his  Counsel,  is  to 
solicit  the  Vice-Chancellor  to  call  a  Congregation, 
if  it  be  Term  time,  or  a  Convocation,  if  it  be 


9  In  the  case  of  Dr.  Ewin,  the  inhibition  was  attested 
thus: 

In  the  presence  of  me,  GEORGE  BURLASE, 

Not9.  Pub.  and  Registrary. 
D  D 


418 

out  of   Term,    for  the   choosing    of   Delegates. 
Tabor's  Book*,  p.  151. 

At  the  Congregation  a  Bedell  calls  the  Re- 
gents and  Non-Regents,  and  the  Vice-Chancellor 
mentions  the  business  to  be  done. 

The  Senior  Proctor  in  his  place  reads  the 
41th  Statute  De  causis  forensibus 5. 

The  Electors  of  the  Delegates  are  the  five 
Persons  of  the  Caput,  and  the  two  Proctors. 
Stat.  Eli%.  48. 

They  go  to  the  Vice-Chancellor's  table,  and 
nominate  and  prick  for  the  Delegates,  who  are 
to  be  three  at  least,  and  not  more  than  five, 
pro  qualitate  causa.  Ibid. 

The  Persons  who  are  pricked  by  the  greater 
number  of  the  Electors,  are  to  be  proposed  to 
the  Senate.  Ibid. 

After  the  nomination  and  pricking,  the  fol- 
lowing Grace,  prepared  by  the  Registrary,  is 
read  in  both  Houses 6,  in  two  Congregations : 


4  If  there  be  any  thing  besides  to  be  done  at  that  Con- 
gregation,   the    choosing    Delegates    is    done    last.      Buck's 
Book. 

6  According  to  an  account  in  Baker's  MSS.  Vol.  xlii. 
p.  113,  the  Proctor  reads  also  the  Statute  (Grace)  made  1593. 
But  this  is  not  mentioned  in  Buck's  Book. 

5  This  Grace   has  not  unfrequently  been  read    in    one 
Congregation  only. 


419 

Judices  Delegati  in  causa  Appettationis  inter 
A.  B.  Partem  Appettantem,  et  C.  D.  Partem 
Appellatam,  electi  et  dati  sunt 


E. 
F. 
G. 


Placeat  Vobis,  ut  prcedicti  Viri  E.  F.  G. 
.sint  judices  Delegati,  in  pr&dicta  Appellationis 
causa. 

With  respect  to  non  placets,  the  Statute 
orders  as  follows: 

Potestas  nominandi  Judices  sit  penes  quinque 
illos  Viros  qui  pro  Capite  illius  anni  constitute 
sunt,  et  duos  Procuratores :  et  qui  a  majori  parte 
istorum  nominati  fuerint,  ad  Regentes  et  Non- 
Regentes  deferentur,  suffragiis  suis  eligendi,  si 
placent  eis ;  alioqui,  mutatis  uno  vel  altero,  alii 
eorum  loco  per  dictos  Septemviros  surrogati 
proponentur  eligendi.  Et  si  hi  quoque  displicent9 
similiter  tertio  fiet.  Quod  si  nee  tertio  loco  positi 
eligantur,  licebit  dictis  Septemviris,  aut  eorum 
majori  parti,  pro  ilia  vice  tantum,  Delegatos 
Judices  eligere  et  dare. 

Suppose  one  or  two  of  them  named  in  the 
Grace  be  disliked  in  either  House,  the  Septemviri 
then  are  to  put  out  their  names  and  put  in  others; 
and  this  may  be  done  three  several  times. 

But  in  case  the  Grace  be  then  denied,  licebit 
dictis  Septemmris,  aut  eorum  majori  parti,  pro 


420 

ilia  vice  tantum,  Delegates  Judices  eligere  et 
dare,  as  doth  appear  in  the  Statute  aforenamed. 
Buck's  Book. 

If  the  greater  part  of  the  Septemviri  do  not 
agree  in  the  Nomination  or  Election  (when  the 
Election  devolves  to  them)  of  the  Persons,  then 
they  are  to  be  Delegates,  who  have  the  votes  of 
the  greater  number  of  Electors,  though  they  do 
not  make  a  majority,  or  an  equality,  with  respect 
to  the  whole  number.  Stat.  48. 

By  the  48th  Statute  —  Causa  Appellationum 
ad  Universitatem  ultra  decem  dies,  si  fieri  potent, 
post  datos  Judices  non  potrahantur.  See  the 
Interpretation,  30  Apr.  1582,  Lib.  Stat.  p.  326. 

The  Party  Appellant  goes  to  each  of  the 
Delegates,  desiring  them  to  meet.  Tabor's  Book, 
p.  13. 

When  they  are  met  together,  he  presents  the 
Grace  to  them,  as  it  passed  in  the  Senate-House7. 
And  when  they  have  read  it,  they  consent  accep- 
tare  in  se  onus  Commissions,  and  declare  them- 
selves willing  and  ready  to  perform  the  Office 
of  Judges  in  that  Cause,  juxta  tenorem  Delega- 
tionis.  Tabor,  p.  15. 

After  acceptation  made,  the  Party  Appellant, 
or  his  Proctor,  doth  desire  the  Judges  Delegate 
that  they  would  decree,  Partem  Appellatam 
arrestandam  fore,  citra  diem  abitrio  eorum  as- 
signandum,  to  answer  unto  such  things  which 

7  Regent  House.     Tabor,  p.  15. 


421 

the   Party   Appellant   will    object    against    him. 
Tabor,  p.  15. 

If  the  Party  Appellate  doth  then  appear,  the 
Cause  is  declared  on  both  sides,  and  the  Party 
Appellant  hath  assigned  him  ad  proponendum 
in  forma  the  next  Court  day,  wherein  such 
gravamina  for  which  he  did  appeal,  must  be 
specified.  Ibid. 

The  Delegates  are  obliged  (in  quibuscunque 
forensibus  controversiis)  to  end  the  Cause  within 
forty  days  next  after  the  inhibition,  unless 
the  delay  be  owing  to  the  Appellant,  in  which 
case  the  Appeal  is  void,  and  to  be  held  deserted. 
Gr.  13  Feb.  1593.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  363. 

tiTomfiinatum  ilaprtd. 

The  order  in  which  Persons  are  to  preach  is 
made  out  by  the  Bedells,  and  signed  by  the 
Vice-Chancellor,  twice8  in  the  year. 

The  first  paper  begins  from  the  first  Sunday 
in  January ;  the  second  from  the  first  Sunday  in 
August. 

There  are  two  columns. 

The  first  column  is  the  Prior  Combinatio,  and 
contains  the  order  for  Sunday  mornings. 

8  The  Butlers  of  the  respective  Colleges  are  required, 
on  or  before  the  first  of  June,  and  the  first  of  December, 
in  each  year,  to  deliver  to  the  University  Marshall  a  list, 
signed  by  the  proper  Officers  of  the  College,  of  all  the  names 
on  their  boards,  except  those  of  Persons  in  Statu  Pupillari. 


422 

It  is  regulated  in  the  following  manner : 

King's  College  provides  a  Preacher  every 
seventh  turn ;  Trinity  and  St.  John's  Colleges, 
each  of  them  do  the  same. 

The  particular  Persons  of  these  three  Colleges 
who  are  to  preach,  are  not  mentioned  in  the  paper. 

The  other  Colleges  (Trinity  Hall,  and 
Downing,  which  provide  no  Preacher,  excepted) 
are  divided  into  Classes : 

PRIOR   COMBINATIO. 

1.  Coll.  Regal. 

2.  Coll.  Trin. 

3.  Coll.  Job. 

|Coll.  Pet.  rColl.  Regin. 

4.  |  Coll.  Christ.  5.  JAul.  Pemb. 

iColl.  Magd.  lAul.  Cath. 

rColl.  Corp.  Christi.  (Coll.  Caii. 

6.  JAuLClar.  7.  jColl.  Jes. 

CColl.  Sid.  (-Coll.  Emman. 

Each  of  the  Classes  provides  a  Preacher  for 
every  seventh  morning  turn. 

The  particular  Preacher  of  each  Class  is  fixed 
by  Seniority,  reckoning  Bachelors  of  Divinity 
first,  and  then  Masters  of  Arts. 

But  Persons  of  sixty  years  of  age,  and  upwards, 
are  excused  from  preaching,  and  from  all  other 
exercises  (excepting  for  degrees),  and  Masters  of 
Arts  are  not  in  the  Combination  Paper  for 


423 

sermons,    till  they  are  of   one    year's    standing 
complete. 

If  the  day  before  the  Term  begins,  fall  on 
a  Sunday,  or  any  other  holy  day,  there  is  a 
Clerum,  and  the  morning  turn  drops. 

If  a  Person's  turn  happen  on  Easter-Day,  or 
Whit-Sunday,  in  the  morning,  the  usage  is,  to 
put  him  into  the  paper  for  the  afternoon  of 
the  same  day. 

The  same  thing  is  done  when  Christmas-Day 
falls  on  a  Sunday. 

If  the  eighth  day  of  May  fall  on  a  Sunday, 
there  is  a  Clerum  in  the  morning,  and  the  morning 
turn  drops. 

The  Sermons  on  the  30th  of  January,  the 
29th  of  May,  the  5th  of  November,  and  on  the 
day  of  the  King's  Accession,  are  preached  by 
Masters  of  Colleges,  or  Doctors  in  Divinity,  who 
are  not  Masters,  or  their  Deputies:  viz.  those 
on  the  5th  of  November,  and  the  30th  of  January 
by  Masters  of  Colleges,  and  those  on  the  29th  of 
May,  and  the  King's  Accession,  by  Doctors  in 
Divinity. 

If  the  30th  of  January  fall  on  a  Sunday,  the 
fast  is  observed  on  the  day  next  following. 

If  the  29th  of  May,  the  5th  of  November, 
or  the  King's  Accession,  be  on  a  Sunday,  the 
Person's  turn  in  the  morning  drops. 

On  Lady  Day,  in  the  morning,  the  sermon  is 
at  King's  College  Chapel,  and  is  preached  by  one 


424 

of  the  Society  there.     The  Person's  turn  at  St. 
Mary's  drops. 

On  Ash- Wednesday,  in  the  morning,  there  is 
generally  a  Clerum  preached,  at  the  appointment 
of  the  Vice-Chancellor,  by  one  of  the  Persons 
who  is  to  commence  Doctor  or  Bachelor  in  Di- 
vinity in  the  year,  as  an  exercise  for  the  degree. 
If  there  be  no  Clerum,  there  is  a  Supplication. 

On  Easter-Tuesday,  the  University  Sermon  is 
at  St.  Benedict's  Church. 

It  is  preached  by  the  Person  mentioned  in  the 

Combination  Paper. 

:K-Vriift. 
Preachers  for  the  Lent  and  Summer  Assizes, 

and  for   extraordinary   fasts,    and  thanksgivings, 
are  appointed  by  the  Vice-Chan cellor. 

On  the  Commemoration  Sunday  next  before 
the  third  day  of  November,  in  the  morning,  and 
in  the  morning  and  the  afternoon  of  the  Com- 
mencement Sunday,  the  Preachers  are  appointed 
by  the  Vice-Chancellor,  and  the  Preachers  in 
course  are  inserted  in  the  paper  for  the  next 
Sunday. 

The  second  column  of  the  Combination  Paper, 
called  Posterior  Combinatio,  contains  the  names 
of  the  Preachers  on  Sunday  afternoons,  and  on 
other  holidays.  They  are  Bachelors  in  Divinity 
and  Masters  of  Arts,  who  take  their  turns  ac- 
cording to  Seniority,  if  in  orders ;  the  Bachelors 
of  Divinity  being  first  in  the  order. 


425 

Masters  of  Arts  are  not  in  this  column,  till 
they  are  of  one  year's  standing  complete. 

There  are  two  sermons  on  each  of  the  follow- 
ing holidays,  viz.  Lady  Day,  Ascension  Day, 
Michaelmas  Day,  All  Saints'  Day. 

Those  Persons  who  do  not  intend  to  preach 
in  their  turns  must  provide  Substitutes9.  A  Sub- 
stitute who  has  not  been  in  the  Combination 
Paper,  must  have  leave  of  the  Vice-Chancellor 
to  preach. 

N.B.  Persons  who  have  declared  for  Law 
or  Physic,  are  not  on  that  account  exempted  from 
preaching  in  their  turns  at  St.  Mary's  Church. 

9  SELECT  PREACHERS. 

Quum  Sacris  Concionibus  in  Templo  Academiae  habendis  baud 
satis  provisum  videatur : 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  ii  qui  pro  ratione  senioritatis  diebus  Domi- 
nlcis  post  meridiem  condones  habere  tenentur,  neminem  sibi 
vicarium  ab  initio  Octobris  proxime  sequentis  usque  ad  Jinem 
Junii  adsciscant,  nisi  aliquem  e  selectis  Concionatoribus  mox 
designandis. 

Placeat  etiam  Vobis,  ut  novem  selecti  Concionatores  a  Pro- 
Cancellario,  Regio  Theologies  Prqfessore,  Professore  Norrisiano, 
Procuratoribus  aut  eorum  vices  gerentibus3  si  qui  sint,  vel  saltern 
tribus  eorum  consentientibus,  quorum  unus  semper  sit  Pro- 
Cancellarius,  singuli  in  singulas  menses  proedictos  eligantur. 
Ita  tamen  ut  dictis  Concionatoribus  vices  suas  inter  sese  pro 
arbitrio  permutare  liceat.  Atque  ut  Electio  Jiat  ante  Jinem  in- 
stantis  Termini.  Denique  ut  si  quis  hoc  munus  sibi  delatum  detrec- 
taverit,  alms,  quamprimumjieri  possit,  in  ejus  locum  subrogetur. 
Lect.  et  Concess.  5  Julii  1802.  GEO.  BORLASE,  Regist. 


426 


By  Stat.  Eliz.  26.  Lib.  Stat  p.  237-  there  is 
to  be  a  Divinity  Act  (which  is  called  a  course 
Act)  every  second  Thursday  in  each  Term. 

If  the  course  day  be  a  Holiday,  the  Act  is 
deferred  till  the  Thursday  fortnight  following. 

The  Respondents  are  taken  from  the  Masters 
of  Arts  of  four  years'  standing  complete,  in  the 
order  of  their  Seniority. 

Masters  of  Arts  are  excepted  who  have  de- 
clared for  Law  or  Physic1. 

Persons  of  sixty  years  of  age,  or  more,  are 
exempted  from  all  course  exercises. 

There  are  three  Opponents  to  each  Act,  who 
are  appointed  in  the  same  manner  as  the  morning 
Preachers  at  St.  Mary's. 

Persons  are  liable  to  be  appointed  Opponents 
as  soon  as  they  are  Masters  of  Arts. 

Persons,  who  have  declared  for  Law  or  Physic, 
are  exempted  from  Opponencies. 

Persons  neglecting  to  keep  their  course  Acts 
are  fined,  for  the  first  omission,  forty  shillings, 


1  Masters  of  Arts  intending  to  be  on  the  Physic-lines 
make,  by  themselves  or  another,  their  declaration,  before 
the  Vice-Chancellor.  The  Registrary  is  present,  and  notes  it 
in  his  book. 


427 


for  the  second,  three  pounds,  for  every  subsequent 
omission  five  pounds.  During  such  omissions 
there  is  no  Act  on  the  usual  days. 

An  Opponent  neglecting  to  keep  in  his  turn, 
forfeits  ten  shilling  for  each  omission,  to  be 
repeated  till  he  has  kept  it  or  procured  some 
other  Master  of  Arts  to  keep  it  for  him. 

If  any  one  from  ill  health,  or  unavoidable 
absence  from  the  University,  is  unable  to  keep 
his  course  Act,  a  Grace  for  excusing  him  is  usually 
offered  to  the  Senate,  and  his  name  is  mentioned 
in  the  Combination  Paper  as  being  to  keep,  cum 
convaluerit,  cum  redierit,  8$c. 

So  many  Acts  are  now  kept  by  Persons  about 
to  take  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Divinity  by 
Stat.  9.  Eliz.  that  those  whose  names  stand  in 
the  Combination  Paper,  are  seldom  called  upon 
to  keep  their  Acts. 

It  sometimes  happens,  when  the  course  days 
are  all  engaged,  and  a  Person  is  anxious  to  keep 
his  Act,  that  the  Professor  allows  a  private  Act, 
at  which  the  Father  of  the  College  usually 
presides,  unless  the  Respondent  can  prevail  on 
some  Doctor  in  Divinity  to  moderate. 

He  is  to  procure  three  Persons  to  oppose 
him. 


428 


In  the  Combination  Paper  one  or  two  names 
are  put  down  for  Respondents,  and  two  Opponents 
are  assigned  to  each  of  them.  But  the  course 
Acts  are  now  never  kept ;  the  Disputations  in 
the  Law  and  Physic  Schools,  being  generally 
Exercises  for  degrees. 


on  account  of  tfjc  £)ratij  of  a  iirstdcnt 
filrmucr  of  tfje 


The  Non-Term  is  only  for  Persons  who  die 
in  the  University.  Stat.  Antiq.  Lib.  Stat.  p.  83. 

By  the  same  Statute,  the  cessation  from 
Lectures  and  Disputations,  was  from  the  death 
of  a  Regent  or  Non-  Regent,  to  the  burial.  But 
by  a  decree  1619,  (Lib.  Stat.  p.  477)  the  Non- 
Term  is  to  continue  for  the  three  days  only. 

The  present  proceedings  seem  to  be  thus  : 

The  Vice-Chancellor  is  waited  upon  by  one 
of  the  College  to  which  the  deceased  belonged, 
for  the  purpose  of  appointing  the  time  for  ringing 
St.  Mary's  bell. 

He  usually  fixes  upon  the  night  before  the 
funeral.  The  bell  rings  for  an  hour.  Regularly 
the  bell-ringer  receives  his  notice  to  ring  the  bell 
from  the  Vice-Chancellor. 


429 


If  the  corpse  be  removed  from  the  University 
for  burial,  the  bell  is  usually  rung  on  the  day 
before  the  removal. 

Graces  have  often  been  passed  at  a  Convoca- 
tion, for  deferring  the  Non-Term,  on  account  of 
University  business: 

1688.  May  it  please  you  that  this  Convocation 
be  turned  into  a  Congregation,  and  that  the  \%th, 
13th,  and  \kth  days  of  this  month  of  June,  may  be 
Non-Term  for  the  death  of  Dr.  Widdrington. 
Lib.  Grat.  Theta,  p.  302. 

1688.  Cum  gratia  hodie  concessa  fuit,  ut  12, 
13,  14,  hujus  instantis  mensis  Junii  sint  pro  Non- 
Termino,  pro  morte  Doctoris  Widdrington ; 

Placeat  Vobis,  ut  idem  Non-Terminus  trium 
dierum  differatur  in  19,  20,  et  21  diem  hujus 
mensis.  Lib.  Grat.  Theta,  p.  302. 

June  28,  1688.  May  it  please  you  that  this 
Convocation  be  turned  into  a  Congregation,  and 
that  this  day,  and  to-morrow,  be  Term,  and  that 
the  I5tk  and  I6th  of  November  next  be  Non- 
Term  for  the  death  of  Dr.  Cudworth.  Lib.  Grat. 
Theta,  p.  302. 

1765,  Read  and  granted  Jan.  12. 

May  it  please  you  that  this  Convocation  be 
immediately  turned  into  a  Congregation,  and  that 
the  Non-Term  for  the  death  of  Dr.  Newcome, 
late  Master  of  St.  John's,  be  deferred  to  Monday 
the  21st  day  of  this  month.  Lib.  Grat.  Kappa, 
p.  407. 


430 

June  11,  1760. — That  the  Non-Term  for  the 
death  of  Dr.  Chapman  be  superseded  till  the 
Congregation  this  afternoon  shall  be  ended.  Lib. 
Grat.  Kappa,  p.  379. 

Upon  the  death  of  a  Doctor,  or  Master  of 
Arts,  there  is  to  be  Non-Term  only  as  to 
Lectures  and  Disputations,  not  as  to  Congrega- 
tions ;  ( Vid.  the  Decree  about  it 2,  and  the  old 
Statute  de  exequiis5,  to  which  it  refers)  yet  the 
custom  is  to  call  a  Convocation  upon  occasion  in 
that  case,  and  by  a  Grace  to  turn  it  into  a  Con- 
gregation, which  I  think  needless.  Baker's  MSS. 
Vol.  xlii.  p.  151. 

On  account  of  the  extreme  inconvenience  to 
public  business  this  practice  seems  falling  into 
disuse. 

ifompounlrm. 

All  Persons  shall  be  reputed  and  reckoned 
as  Compounders,  who,  before  admission  to  their 
Degree,  or  their  Creation,  shall  have  presentation 
to,  collation,  institution,  induction,  or  any  manner 
of  possession  of,  any  Living  or  Livings  Eccle- 
siastical, of  what  kind  soever,  which  shall  be 
rated  to  the  yearly  value  of  forty  marks  in 
the  book  of  first-fruits,  or  subsidy.  Interpr.  1599. 
Lib.  Stat.  p.  329. 

It  is  said  that  although  the  Person  be  not 
already  presented,  yet  if  the  Living  be  vacant, 

-  An.  1619.     Lib.  Stat.  p.  417-  5  Lib.  Stat,  p.  83. 


431 

and  if  he  take  the  Degree  to  qualify  him  to 
hold  it,  it  is  reckoned  the  same  as  if  he  were 
already  in  possession  of  it. 

If  Livings  be  discharged,  their  values  are 
estimated  from  the  tenths  mentioned  in  the  book 
of  first-fruits  :  and  if  they  be  not  mentioned  there, 
they  are  estimated  according  to  their  reputed 
value. 

Persons  compound  for  endowed  Chapels,  if  they 
be  of  the  yearly  value  of  £26.  13s.  kd\ 

For  two  or  more  Livings,  or  other  pieces 
of  Ecclesiastical  preferment,  the  joint  values  of 
which,  as  rated  in  the  book  of  first-fruits,  amount 
to 


Two  or  more  pieces  of  Ecclesiastical  preferment, 
if  they  be  not  rated  in  the  King's  Book,  are  rated 
according  to  their  real  values. 

An  estate,  annuity,  or  certain  income  for 
life,  by  whatever  tenure  possessed,  whether  in 
the  Person's  own  right,  that  of  his  Wife,  or 
any  other  Person,  if  of  the  annual  amount  of 
4d.  makes  a  Compounder. 


Persons  taking  a  Degree  per  saltum,  pay  the 
Composition  money  for  the  Degree,  or  Degrees, 
passed  over,  as  well  as  for  that  taken. 

Degrees  by  Mandate  are  charged  with  the 
same  fees  as  other  Degrees  of  the  same  kind 
are. 


433 

No  stipends  received  by  Persons  from  their 
Colleges,  or  by  University  Professors,  Lecturers, 
Officers,  &c.  make  a  Compounder. 

An  interpretation  1686,  (Lib.  Stat.  p.  345.) 
has  the  following  clauses: 

Whereas  it  has  been  a  frequent  practice 
amongst  Candidates  for  degrees  having  com- 
pounding estates  to  alienate,  or  make  over  the 
same,  whereby  the  said  Statute  [viz.  Omnes  quorum 
annuus  reditus,  &c.]  is  eluded,  and  the  Officers 
defrauded;  for  the  prevention  of  such  fraudulent 
practices  for  the  future,  we  do  hereby  order  and 
decree,  that  if  the  party  so  alienating,  or  in  any 
wise  conveying,  hath  reserved  to  himself  any  power 
whereby  he  may,  or  (without  any  such  reserved 
power)  actually  does  take  and  receive  to  his  own 
use,  directly  or  indirectly,  to  the  value  of  forty 
marks  per  annum  out  of  such  estate,  every  such 
person  to  be  taken  and  reputed  a  Compounder, 
and  to  satisfy  the  Officers  accordingly. 

All  incorporate  Persons  in  this  University 
for  the  future,  which  according  to  the  above- 
mentioned  Statute,  and  the  interpretation  thereof, 
have  compounding  estates,  shall  be  taken  and 
reputed  Compounders,  and  shall  satisfy  the  Uni- 
versity Officers  accordingly;  Oxford  men,  who 
shall  be  admitted  ad  eundem,  and  proceed  to  no 
other  degree,  only  excepted. 

The  Syndics  appointed  by  Grace  June  11, 1796, 
determined  that  persons  only  incorporated,  whether 


433 


from  Oxford  or  Dublin,  are  not  to  be  charged  with 
composition. 

N.B.  The  Oath  taken  before  the  admission  to 
any  degree  has  the  following  words  : 

Jurabis  quod  nihil  ex  us  omnibus  sciens, 
volens,  prcetermisisti,  quce  per  leges,  aut  probatas 
consuetudines  hujus  Academics  9  ad  hunc  gradum 
quern  ambis  adipiscendum,  aut  peragenda,  aut 
persolvenda,  requiruntur. 

In  all  doubtful  cases,  the  money  is  deposited  in 
the  hands  of  the  Proctors,  and  the  matter  is 
referred  to  the  Heads,  by  a  statement  in  writing, 
on  the  Commencement  Day. 


That  the  Rights  and  Privileges  of  the  Uni- 
versity may  be  maintained  and  preserved,  it  has 
the  power  to  prohibit,  under  the  severest  penalties,. 
all  its  Members  from  dealing  with  any  Tradesman, 
resident  in  the  Town,  who  shall  have  violated 
those  Rights  and  Privileges,  and  shall  refuse  to 
make  atonement  for  such  violation. 

The  following  extract  is  taken  from  Mr.  Hub- 
bard's  book  in  the  Treasury  of  Emmanuel  College. 

"  Oct.  2,  1705.  Whereas  by  Mr.  James  Flet- 
cher, present  Mayor  of  Cambridge,  and  Daniel 
Love,  and  Francis  Perry,  Aldermen  of  the 
said  Town,  and  Mr.  John  Wellbore,  Deputy 
Recorder  of  the  same,  the  Rights  and  Privileges 

EE 


434 

of  this  University  have  of  late  been  notoriously 
and  highly  violated  in  the  person  of  Sir  John 
Ellys,  the  Vice-Chancellor,  going  to  swear  the 
said  Mayor  and  the  four  Bayliffs  of  the  said 
Corporation  on  Michaelmas  Day  last,  according 
to  the  Usage  and  Charter  of  the  said  University ; 
for  the  preventing  therefore  the  many  growing 
mischiefs  that  may  proceed  from  our  not  opposing 
such  Attempts  and  Invasions  upon  our  Liberties, 
Rights  and  Privileges: 

"  May  it  please  you,  that  the  said  present 
Mayor,  Mr.  Francis  Perry,  Alderman,  and  Mr. 
J.  Wellbore,  Deputy  Recorder,  by  your  Sentence 
and  Decree  be  now  discommuned;  and  that  no 
College,  or  particular  Member  of  this  University 
whatsoever,  or  any  other  Person  privileged  ac- 
cording to  the  Charters  of  this  University,  shall 
deal  or  trade,  or  have  any  commerce  with  the 
said  persons  so  discommuned,  or  with  any  others 
that  act  by,  for,  or  under  them,  or  in  conjunction 
or.  partnership  with  them;  until  such  time  as 
the  said  Persons  so  discommuned  shall  ac- 
knowledge their  offence  in  violating  the  Rights 
of  this  University,  in  the  Chancell  of  Great  St. 
Marie's  Church,  before  the  Vice-Chancellor  and 
the  two  Proctors  for  the  time  being,  in  writing 
under  their  hands,  and  shall  promise  for  the 
time  to  come  never  again  willfully  to  offend  in 
like  manner.  And  if  any  College  or  Member 
of  the  University,  Scholar,  or  Scholar's  Servant, 
or  other  privileged  Person  whatsoever,  shall  pre- 
sume contrary  to  this  Decree,  by  themselves  or 


435 

•any  others  for  them,  to  buy,  or  otherwise  contract, 
give  or  continue  any  beneficial  Place  or  Em- 
ployment directly  or  indirectly  with,  or  to 
any  of  the  said  Persons  so  discommuned ;  that 
then  the  College,  Person  or  Persons  so  offending, 
shall  every  one  of  them  incur  the  penalty  of  £5. 
for  every  offence,  to  be  applyed  to  the  Common 
Chest  of  this  University;  and  if  a  Scholar  not 
Graduate,  he  shall  be  incapable  of  any  Degree; 
or  if  a  Graduate,  he  shall  be  suspended  from  all 
Degrees  till  he  makes  satisfaction  to  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  Proctors  of  this  University. 

"  Oct.  5,  1705.  Whereas  I,  James  Fletcher, 
Mayor  of  the  Town  of  Cambridge,  did  upon 
Michaelmas  Day  last  past,  by  mistake  and  mis- 
information, infringe  the  just  Rights  and  Pri- 
vileges of  the  University  of  Cambridge,  in  refusing 
and  denying  unto  Sir  John  Ellys,  the  Vice- 
Chancellor  of  the  said  University,  the  precedency 
in  the  joynt  seat  at  the  upper  end  of  the  Guild 
Hall  of  the  said  Town,  when  he  came  according 
to  the  Charter  of  the  said  University,  to  give  the 
usual  Oath  to  me  and  the  four  Bayliffs  of  the 
said  Corporation  :  which  refusal  of  mine  was  the 
occasion  of  a  great  deal  of  contempt  and  indignity 
offered  by  some  rude  persons  to  the  said  Vice- 
Chancellor  and  his  attendants;  for  which  offence 
I  stand  censured  and  discommuned  by  the  said 
University;  I  do  therefore  now  freely  acknowledge 
that  my  offence,  and  faithfully  promise  for  the 
future  never  to  be  guilty  of  the  like  offence,  but 
to  shew  all  due  respect  to  the  Vice-Chancellor 

E  E  2 


436 

of  the  said  University,  and  to  give  him  the  pre- 
cedence in  all  places  whatsoever  (as  of  right  he 
ought  to  have)  while  I  continue  in  my  Office : 
and  I  humhly  desire  that  the  said  sentence  of 
discommuning  may  be  recalled,  and  that  I  may 
he  restored  to  the  favour  of  the  said  University. 

"  JAMES  FLETCHER,  Mayor. 

"  Mem. — This  acknowledgement  was  made  and 
read  over  verbatim  by  the  above-mentioned  James 
Fletcher,  in  the  Chancell  of  Great  St.  Marie's 
Church  in  Cambridge,  Oct.  6,  1705,  and  then 
and  there  by  him  humbly,  submissively,  and 
publickly  acknowledged  and  delivered  as  his  own 
Act  and  Deed,  before  Sir  John  Ellys,  Vice- 
Chancellor,  Mr.  Nicholas  Parham,  and  Mr.  Daniel 
Newcome,  Proctors  of  the  said  University  (the 
Persons  and  places  appointed  by  the  decree  of 
the  Senate  thereof),  and  in  the  presence  of  the 
Rev.  Dr.  Ashton,  Doctor  in  Divinity,  Master 
of  Jesus  College,  and  of  two  Esquire  Bedells, 
viz.  John  Pern,  M.A.  and  Public  Notary,  and 
Edward  Clarke,  M.A.  Fellow  of  Clare  Hall, 
and  many  others  there  met  upon  the  occasion. 

"  Sic  testamur,  , 

"  JOHN   ELLYS,   Vice-Chancellor. 

NICHOLAS  PARHAM,  Senior  Proctor. 
DANIEL  NEWCOME,  Junior  Proctor. 
C.  ASHTON,  Master  of  Jesus  College. 
JOHN  PERN,  Notary  Public" 


437 


"  Oct.  6,  1705.  Whereas  I  Francis  Perry, 
Alderman  of  the  Town  of  Cambridge,  misled 
by  my  own  ignorance  and  error,  and  seduced  by 
the  bad  example  of  others  for  whose  judgment 
I  had  much  value,  upon  Michaelmas  Day  last 
past  (when  Sir  J.  Ellys,  Vice-Chancellor  of  the 
University  of  Cambridge,  according  to  his  place 
and  office  came  to  swear  Mr.  James  Fletcher 
Mayor,  and  the  four  Bailiffs  of  the  Town),  was 
one  of  those  that  opposed  the  said  Vice-Chan- 
cellor's taking  his  due  place,  and  in  so  doing  was 
guilty  of  a  high  violation  of  the  Rights  and 
Privileges  of  the  said  University,  from  which 
unadvised  Act  of  myself  and  others,  divers  un- 
worthy affronts  and  indignities  were  occasioned 
to  the  said  Vice-Chancellor  and  his  Attendants. 
Convinced  now  of  the  rashness  and  indiscretion 
of  such  actions,  and  moved  with  true  sorrow  and 
repentance  for  having  had  so  great  a  share  therein, 
I  acknowledge  my  fault,  and  here  before  you 
Mr.  Vice-Chancellor,  beg  pardon  of  the  Univer- 
sity, praying  your  kind  assistance  for  my  being 
reconciled  to  your  favour,  and  faithfully  promising, 
that  for  the  future  I  will  never  be  guilty  again 
of  the  like  offence,  but  shew  the  University,  and 
all  the  Members  thereof  respectively,  a  due 
reverence  and  regard,  and  whenever  I  can  in- 
fluence others,  dispose  them  to  do  the.  like. 

"  FRANCIS  PERRY,  Alderman." 
Attested  as  before. 


438 


"  March  29,  1706.  Whereas  I  John  Well- 
bore,  Esq.  Deputy  Recorder  of  the  Town  .of 
Cambridge,  not  fully  understanding  the  Rights 
and  Privileges  of  the  University  of  Cambridge, 
did  upon  Michaelmas  Day  last  past  (when  Sir 
John  Ellys  the  Vice-Chancellor  came  to  the 
Town  Hall,  according  to  the  ancient  Charters 
of  the  University,  to  administer  the  usual  Oath 
to  the  Mayor  and  Bailiffs  of  the  said  Town),  by 
my  opinion  then  declared,  encourage  the  refusal 
of  the  chief  place  to  the  said  Vice-Chancellor 
above  the  Mayor  in  the  said  Hall,  which  I  am 
now  convinced  that  of  right  He  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor ought  to  have ;  I  do  hereby  freely  acknow- 
ledge my  error  in  that  particular,  which  proceeded 
wholly  out  of  mistake,  and  not  out  of  malice  to 
the  said  University,  of  to  any  Member  thereof, 
and  promise  that  I  will  not  be  guilty  of  any 
such  like  indignity  for  the  future.  All  which 
I  declare  with  the  same  sincerity  that  I  now 
desire  to  be  restored  to  the  good  will  and  favour 
of  the  University. 

"  JOHN  WELLBORE. 

"  Read  and  subscribed  by  John  Wellbore,  Esq. 
in  the  Chancel  of  Great  St.  Mary's  Church  in 
Cambridge,  the  29th  of  March,  1706,  in  the 
presence  of  us, 

"  BARDSEY   FISHER,   Vice-Chancellor. 
R.  STEPHENS,   Senior  Proctor. 
R.  CLOTTERBOOKE,  Junior  Proctor. 
R.  GROVE,  Registrar*/" 


439 


form  of  Vrauper  to  to  mfc  before  a  tflenim. 


Oremus, 

Pro  Sancta  Christ!  Ecclesia  Catholica  ;  scilicet 
pro  universo  coetu  populi  Christian!  per  orbem 
terrarum  diffusi  ;  speciatim  vero  pro  Ecclesiis 
Anglicana  et  Hibernica:  et  in  his  praecipue  pro 
Augustissimo  GEORGIO,  Britanniarum  rege; 
fidei  defensore,  et  super  omnes  cujuscunque  or- 
dinis  homines,  in  omnibus  causis,  tarn  Ecclesiam 
quam  Rempublicam  spectantibus,  intra  regna  et 
dominia  sua  summo  gubernatore  :  et  pro  reliqua 
Regia  Prosapia, 

Oremus  etiam  pro  JMinistris  verbi  divini  et 
Sacramentorum,  tarn  Archiepiscopis  et  Episcopis, 
(nominatim  pro  Carolo  Archiepiscopo  Cantuariensi, 
et  Bowyero  Edvardo  Episcopo  Eliensi)  quam 
cseteris  Clericis  cujuscunque  ordinis,  et  dignitatis  : 
pro  iis  qui  Regiae  Majestati  sunt  a  secretioribus 
conciliis  ;  [pro  summo  totius  gentis  concilio]  pro 
hujus  regni  Proceribus,  et  Magistratibus  universis; 
ut  hi  omnes,  in  sua  quisque  vocatione,  ad  Dei 
gloriam,  populique  aedificationem,  officiis  suis 
fideliter  fungantur;  memores  reddendae  olim  ra- 
tionis,  cum  pro  Christi  tribunal!  sistentur  judi- 
candi. 

Oremus  pro  utraque  Academia;  et  in  hac  pro 
Celsissimo  GULIELMO  FREDERICO,  Duce  de 
Gloucester,  Cancellario  nostro:  pro  dignissimo 
Pro-Cancellario  :  pro  doctissimis  Professoribus, 


440 


Procuratoribus,  Taxatoribus,  caeterisque  qui  ullo 
apud  nos  funguntur  munere:  pro  singulis  Col- 
legiis,  nominatim  (prout  officii  mei  ratio  postulat) 
pro  Collegio  E.  F. ;  pro  Reverendo  admodum 
Doctissimoque  Magistro,  Sociis,  Scholaribus,  re- 
liquisque  in  eodem  bonis  literis  operam  navan- 
tibus. 

Postremo  pro  plebe  hujus  regni  uni versa,  ut 
in  vera  fide,  sanctoque  Dei  timore,  humili  erga 
Regem  obedientia,  et  fraterna  erga  se  invicem 
caritate,  vitam  suam  instituant. 

Gratias  denique  et  laudes  Deo  agamus  pro 
iis  omnibus  qui  in  fide  Christi  ex  hac  vita  ex- 
cesserunt;  humiliter  Deo  supplicantes,  ut  per 
illius  gratiam  vitam  nostram  ad  pium  illorum 
exemplar  componamus;  ut  ita  tandem  mortali 
hac  vita  defuncti,  cum  illis  in  die  supremo  ad 
Crelestem  gloriam  resurgamus,  per  Jesum  Christum 
Dominum  Nostrum,  cujus  nomine  et  verbis  has 
preces  claudamus: 

Pater  Noster  qui  es  in  ccelis,  sanctificetur 
nomen  tuum ;  adveniat  regnum  tuum  fiat ;  vo- 
luntas  tua,  sicut  in  crelis,  sic  etiam  in  terra : 
panem  nostrum  quotidianum  da  nobis  hodie;  et 
remitte  nobis  debita  nostra,  sicut  et  nos  remittimus 
debitoribus  nostris;  et  ne  nos  inducas  in  tenta- 
tionem,  sed  libera  nos  a  malo;  quia  tuum  est 
regnum,  et  potentia,  et  gloria,  in  saecula  saeculo- 
rum.  Amen. 

The  text  is  read  first  in  Greek,  then  in  Latin. 


441 

Finish  with 

Gratia  Domini  nostri  Jesu  Christi,  et  caritas 
Dei,  et  communicatio  Spiritus  Sancti,  sit  semper 
cum  omnibus  nobis.  Amen. 


Draper   fcrforc  a  Diuiutt})  act 

Oremus. 

Actiones  nostras  singulas,  Domine,  clemen- 
tissimo  tuo  favore  praeveni,  et  perpetuo  auxilio 
prosequere,  ut  in  omnibus  operibus  nostris  in  te 
inceptis,  continuatis,  et  finitis,  sanctum  nomen 
tuum  glorificemus,  et  tandem  miseratione  tua 
vitam  aeternam  consequamur,  per  Jesum  Christum 
Dominum  nostrum.  Amen. 


t|roft00iom0  Sncrptorum  in 

In  Dei  Nomine,  Amen.  Ego  A.  B.  ex 
animo  amplector  Universam  Sacram  Scripturam 
Canonicam  veteri  et  Novo  Testamento  compre- 
hensam,  omniaque  ilia,  quae  vera  Ecclesia  Christi, 
Sancta  et  Apostolica,  verbo  Dei  subjecta,  et  eodem 
gubernata,  respuit,  respuo  ;  quae  tenet,  teneo  ;  et 
in  his  omnibus  ad  finem  usque  vitse  perseverabo, 
Deo  mihi  pro  summa  sua  misericordia  gratiam 
praestante,  per  Jesum  Christum  Dominum  Nos- 
trum. 


FEES 

FOR 

ALL    DEGREES. 


i5aci)fior  of  girt*. 

£.    *.    d. 

A  Bachelor  of  Arts,  at  the  regular 

time  pays  to  the  Junior  Proctor 3     7     6 

A  Bachelor  of  Arts,  at  any  other 
time,  pays  to  the  Junior  Proctor 6  11  0 

A  Bachelor  of  Arts,  Fellow  of 
King's,  (at  whatever  time  he  takes  his 
Degree,)  pays  to  the  Junior  Proctor  ..250 

If  Compounders,  they  pay  in  all  the 
above  cases,  in  addition 8  6  4 

All  the  above  pay  to  the  Registrary  53     3     0 

A  Bachelor  of  Arts,  from  Oxford 
or  Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to  the 
Junior  Proctor 3  13  6 

Although  a  Compounder  he  pays  no 
additional  fee  unless  he  proceeds  to 
a  higher  Degree. 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 33     4     0 

3  Three  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for 
Stamp  duty. 


443 

£.    *.    d. 

Every  Person  proceeding  to  the 
Degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  after 
having  made  a  declaration  to  the 
Master  or  Locum-Tenens  of  his  Col- 
lege, that  it  was  not  his  intention 
to  proceed  to  that  Degree,  shall  pay 
beyond  the  usual  fee  to  the  Common 
Chest.  300 


of  Hrt0. 

A  Master  of  Arts,  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor  .................  5  4  6 

A  Master  of  Arts,  Fellow  of  a  Col- 
lege, pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor  .....  3  10  6 

A  Master  of  Arts,  Fellow  of  King's 
College,  pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor  ...  3  8  6 

IfCompounders,  they  pay  in  addition     864 
All  the  above  pay  to  the  Registrary  4  6     6     0 

A  Master  of  Arts,  from  Oxford  or 
Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor  ......................  4  14  0 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary  .......  46     7     0 

Although  a  Compounder  he  pays  no 
additional  fee,  unless  he  proceeds  to  a 
higher  Degree. 

4  Six   pounds   of   which   are    paid    to    Government    for 
Stamp  duty. 


444 

f .  *.    d. 

A  Person  from  Oxford  or  Dublin, 
previously  Bachelor  of  Arts,  on  taking 
the  Degree  of  Master  of  Arts,  pays  to 
the  Senior  Proctor 8  18  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  addition     864 
He  pays  to  the Registrary 5910     0 

*?arf)rlor  of  Dttnmtin 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  previously 
Master  of  Arts,  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor 2  2  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  addition     864 
He  pays  to  the  Registrary 6  6     6     0 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  having 
taken  no  Degree  previously,  pays  to 
the  Senior  Proctor 10  14  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pay  sin  addition  24  19     0 
He  pays  to  the  Registrary 6  6     6     0 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  from  Oxford 
or  Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor 4  0  0 

fi  Nine  pounds   of  which   are   paid    to   Government   for 
Stamp  duty. 

6  Six   pounds  of   which    are    paid    to  ;  Government   for 
Stamp  duty, 


445 

£.    *>    d. 

Although  a  Compounder,  he  pays 
no  additional  fee  unless  he  proceeds  to 
a  higher  Degree. 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 7  6     7    0 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity  pays  to 
the  Marshall 8  on  keeping  his  Act  ...  0  8  6 

He  pays  to  the  Clerk  of  St.  Mary's 
on  preaching  his  English  Sermon  ....  0  1  6 

On  preaching  his  Clerum  ...  k  ...     0     4     0 

Doctor  of  £htnmt|>. 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity,  previously 
Bachelor  of  Divinity,  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor 3  4  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition   .  8  6  4 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 76     6     0 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity,  previously 
Master  of  Arts,  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor 7  6  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition . 16  12  8 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 76     6     0 

7  Six  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 

8  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 


44-6 

£.    s.    d. 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity  pays  to  the 
Professor  on  Creation  ............  1  7  0 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity,  from  Ox- 
ford or  Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to 
the  Senior  Proctor 4  10  0 

He  pays  no  fee  for  Composition. 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 96     7     0 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity  pays  to  the 
Marshall1  on  keeping  his  Act ......  0  8  6 

He  pays  to  the  School-keeper1  on 
Admission  to  his  Degree 1  6  0 

He  pays  to  the  Clerk  of  St.  Mary's 
on  preaching  his  English  Sermon 0  1  6 

On  preaching  his  Clerum  ....*....     0     4     0 

tfacDdor  of  (ftifeil  2iaU). 

A  Bachelor  of  Civil  Law  pays  to 
the  Senior  Proctor 3  0  0 

If  he  has  not  a  Certificate2  of 
having  declared  for  Law,  or  if  he  comes 
from  Oxford  or  Dublin,  he  pays  in 
addition,  to  the  University  Chest  ....  3  0  0 

9  Six  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 

1  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 

2  This  Certificate  is  to  be  delivered  to  the  Proctor,  and 
to  be  produced  by  him  at  the  University  Audit,  or  he  forfeits 
three  pounds  to  the  Common  Chest* 


44? 

£.    *.    d. 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  a  further 
sum  of  .......................  8  6  4 

A  Bachelor  of  Law  pays  to  the 
Registrary  .......................  *6  6  0 

He  pays  to  the  Professor  for  his 
Act  ..............................  770 

He  pays  to  the  Marshall3  on 
keeping  his  Act  ..................  0  8  6 

He  pays  to  the  School-keeper3  on 
Admission  to  his  degree  .............  010  0 

A  Bachelor  of  Law,  from  Oxford 
or  Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor  ...............  ....  4  1  6 

If  incorporated  only,  and  proceeding 
to  no  higher  degree,  he  pays  no  com- 
position. 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary  .........  *6     7     0 


Doctor  of 

A  Doctor  of  Civil  Law,  previously 
Bachelor  of  Law,  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor  ..........................  316  0 

A  Doctor  of  Law,  previously  Mas- 
ter of  Arts,  pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor  760 

2  Six  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duties. 

3  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 


448 

£.    *.    d. 
A  Doctor  of  Law,  if  a  Compounder, 

pays  in  addition 8     6     4 

A  Doctor  of  Law  pays  to  the  Re- 
gistrary 46     6     0 

He  pays  to  the  Professor  for  two 
Acts 14  14     0 

He    pays    to    the    Marshall5     on 
keeping  each  Act 0     8     6 

He  pays   to  each   Doctor  present, 

At  Admission 0     6     8 

At  Creation.  ...»».  004 


070 

He  pays  to  the  School-keeper5  on 
Admission  to  his  degree 1  6  0 

A  Doctor  of  Law,  from  Oxford  or 
Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor > .  5  16  0 

Although  a  Compounder,  he  pays 
no  additional  fee* 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 46     7     0 


4  Six  pounds  of   which    are   paid  -  to    Government    for 
Stamp  duty. 

8  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  servants. 


449 

Bailor  of 

A  Bachelor  of  Physic  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor 3  0  0 

If  he  has  not  a  Certificate 6  of  having 
declared  for  Physic,  or  if  he  comes  from 
Oxford  or  Dublin,  he  pays  in  addition 
three  pounds  to  the  University  Chest. 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  a  further 
sum  of g  Q  ^ 

A  Bachelor  of  Physic  pays  to  the 
Registrary 7  6  6  Q 

He  pays  to  the  Professor  for  his  Act     700 
He     pays    to    the    Marshall8    on 
keeping  his  Act 0     8     6 

He  pays  to  the  School-keeper8  on 
Admission  to  his  Degree 0  10  0 

A  Bachelor  of  Medicine,  from  Oxford 
or  Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor 4  j  Q 

If  incorporated  only,  and  proceeding 
to  no  higher  Degree,  he  pays  no  Com- 
position. 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 7  6     7     0 

5  This  Certificate  is  to  be  delivered  to  the  Proctor,  and  to 
be  produced  by  him  at  the  University  Audit,  or  he  forfeit* 
three  pounds  to  the  Common  Chest. 

7  Six  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 

8  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 

FF 


450 

Doctor  Of 

£.    *.    </. 

A  Doctor  of  Physic,  previously  Ba- 
chelor of  Physic,  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor 3  16  0 

A  Doctor  of  Physic,  previously  a 
Master  of  Arts,  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor 7  6  0 

A  Doctor  of  Physic,  if  a  Corn- 
pounder,  pays  in  addition 8  6  4 

A  Doctor  of  Physic  pays  to  the 
Registrary 96  6  0 

He  pays  to  the  Professor  for  two 
Acts 11  11  0 

He  pays  to  every  Doctor  of  the 
Faculty  present  at  Admission  and 
Creation 0  7  0 

He  pays  to  the  Marshall l  on  keep- 
ing each  Act 0  8  6 

He  pays  to  the  School-keeper1  on 
Admission  to  his  Degree 1  6  0 

A  Doctor  of  Physic,  from  Oxford 
or  Dublin,  incorporated  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor  . 5  16  0 

Although  a  Compounder,  he  pays  no 
additional  fee. 

He  pays  to  the  'Registrary 9  6     7     0 

9  Six   pounds    of   which    are   paid   to    Government    for 
Stamp   duty. 

1  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 


451 

Ittcenttate  in 

£.    s.  d. 
A    Licentiate   in    Physic  pays    to 

the  Senior  Proctor 3  10  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  addition  864 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 2  6     6  0 

He  pays  to  the  Professor 4  14  6 

To   a   Doctor   of   the  Faculty  on 

Examination  he  pays 0  10  6 

He  pays  to  the  Marshall 3  on  Ad- 
mission   „  0  8  6 

ttatlplor  of  itttmc* 

A  Bachelor  of  Music  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor 30  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  addition     864 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 2  6     6     0 

He  pays  to  the  Professor  on  Ad- 
mission    0  5  0 

He  pays  to  the  School-keeper3  on 
Admission 0  10  0 

A  Bachelor  of  Music,  from  Oxford 
or  Dublin,  incorporated,  pays 4  1  6 

If  he  proceeds  to  no  higher  degree 
he  pays  no  Composition. 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 2  6     7     0 

2  Six    pounds   of    which   are    paid    to    Government    for 
Stamp   duty. 

3  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 

FF  2 


452 

Doctor  of 

£.    s.    d. 

A  Doctor  of  Music,  previously  Ba- 
chelor of  Music,  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor 3  16  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition    8  6  4 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 4  6     6     0 

He  pays  to  the  Professor  on  Ad- 
mission    1  5  0 

He  pays  to  the  Marshall5  on  Ad- 
mission    1  6  0 

A  Doctor  of  Music,  having  taken 
no  Degree  previously,  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor 6  16  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pay  sin  addition  16  12     8 
He  pays  to  the  Registrary 4  6     6     0 

He  pays  to  the  Professor  on  Ad- 
mission    1  5  0 

He  pays  to  the  Marshall5  on  Ad- 
mission   1  6  0 

A  Doctor  of  Music,  from  Oxford 
or  Duhlin,  incorporated  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor , 5  16  0 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 4  6     7     0 

4  Six    pounds    of   which    are    paid    to   Government   for 
Stamp  duty. 

5  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 


453 


4%ta0trr  of  &rt0  in  Uigfjt  of 

A  Master  of  Arts,  in  Right  of  Nobility, 
pays  the  following  sums  to  the  undermentioned 
Persons : 

£.    s.    d. 
To  the  Vice-Chancellor 2  14     0 

To  the  Orator 10  10     0 

To  the  Librarian 1     1     0 

To  the  Scrutators 1     1     0 

To  the  Bedells .  .  4     4     0 

To  the  Proctors 2     2     0 

To  the  Marshall6  .  156 


22  17    6 


To  the  Registrary 711     7     0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor  in  addition 8     6     4 


6  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 

7  Ten  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 


454 


Doctor  of  OTtiJil  aato  in  nigftt  of 

A  Doctor  of  Civil  Law,  in  Right  of  Nobility, 
pays  the  following  sums  to  the  under-mentioned 
Persons : 

£.    s.    d. 

To  the  Vice-Chancellor 2  14     0 

To  the  Orator 21     0     0 

To  the  Librarian  ..........     1     1     0 

To  the  Scrutators 1     1     0 

To  the  Bedells 4     4     0 

To  the  Proctors 2     2     0 

To  the  Marshall 8  .  156 


33     7     6 


To  the  Registrary 911     7     0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor  in  addition  864 


8  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 

9  Ten  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 


duty. 


455 


Doctor  of  Oitumtp  in  tttgtjt  of  jlotulttp. 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity,  in  Right  of  Nobility, 
pays  the  following  sums  to  the  under-mentioned 
Persons : 

£.    *.    d. 
To  the  Vice-Chancellor 5     5     0 

To  the  Orator 21     0     0 

To  the  Librarian 2     2     0 

To  the  Scrutators 2     2     0 

To  the  Bedells     8     8     0 

To  the  Proctors 4     4     0 

To  the  Marshall l  .  156 


44     6     6 

He  also  pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor 
for  two  Compositions 16  12     8 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary  .....  212     8     0 

1  Who  distributes  it  to  the  other  Servants. 

2  Ten  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duties. 


456 


MANDATE    DEGREES, 


of  2irt<3  tip  liopal  fttantiatr. 


A  Master  of  Arts  by  Royal  Man- 
date, previously  Bachelor  of  Arts,  pays 
to  the  Senior  Proctor  ..........  5  4  6 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition ......  ..............  8  6  4 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary    .....  311     7     0 

A  Master  of  Arts  by  Royal  Man- 
date, having  taken  no  degree  previously, 
pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor  .......  812  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition .................  16  12  8 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary  .....  *11     7     0 

He  pays  to  the  Chancellor's  Secre- 
tary ...................  2  2  0 

To  each  Proctor  £.110    .....     2     2     0 

To  the  Registrary  for  drawing  the 
Petition  .....  110 


3  Ten  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 


457 

£.    *.    d. 
To    the   Bedell,    for  carrying    the 

Petition  to  the  Heads  to  be  signed  ..220 
To  the  Servants  4   ..........     11     0 


of  DtDtnitt>  lip  iiopal 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity  by  Royal 
Mandate,  previously  Master  of  Arts, 
pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor  .......  2  2  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition ...................  8  6  4 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary    .....  511     7     0 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  previously 
Bachelor  of  Arts,  pays  to  the  Senior 
Proctor  ..................  7  6  6 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition ...................  16  12  8 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary  .....  511     7     0 

A  Bachelor  of  Divinity,  having 
taken  no  degree  previously,  pays  to  the 
Senior  Proctor  ..............  10  14-  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition ...................  24  19  0 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary   .....  512     8     0 

4  The  School-keeper,  the  University  Marshall,  the  Proctors' 
servants,  Vice-Chancellor's  servant,  5*.  Registrary  's  servant,  \s. 

3  Ten  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 


458 

£.    s.    d. 

He  pays  to  the  Chancellor's  Secre- 
tary         2     2     0 

To  each  Proctor  £.110 2     2     0 

To  the  Registrary  for  drawing  the 
Petition. 1     1     0 

To   the   Bedell,   for    carrying   the 
Petition  to  the  Heads  to  be  signed  ...     2     2     0 

To  the  Servants 6  .  110 


Doctor  of  Dibinitp  tip  Uopal 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity  by  Royal 
Mandate,  previously  Bachelor  of  Di- 
vinity, pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor  ...  3  4  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition 8  6  4 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 711     7     0 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity  by  Royal 
Mandate,  previously  Master  of  Arts, 
pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor 7  6  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition .  . 16  12  8 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 712     8     0 

6  The  School-keeper,  the  University  Marshall,  the  Proctors' 
servants,  Vice-Chancellor's  servant,  5«v.  Registrary 's  servant,  Is. 

7  Ten  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 


459 

£.   M.   d. 
A   Doctor  of  Divinity   by   Royal 

Mandate,  previously  Bachelor  of  Arts, 

pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor 1010     6 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition    24  19  0 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 812     8     0 

A  Doctor  of  Divinity  hy  Royal 
Mandate,  having  taken  no  degree  pre- 
viously, pays  to  the  Senior  Proctor  ...  13  18  0 

If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  in  ad- 
dition  33  5  4 

He  pays  to  the  Registrary 812     80 

He  pays  to  the  Chancellor's  Secre- 
tary    2  2  0 

To  each  Proctor  ,£.110 2     2     0 

To  the  Registrary  for  drawing  the 
Petition 1  1  0 

To  the  Bedell,  for  carrying  the 
Petition  to  the  Heads  to  be  signed  ...  2  2  0 

To  the  Servants9 2     2     0 

In  the  same  manner  the  fees,  for 
the  degrees  of  Bachelor  and  Doctor  of 
Civil  Law,  and  Bachelor  and  Doctor  of 
Physic  by  Royal  Mandate,  may  be  de- 
termined. 

8  Ten  pounds  of  which  are  paid  to  Government  for  Stamp 
duty. 

9  The  School-keeper,  the  University  Marshall,  the  Proctors' 
servants,  Vice-Chancellor's  servant,  10j.  Registrary's  servant,  1*. 


460 


The  following  Decree  of  the  HEADS,  dated 
March  9,  1767,  is  taken  from  the  Statute 
Book,  p.  513. 

"  Whereas,  in  Certificates  to  the  Chancellor 
of  the  University  in  order  to  obtain  his  Majesty's 
Mandate  for  a  Degree,  it  has  been  usual  to  set 
forth,  that  the  granting  of  such  Degree  will  not 
be  prejudicial  to  the  University  in  general,  or 
to  any  College  in  particular. 

"  It  was  this  day  agreed,  by  the  Vice-Chan- 
cellor  and  Heads,  that  no  such  Certificate  shall  be 
signed  for  the  future,  until  the  Petitioner,  or  some 
Member  of  the  Senate  as  his  Sponsor,  shall 
engage  to  pay  to  the  College,  whereof  he  is 
a  Member,  and  to  the  Officers  of  the  same,  such 
customary  fees  as  other  Candidates  for  their 
respective  Degrees  usually  do1. 

"  It  was  agreed  at  the  same  time  to  sign  no 
Certificate  on  behalf  of  such  Persons,  as  are  not 
Members  of  any  College  in  this  University." 


1  This  precaution  having  been  neglected,  a  Person  lately 
obtained  the  Degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity,  and  afterwards 
refused  to  pay  the  usual  fees  to  the  Officers  of  his  College. 


DISTRIBUTIONS 
FEODORUM. 


£.  s.    d. 

PRO-CANCELLARIO    ....  0    0     4 

Oratori 016 

Registrario     . 010 

Praesentatori       .......  0     0     4 

Bibliothecario .004 

Pulsatori 003 

Apparitor! 006 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae       ....  0     0     4 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti        ...  0     0     2 

Scrutatoribus 008 

Bedellis 0  10  10 

Moderatoribus 090 

Procuratoribus 0  14     0 

Eorum  Servis 040 

Pro-Procuratoribus      ....  0     7     0 

Eorum  Servis 020 

Cistae  Communi 0  15     3 

£.376 


462 


attaint  13acralaurai0  all  ttapttetam  ooltnt, 

£.   s.    d. 

Pro-Cancellario       004 

Oratori 016 

Registrario    ..•.,...  0     1     0 

Praesentatori 004 

Bibliothecario     ......  0     0     4 

Pulsatori        003 

Apparitor! 010 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae       ....  0     0     4 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Scrutatoribus 008 

Bedellis 0  10  10 

Moderatoribus 1  10     0 

Procuratoribus 176 

Eorum  Servis 040 

Pro-Procuratoribus       .     .     .     .  0  13  10 

Eorum  Servis 020 

Cistae  Communi  1  16  11 


£.  -6  11     0 


463 


artium 


Pro-Cancellario       .....  004 

Oratori      ........  016 

Registrario    .......  010 

Praesentatori  ........  0     0     4 

Bibliothecario     ......  004 

Pulsatori        .......  003 

Apparitor!     .......  006 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae       ....  0     0     4 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Scrutatoribus      ......  0     0     8 

Bedellis    ........  0  10  10 

Moderatoribus    ......  090 

Procuratoribus    ......  020 

Eorum  Servis     ......  010 

Pro-Procuratoribus       ....  0     1     0 

Eorum  Servis     ......  006 

Cistae  Communi       .....  0  15    3 

£.250 


464 


£lritum  i3arralaumi0,  (FVcomctteid  Del 
23ufiUnirit0t0,  3JHirorporatu0  soUnt, 

£.  t.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario 004 

Oratori 016 

Registrario 010 

Praesentatori 004 

Bibliothecario 004 

Pulsatori 003 

Apparitor! 010 

Ecclesiae  B.  Marias      ....  0     0     4 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Scrutatoribus '008 

Bedellis 0  10     0 

Moderatoribus 050 

Procuratoribus 026 

Eorum  Servis 002 

Cistse  Communi 2     9  11 

£.  3  13     6 


465 


&rtittm 

£.    s.    d. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Oratori 020 

Registrario ..010 

Praesentatori 010 

Bibliothecario     ......  0     0     8 

Pulsatori 006 

Apparitor! 006 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae      ....  0     0     2 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0    0     2 

Scrutatoribus 008 

Bedellis 176 

Moderatoribus 030 

Procuratoribus 0  17     6 

Eorum  Servis 040 

Pro-Procuratoribus      ....  0     8     8 

Eorum  Servis 020 

CistsB  Communi 1  13     2 

£.5     4     6 


G  c; 


466 


atttittn  4*lagi0ta:  <&oUegu  Socm*,  aoUut, 

<£.  *.   rf. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Oratori .020 

Registrario ..010 

Praesentatori 010 

Bibliothecario .008 

Pulsatori 006 

Apparitori 006 

Ecclesise  B.  Maria 002 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....     0     0     2 

Scrutatoribus 008 

Bedellis    ........     1     7     6 

Moderatoribus 030 

Procuratoribus 070 

Eorum  Servis 040 

Pro-Procuratoribus 036 

Eorum  Servis 020 

Cistae  Communi      .          .     .         0  14  10 


£.3  10     6 


467 


Pro-Cancellario 020 

Oratori 020 

Registrario 010 

Praesentatori .     ..  0     10 

Bibliothecario     ......  0     0     8 

Pulsatori 006 

Apparitori ..006 

Ecclesise  B.  Mariae     ....  0     0     2 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Bedellis 176 

Moderatoribus 030 

Procuratoribus 062 

Eorum  Servis 040 

Pro-Procuratoribus      ....  0     3     0 

Eorum  Servis 020 

Cistae  Communi      .     .     .     .     .  0  14  10 

£.3     8     6 


G  G  % 


468 


fcrtttim  ffcagfcter,  ®xonien#i*  toel 

incorporatu*  eoltott, 


<£.  *.    d. 

Pro-Cancellario  ......  020 

Oratori     ........  020 

Registrario    .......  010 

Praesentatori  .......  0     1     0 

Bibliothecario     ......  008 

Pulsatori  .     .     ......  006 

Apparitori     .......  010 

Ecclesise  B.  Mariae      ....  0     0     2 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Scrutatoribus      ......  008 

Bedellis    ........  0  17     4 

Moderatoribus    ......  030 

Procuratoribus   ......  0  10     0 

Eorum  Servis     ......  012 

Cistse  Communi      .....  2  13     4 

.*  14     0 


469 


,  priua  ftrttum  Baccaiaurtua 

©xontetws  fcel  Dufclimcwne,  eoltoit, 

£    s.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario 024 

Oratori 036 

Registrario 020 

Praesentatori 014 

Bibliothecario 010 

Pulsatori 009 

Apparitor!     .......  0     1     6 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae     ....  0     0     6 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     4 

Scrutatoribus 014 

BedeUis 1  17    6 

Moderatoribus 080 

Procuratoribus 100 

Eorum  Servis 042 

Pro-Procuratoribus       ....  0     8     8 

Eorum  Servis 020 

Cistae  Communi  431 


£.8  18     0 


470 


prui0 


<£.    5.     d. 

Pro-Cancellario  ......  020 

Procuratoribus    ......  040 

Professor!      .......  020 

Bedellis     ........  170 

Kegistrario     .......  010 

Bibliothecario     ......  0     1     0 

Pulsatori  ........  0     1     0 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Cistae  Communi      .....  0     3  10 

£.220 


471 


dieologiac  Baccalaurrua,  nullo  pr(u* 
itwgnitus  graUu,  *aUrit 

£.  *.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario     * 044 

Professor!      . 020 

Orator! 036 

Registrario 030 

Praesentatori 014 

Bibliothecario .020 

Pulsatori ..019 

Apparitor! 010 

Ecclesiae  B.  Marias      ....    0     0     6 
Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....     0     0     6 

Scrutatoribus 014 

Bedellis 354 

Moderatoribus 0  12     0 

Procuratoribus 1  15     6 

Eorum  Servis 080 

Pro-Procuratoribus      .     .     .     .     0  15     8 

Eorum  Servis 040 

Cistae  Communi 2  12     3 

£.10  14     0 


472 


Sacrae  Cfjeologtar  Baccalaurrue,  <Dx<mirn*i* 
DufcUnien0i0,  incorporatus 


Pro-Cancellario  ......  020 

Procuratoribus    ......  040 

Professor!      .......  020 

Bedellis    ........  170 

Registrario    .......  010 

Bibliothecario     ......  010 

Pulsatori  ........  010 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Cistae  Communi  2     1  10 


£.400 


STfjroIogiar  ^rofr^or,  ptiu0 
Cfjcologiac  13acca!aurni0, 

£.   s.    d. 
Pro-Cancellario  ......     020 

Procuratoribus   ......     020 

Professori      ......     .010 

Bedellis    ........     270 

Registrario   ...     ^     ...     0     1     0 
Bibliothecario    ......     014 

Pulsatori       .......     024 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....     0     0     4 

Scrutatoribus      ......     008 

Cistae  Communi      .....     064 

£3     4     0 


473 

CfKOlogtac  #roft00or,  prw* 
£#agt<mr,  eoUrit 

£.    8.     d. 

Pro-Cancellario 040 

Procuratoribus 060 

Professori ..030 

Bedellis 3  14     0 

Registrario 020 

Bibliothecario 024 

Pulsatori ..034 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....     0     0     6 

Scrutatoribus 008 

Cistae  Communi      ...  2  10     2 


£.760 

,  <B*otii*n0i0 

incorporate  eoldit, 

£.  s.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Procuratoribus 020 

Professori 010 

Bedellis 1  16     4 

Registrario 010 

Bibliothecario     ......  0     1     4 

Pulsatori 024 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     4 

Scrutatoribus 008 

Cistae  Communi 230 

,£.4  10     0 


474 


Higuttt  Eatcaltiuretis,  soilnt, 

£.   *.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Procuratoribus  ......  0     2     0 

Professor! 020 

Bedellis 1  10     0 

Registrario 010 

Bibliothecario 008 

Pulsatori 014 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti   ....  0     0     2 

Cistae  Communi  1     0  10 


£.3     0     0 


Uegutn  iSar;  afaurim  ©xcmicnsi*  tori 
t  tncorporatu0, 


Pro-Cancellario  .     .     .     .   °.  J  .  0     2     0 

Procuratoribus    ......  020 

Professori  ........  020 

Bedellis     ........  1  10     0 

Registrario    ......  -.010 

Bibliothecario     ......  008 

Pulsatori  ........  014 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  .     .'   .     .  0     0     2 

Communi  ......  224 

£.4     1     6 


475 
argutii  Doctor,  priua  argiim  Baccalaureu*, 


£.    *.    rf. 

Pro-Cancellario  .     .     .     .     .     .  0     2     0 

Procuratoribus 020 

Professor! 020 

Bedellis 2180 

Registrario 010 

Bibliothecario     ......  0     1     4 

Pulsatori 018 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     4 

Cistse  Communi 078 


£.3  16     0 


ZDoctor,  priuo  ^rttum 


£.  *.    A 

Pro-Cancellario  ......  040 

Procuratoribus    ......  0  10     8 

Professor!       .......  040 

Bedellis     .     .......  480 

Registrario    .......  020 

Bibliothecario     ......  020 

Pulsatori  ........  030 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     6 

Scrutatoribus      ......  034 

Cistae  Communi      .....  186 

£.7     6     0 


476 


ftrgum  Doctor,  <Dxom*n0i0  Del 
incorporatUB  soluit, 


£.  *.    d. 

Pro-Cancellario  ......     020 

Procuratoribus    ......     020 

Professor!       .......     020 

Bedellis    ........     2180 

Registrario    .......     010 

Bibliothecario     ......     014 

Pulsatori  ........     018 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....     0     0     4 

Cistae  Communi      ...          .278 


£.5  16     0 


fttfiJictnac  i$artalaureu0t 

£.     9.      d. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Procuratoribus 020 

Professori 020 

Bedellis 1  10     0 

Registrario 010 

Bibliothecario 008 

Pulsatori 014 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....0-02 

Cistae  Communi i     0  10 


£.  3     0     0 


477 


13accalaurw0,  ©xonitust*  Del 
Unien0i0,  incorporatue 


Pro-Cancellario  ......  020 

Procuratoribus   ......  020 

Professor!       .......  020 

Bedellis    ........  1  10     0 

Registrario    .......  010 

Eibliothecario     ......  008 

Pulsatori  ........  014 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  .     .     .     .0     0     2 

Cistffi  Communi  224 


£.4     1     6 


Sector,  ptius  IHcDicinac 
eolbtt, 

£.  ^.    d. 

Pro-Cancellario  ......  020 

Procuratoribus    ......  020 

Professor!      .......  020 

Bedellis    ........  2  18     0 

Registrario    .     .     .....  010 

Bibliothecario    .     .     .     .     .     .  0     1     4 

Pulsatori  ........  018 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     4 

Cistae  Communi          ....  0     7     8 


£.3  16     0 


478 
jtleOictnar  Doctor,    prius  artium  Jttagteter, 


<£.  *.    rf. 

Pro-Cancellario 040 

Procuratoribus 0  10     8 

Professor! 040 

Bedellis 480 

Registrario 020 

Bibliothecario 020 

Pulsatori 030 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     6 

Scrutatoribus 034 

Cistae  Communi      .     .  186 


<£.7    6    0 


iftteuiattar  doctor,  0xonien0i0  Uf  I  Dutiltntnt0i0f 
intorpotattt0 


Pro-Cancellario       .....  020 

Procuratoribus    ......  020 

Professori      .......  020 

Bedellis     .     ,     ......  2  18     0 

Registrario    .......  010 

Bibliothecario     ......  014 

Pulsatori       .......  018 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     4 

Cistae  Communi      .....  278 


£.5  16     0 


479 


in  Jfttfrtctna,  0oUnt, 


£.  s.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario       .     •»     ...  0     2     0 

Procuratoribus    ......  054 

Professor!  ........  020 

Bedellis    ........  1  16     0 

Registrario    .......  010 

Bibliothecario     ......  008 

Pulsatori  ........  010 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0    0     2 

Cistse  Communi  1     1  10 


£.  3  10     0 


£.  s.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Procuratoribus 020 

Professori 020 

Bedellis 1  10     0 

Registrario 010 

Bibliothecario 008 

.Pulsatori 014 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti   .^..002 
Cistae  Communi 1     0  10 

£.3     0     0 


480 


itfu0irar  fiaccalaumi0,  Otoonif  rote  Hel 
linif  11010,  incorporatue,  0oUut, 

£.    *.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Procuratoribus 020 

Professor! 020 

Bedellis 1  10     0 

Registrario 010 

Bibliothecario 008 

Pulsatori 014 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     2 

Cistae  Communi 224 

,£.416 


Jftu0ica£  Doctor,  prtu0  4ttu0tta* 


J.    *.    d. 
Pro-Cancellario  ......     020 

Procuratoribus    ......     020 

Professori  ........     020 

Bedellis     ........     2  18     0 

Registrario    .......     0     1     0 

Bibliothecario     ......  ,014 

Pulsatori  .......     .018 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....     0     0     4 

Cistae  Communi      .....     078 


£.  3  16     0 


481 


doctor  nullo  prtua  ineigmtue  grata, 
aottnt, 

£.    s.    d. 

Pro-Cancellario 040 

Procuratoribus 040 

Professor! 040 

Bedellis    ........480 

Registrario 020 

Bibliothecario 020 

Pulsatori 030 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....     0    0     6 
Cistae  Communi  .  186 


£.6  16     6 


Bortor,  €)xontftt0t0  bet 
twrorporatue  eolUtt. 

£.    s.    d. 

Pro-Cancellario 020 

Procuratoribus 020 

Professori 020 

Bedellis 2180 

Registrario 010 

Bibliothecario 014 

Pulsatori 018 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0     4 

Cistae  Communi 278 


£.5  16     0 
H  H 


482 


ftrtium  JBagteter  >  per  iiitem  &*gia0,  priu* 

0oUHt, 


£.  s.   d. 

Pro-Cancellario       .....  020 

Oratori      ........  020 

Registrario    .......  010 

Praesentatori  .......  010 

Bibliothecario     .....  008 

Pulsatori       .......  006 

Apparitor!     .......  006 

Ecclesise  B.,  Mariae      ....  0     0    2 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0    0    2 

Scrutatoribus      ......  008 

Bedellis    ........  176 

Moderatoribus    ......  030 

Procuratoribus    ......  0  17     6 

Eorum  Servis     ......  040 

Pro-Procuratoribus      ....  0    8    8 

Eorum  Servis     .......  0     2    0 

Cistae  Communi  1  13    2 


£.5     4     6 


1  If  a  Compounded  he  pays  one  Composition. 


483 


arttum  ittagister    per  atteras  Itigia0,  nuilo 
fngignittt*  gratm,  sotott, 


Pro-Cancellario       .....  024 

Oratori      ........  036 

Registrario    .......  020 

Praesentatori       ......  014 

Bibliothecario     ......  010 

Pulsatori        .......  009 

Apparitor!     .......  010 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae      ....  0    0     6 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0    0    4 

Scrutatoribus      ......  014 

Bedellis     ........  1  18     4 

Moderatoribus    ......  0  12    0 

Procuratoribus    ......  1  11     6 

Eorum  Servis      ......  080 

Pro-Procuratoribus      ....  0  15    8 

Eorum  Servis     ......  040 

Cistae  Communi  .285 


£.  8  12     0 


2  If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  two  Compositions. 


HH 


484 


Cfjeoiogiae  i3accalaureu0J  net  fiittra* 
prhta  &rtwm  fHagiatcr. 


Pro-Cancellario  ......  020 

Procuratoribus    ......  040 

Professor!  ........  020 

Bedellis    ........  170 

Registrario    .......  0     1     0 

Bibliothecario     ......  010 

Pulsatori  .......     .010 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti   ....  0    0    2 

Cista3  Communi      ...         .  0    3  10 


20 


3  If  a  Compounder  he  pays  one  Composition. 


485 


Etyologiae  JSactalaureua4  pet 

&rtium  ISaccaiaureu*,  eoifcit, 


<£.  *.  d. 

Pro-Cancellario  ......  040 

Professori  ........  020 

Oratori      ........  020 

Registrario    .......  020 

Praesentatori  .......  010 

Bibliothecario     ......  018 

Pulsatori  .....    ...  0     1     6 

Apparitor!      .......  006 

Ecclesiae  B.  Marias     ....  0    0    2 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0    0    4 

Scrutatoribus      ......  0     0     8 

Bedellis     ......     t     ,  2  14     6 

Moderatoribus    ......  030 

Procuratoribus    ......  1     1     6 

Eorum  Servis      .    .....  040 

Pro-Procuratoribus  .....  088 

Eorum  Servis     .     .     ,     ,     .     .  0     2     0 

Cistae  Communi     .....  1  17    0 


£.766 


4  If  a  Compounder  he  pays  two  Compositions. 


tfattalattretw5  net 
,  tttiilo  tnltt*  fiwigntttta  gratoti,  aalfcit, 

«£.  *.   rf. 

Pro-Cancellario 044 

Professor! 0    '2    0 

Oratori 036 

Registrario 030 

Praesentatori 014 

Bibliothecario 0     21    0 

Pulsatori 019 

Apparitori 010 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae      ....    0    0    6 
Pro  Copia  Juramenti       *     .     .    0    0    6 

Scrutatoribus 014 

Bedellis 354 

Moderatoribus    ....     .     .    O  12    0 

Procuratoribus 1  15    6 

Eorum  Servis .080 

Pro-Procuratoribus      ....     0  15    8 

Eorum  Servis .040 

Cistse  Communi  2  12     3 


£.10  14     0 


If  a  Compounder  he  pays  three  Compositions. 


487 


apologia*  »rofc00or6  p*t  &tt*ra*  lUgtaa, 


»ritt0 


<£. 


Pro-Cancellario 020 

Procuratoribus 020 

Professori 010 

Bedellis ...270 

Registrario    . 010 

Bibliothecario 014 

Pulsatori 024 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0    0    4 

Scrutatoribus 008 

Cistae  Communi 064 

£~3     4     0 


t?tofe00ot7  per  Utteras 


Pro-Cancellario       .....  040 

Procuratoribus    ......  0     6     0 

Professori      .......  030 

Bedellis     ........  3  14     0 

Registrario    .......  020 

Bibliothecario     ......  024 

Pulsatori       .......  034 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....  0     0    6 

Scrutatoribus      ......  008 

CistaB  Communi  .  2  10    2 


£.760 

6  If  a  Compounder,  he  pays  one  Composition. 

7  If  a  Compounder  he  pays  two  Compositions. 


488 


STtjcologta?  llrofeseor 8  pet  attrraa 
prtu0  ftrttum  iSacraUunm  *oUut, 

<£.  *.  rf. 

Pro-Cancellario 0     6     0 

Professori ..030 

Oratori 020 

Registrario 030 

Pragsentatori  .......     0     1     0 

Bibliothecario 030 

Pulsatori .     0     3  10 

Apparitor! 006 

Ecclesiae  B.  Mariae 002 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  ....    0    0    8 

Scrutatoribus 014 

Bedellis    ........     5     1     6 

Moderatoribus .030 

Procuratoribus 136 

Eorum  Servis 040 

Pro-Procuratoribus 088 

Eorum  Servis 020 

Cistae  Communi  234 


£.10  10     6 


If  a  Compounder  he  pays  three  Composition*. 


489 


ftrofeaaor9  per  iUtera* 
nullo  priiis  ingignitu*  gratm,  0oUnt 


Pro-Cancellario       .....  064 

Professor!      .......  030 

Oratori      ........  0     3     6 

Registrario    .......  040 

Praesentatori       ......  014 

Bibliothecario     .....     .  0    3     4 

Pulsatori  ...     .....  041 

Apparitor!     ...'..,..'010 

Ecclesiae  B.  Marias      ....  0     0     6 

Pro  Copia  Juramenti  .     .     .     .  0010 

Scrutatoribus      ......  020 

Bedellis     ........  5  12     4 

Moderatoribus    ......  0  12     0 

Procuratoribus    ......  1  17    6 

Eorum  Servis     ......  080 

Pro-Procuratoribus      .     .     .     .  0  15     8 

Eorum  Servis     .....     .  040 

Cistae  Communi  2  18     7 


£.13  18     0 


9  If  a  Compounder  he  pays  four  Compositions. 


CAUTIONS   FOR  EXERCISES 


D.D.  fcrforr 


SERMON  ........200 

Act     .........  36    0    0 

Two  Opponencies  .....     200 

Clerum     ........  10    0     0 

Determination    ......     200 

Decree,  Apr.  11,  1690.    Lib.  Stat.  p.  505. 


O.D.  fjrfore  ifH,&. 

£.    s.   d. 

Sermon 200 

Act 46     0    0 

Two  Opponencies 200 

Clerum 10    0     0 

Determination 200 

Ibid. 


491 

&*< 

£.   s.   d. 

Sermon 200 

Act 10    0    0 

Two  Opponencies 200 

Clerum 600 

Ibid. 


Jtt.».  or  15.it 

£.   s.   d. 

Two  Acts 49    0    0 

One  Act 24  10     0 

Opponency 100 

Decree,  June  10,  1766.     Lib.  Stat.  p.  512. 

is.  a. 

£.   s.  d. 
Act 20    0    0 

Decree,  Apr.  11,  1690. 

jfcjtt. 

£.   s.   d. 

Two  Acts 40    0    0 

One  Act 20     0    0 

Opponency 100 


492 


£.  s.  d. 

An  Act    ........  19  0  0 

Opponency    .......    1  0  0 

Decree,  Apr.  11,  1690. 


FEES  paid  to  the  REGISTRARY  for  MATRI- 
CULATION,— and  mode  of  Distribution. 

A  NOBLEMAN  pays 

£.    s.    d. 

Government  (Stamp) 100 

Common  Chest 7  17    6 

Registrary 126 

£.  10  o    o 


A  FELLOW-COMMONER  pays 

£.  s.   d. 

Government  (Stamp) 100 

Common  Chest 376 

Registrary 0  12     6 

£.5     0     0 


493 


A  PENSIONER  pays 

£.  A  d. 

Government  (Stamp)     ......    l    o    0 

Common  Chest    ........     1     5    o 

Registrary 050 


10     0 


A  SIZAR  pays 

£.    s.    d. 
Government  (Stamp)     ......    100 

Common  Chest    .     .....     ..039 

Registrary  .  ..........     013 


£.1     5    0 


On  occasion  of  an  extra  Matriculation, 
each  Person  pays  in  addition  10*., 
which  is  divided  as  follows : 

£.  *.   d. 

To  each  Proctor  3s.  4d 068 

To  the  Registrary 034 

£.0  10     0 


494 


PEES  paid  by  the  UNIVERSITY  OFFICERS  on 
their  ELECTION. 

The  CHANCELLOR  pays 

£.  s.   d. 

University  Marshall 500 

School-keeper 500 

Proctors'  Servants 110 

Registrar's  Servant 0  10    6 

Yeoman  Bedell ..500 

Vice-Chancellor's  Servant  .    .         .    .    0  10    6 


£.  17    2    0 


The  HIGH  STEWARD  pays 

£.  s.  d. 

University  Marshall 500 

School-keeper 500 

Proctors'  Servants 110 

Registrar's  Servants     .     .     .     .     .     .     0  10    6 

Yeoman  Bedell ..500 

Vice-Chancellor's  Servant  .  0  10     6 


£.  17    2    0 


495 


Each  MEMBER  of  PARLIAMENT  pays 

£.   9.   d. 

Registrary,  exclusive  of  Stamps  for  In- 
dentures       550 

Under-Sheriff 550 

School-keeper 220 

Marshall 220 

Proctors'  Servants 110 

Registrar's  Servant 0  10    6 

Vice-Chancellor's  Servant 0  10    6 

Yeoman  Bedell  0  10    6 


£.17    6    6 


ACTS. 

The  moneppaid  by  a  Person  on  keeping  an  Act1 
in  Divinity,.  Law,  or  Physic,  is  divided  as 
follows: 

£.  s.   d. 
School-keeper ..........    0    1     0 

Marshall 030 

Proctors'  Servants 010 

Professor's  Servant 026 

Bell-ringer 010 

<£.0     8     6 


This  money  is  paid,  although  the  Act  be  cautioned  for. 


496 

£.    *.  d. 
Stamp  for  Diploma  or  Certificate  of 

Degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts    ...     3     0  0 

Ditto  for  any  other  Degree     ....  10    0  0 
Fees  to  the  Registrary  in  each  case  ,.110 

Sealing  Fees 0  10  2 


The  money  for  Sealing  is  divided  as  folk 

£. 

Vipp-diancellor                                              O 

YWS: 

s. 
0 
0 

1 

0 

4 
1 
2 

d. 
4 
8 
0 
8 
0 
0 
6 

'Two  T^roptors  each  4^?.  . 

.     .     0 

Three  Bedells,  each  4c?.  .    . 

.     .     .     0 

Two  Scrutators,  each  4</.   . 

.     .     .     0 

Registrary 

.     .     .     0 

Marshall 

.     .     .     0 

School-keeper       »              » 

.     .     .     0 

£.0 

10 

2 

(ftompoaitton 

The  division  i<s  as  follows : 

£.    *.    d. 

Vice-Chancellor 200 

Two  Proctors,  each  £.1 200 

Two  Scrutators,  each  10$ 100 

Three  Bedells,  each  £.1.  Is 330 

Bell-ringer 034 

£.8     6     4 


49? 

£.    s.    d. 

Margaret  Professor  on  reading  his 
Lecture,  pays  to  the 

School-keeper 010 

Marshall 020 

The  same  fees  are  paid  by  every 
Doctor  of  Divinity,  on  reading  his 
Determination. 

Every  Person  who  makes  the  Speech 
in  the  Senate-House,  on  November  5, 
or  January  30,  pays  the  School-keeper  026 

Professors  on  their  Election  pay  to 
the  School-keeper7 110 

The  Esquire  Bedells  on  their  Elec- 
tion pay  to  the  School-keeper7  ...  1  1  0 

The  Commissary  on  his  Election 
pays  to  the  School-keeper 110 

The  Public  Orator  on  his  Election 
pays  to  the  School-keeper7  ....  1  1  0 

The  Librarians  and  the  Registrary 
on  their  respective  Elections,  pay  to 
the  School-keeper7 110 

The  Bell-ringer  has  for  ringing  the  Bell: 

On  account  of  the  Death  of  a 
Doctor 100 

On  account  of  the  Death  of  a 
Master  of  Arts 0  10  0 

7  Which  he  distributes  to  the  other  Servants. 
Il 


498 

£.    s.    d. 

The  Marshall  receives  for  taking  to 
the  Heads  the  Pedigree  of  a  Person 
applying  for  a  Degree  in  right  of 
Nobility 0  10  6 

He  receives  from  every  Person 
elected  into  any  Scholarship  .  .  .  0  10  6 

From  every  Person  obtaining  Sir 
William  Browne's  Prizes  ....  0  2  6 

From  Persons  obtaining  Prizes  for 
the  Hebrew  and  Hulsean  Dissertations  0  10  6 

For  every  other  Prize 050 

Proctors'  Servants  for  Sophs'  Exercises. 

They  receive  from  the  Respondent  .020 
From  the  First  Opponent      ...     0     2     0 

From  Second  and  Third  Opponents, 
each 016 

From  each  Bachelor  and  Master  of 
Arts  huddling8 020 

The  School-keeper  receives,  after  the  Bachelor 
of  Arts  Commencement,  of  the  several  Bursar* 
or  Stewards,  as  follows,  viz.  : 

£.  s.   d. 

Queen's  College  ....     0     3     4 

Emmanuel 026 

St.  Peter's 026 

Catharine  Hall     ....     0     2     6 
Pembroke 026 

8  One  shilling  of  which  is  for  the  School-keepcr. 


499 

£.   s.    d. 

Sidney  Sussex       ....     0     2     6 
Corpus  Christ!      .          ..026 

Magdalene 026 

Clare  Hall 026 

Caius 026 

Jesus 026 

Christ 026 

The  School-keeper  receives,  after  the  Master  of 
Arts  Commencement,  of  the  several  Bursars 
or  Stewards,  as  follows,  viz. : 

£.    s.    d. 

Trinity  College9  ....  0     6     8 

St.  John's .068 

Queen's 034 

Emmanuel 026 

St.  Peter's 026 

Catharine  Hall    ....  0     2     6 

Pembroke 026 

Sidney  Sussex 026 

Corpus  Christi      ....  0     2     6 

Magdalene 026 

Clare  Hall  ......  0    2    6 

Caius 026 

Jesus 026 

Christ 026 

9  Besides  the  6*.  8rf.  after  each  Commencement,  3s.  4>d. 
in  the  Buttery. 

N.  B.  The  School-keeper  receives  also  a  small  allowance  of 
Ale  after  each  Commencement  at  the  Butteries  of  the  respective 
Colleges. 

112 


500 


t>roman 

He  is  appointed  by  Letters  Patent  under  the 
hand  and  seal  of  the  Chancellor. 


He  is  appointed  hy  Letters  Patent  under  the 
hand  and  seal  of  the  Vice-Chancellor. 


INDEX. 


A. 


Page 


ABSENCE  of  a  Member  of 
the  Caput  from  a  Con- 
gregation   31,  32 

of    Vice-Chancellor  — 

power    of    Attorney    to 
act  as  Deputy  for 52 

Accession,  the  King's,  pro- 
ceedings on  that  day 80 

Additional  Examiners  of 
7th  and  8th  Classes,  ap- 
pointment of 36 

Admission  of  Vice-Chan- 
cellor   50 

of  the  Questionists  73—78 

of  Inceptors  in  Arts  93,  96 

to  all   Degrees  l6l,  et  seq. 

ad  Eundem  Gradum.  .218 

Aldermen,  oath  of,  at  Magna 
Congregatio 40 

Appeals,  proceedings  re- 
specting   415 

Appointm  ent  of  Moderators     1 6 

of   Examiners  of  the 
Questionists. 17 

of  Deputy  Proctors  18,  127 

—of  Wardens  of  the 
Market 23 

of  Pro-Proctors. .  33,  et  seq. 

Appointment  of  Assistant 
Proctors  on  particular 
occasions 35,  226 


Appointment  of  Examiners 
to  conduct  Classical  Ex- 
amination after  Admission 
adRespondendum  Quses- 
tioni 37 

to  conduct  Examina- 
tion of  Junior  Sophs  in 
the  Lent  Term 38 

of  Deputy  High  Stew- 
ard    230 

of  the  King's  Professor 

of  Civil  Law 296 

of  the  King's  Professor 

of  Physic 297 

—of  the  Lord  Almoner's 
Professor  of  Arabic 305 

of    the     Professor    of 

Modern  History 310 

of  Lownde's  Professor 

of  Astronomy 312 

Ash-Wednesday,  Clerum, 
&c.  on 83 

Assizes,  Lent,  proceedings 
at 88 

Summer,    proceedings 

at 129 

Audit,  University 100 

Rustat 102 

Dr.  Woodward's 107 

Auditors  of  the  Common 
Chest,  Election  of 16 

Oath  of..  24 


502 


INDEX. 


Page 

Auditors  of  the  University 

Press,  Election  of 16 

Oath  of 24 

of   the    Conservators' 

Accounts 127 

B. 

Bachelor  of  Arts,  must 
have  passed  the  Previous 
Examination 97 

—proceedings  respecting 
Degree  of,  at  the  "regular 

time 69,79 

Fees  paid  by 442 

Bachelor  of  Arts  ad  Bap- 
tistam,  must  have  passed 
the  Previous  Examina- 
tion    97 

. proceedings  respecting 

the  Degree  of l6l,  167 

Fees  paid  by 442 

Bachelor  of  Civil  Law,  must 
have  passed  the  Previous 
Examination 97 

proceedings  respecting 

the  Degree  of 184,  190 

• Fees  pai  I  I  y 446 

Bachelor  of  Physic  must 
have  passed  the  Previous 
Examination 97 

proceedings  respecting 

the  Degree  of 193,  196 

Fees  paid  by 449 

Bachelor  of  Divinity,  pro- 
ceedings respecting  the 

Degree  of 174,  179 

— Fees  paid  by 444 

Bachelor  of  Divinity  by 
9th  Eliz.,  proceedings  re- 
specting the  degree  of  1 79, 1 80 


Page 

Bachelor  of  Divinity,  pro- 
ceedings  respecting    his 

Act 174,177 

Fees  paid  by 444 

Bachelor    of   Music,    pro- 
ceedings   respecting  the 

Degree  of 200,  202 

Fees  paid  by 451 

Bailiffs,  Oath  taken  by 2 

Barnaby   Lecturers,  nomi- 
nation of. 109 

Election  of 112 

Barnwell   Fair,   Proclama- 
tion of 118 

Bedells  resigningtheir  staves    18 

Election  of. 236 

Benefactors,    Commemora- 
tion of 42,  119 

Bond  given  by  Proctors. . .     15 

Botanic  Garden 406 

Burgesses,  Oath  of  at  Magna 
Congregatio 40 


Caput,  Election  of 28,  31 

particulars  relatingto  31,  33 

Caution  Graces,  forms  of  155,158 
Cautions  for  Exercises  omit- 
ted  490,491 

Certificate   of  Questionists 
having  kept  the  full  num- 

berof  Terms 74 

of  Questionists  having 

passed  the  Previous  Ex- 
amination       72 

of  illness  of  Question- 
ists      74 

Chancellor,     Subject      for 

English  Poem  given  by .     65 
Election  of 223,  225 


INDEX. 


503 


Page 

Chancellor,  particulars  re- 
lating to  late  Election  of  225 

particulars  relating  to 

former  Elections  of. .  227, 229 

three  Gold  Medals  given 

by 357 

• particulars  relating  to 

Medals  given  by. . .  358,  359 

Subjects  for  English 
Poem,  and  names  of  suc- 
cessful Candidates 360 

Christmas  Day 68 

Classes  7th  and  8th,  ap- 
pointment of  additional 

Examiners  of. 36 

Classical  Examination  after 
admission  ad  Responden- 
dum  Quaestioni,  appoint- 
ment of  Examiners  to 

conduct 37 

particulars  relating  to  82, 83 

Clerum  on  October  9th 2 

before  Lent  Term 68 

: on  Ash- Wednesday ...     83 

before  Easter  Term ...   107 

on  May  8th 108 

form   of  Prayer  used 

before 439 

Combination  Papers 64 

method  of  making  421,  425 

Commemoration  of  Bene- 
factors  42,  119 

Commencement,      private, 

Grace  for 117 

proceedings  on  Satur- 
day before 119 

Sunday  before 119 

Monday  before 120 

Day 120,  126 

Common  Chest,  Election  of  the 


Page 

Keepers  and  Auditors  of    16 
Commissary,     appointment 

of 228 

Courts  held  by 130 

Compounders,    who  liable 

to  pay  as 430 

Persons   from   Oxford 

or  Dublin,  incorporated 

only 430 

Concerts  in  the  Senate- 
House,  Grace  for  allowing  117 

Congregatio,  Magna 39 

Congregations,    Statutable, 

on  Oct.  10 10 

on  Nov.  4 47 

on  Bachelors  of  Arts 

Commencement 73 

—on  day  following  the 

second  Tripos 90 

on  last   day   in    Lent 

Term 93 

• on  June  11 114 

Conservators'  accounts,  Au- 
ditor of 127 

Constables,  Oath  of 25 

Court     Leet,     proceedings 

at 104,  106 

Creation  of  Masters  and 
Doctors  in  ,  all  Facul- 
ties  .....120,  125 

Creation,  deferred 127 

by  Proxy 128 

Cycle  for  Nomination  of 
Proctors 3,  7 

D. 

Death  of  Proctor 8 

.  of  Scrutator 10 

notice  for  Election  on 
death  of  Scrutator 1  i 


504 


INDEX. 


Page 

Death  of  Taxor 20 

of  a  Member  of  the 

Caput 31 

December,    proceeding   on 

I6thof 64 

Degrees,     of    Bachelor    of 

Divinity  on  June  11 114 

Supplicats  for  all  135,  et  seq. 

presenting  to  all,  forms 

of U7,etseq. 

—-proceeding  to  all,  forms 

of 161,  et  seq. 

Degrees  by  Royal  Man- 
date, proceedings  relat- 
ing to 204,210 

Delegates,  how  chosen  418,  419 
Deputy  Proctors,  appoint- 
ment of 18,  127 

, Oathof 24 

Deputy  Taxor 23 

Diploma,  proceedings  ne- 
cessary to  obtain 219 

Discommuning,  University 

has  the  power  of 433 

form  of 433,  435 

public    submission    in 

consequence  of 435 

- of  the  Mayor 436 

of  an  Alderman 437 

of  the  Deputy  Recorder  438 

Divinity,  Bachelor  of,  Ex- 
ercises required  from. ...  174 

proceedings  relating  to 

Degree  of 174,  179 

Bachelor  of,  by  9  Eliz.  179 

Bachelor  of,  by  9  Eliz. 

Exercises  required  from  179 
Divinity,    Doctor  of,    Ex- 
ercises required  from ....  181 
— • — proceedings  relating  to  the 


Page 

Degree  of 181,  184 

Doctor  of  Divinity 180 

— of  Civil  Law,  form  of 
proceeding     to     Degree 

of 190,  192 

— of  Physic,  form  of  pro- 
ceeding to  Degree  of  197, 198 
— of  Music 202,  204 

E. 

Easter  Sunday 100 

—Term,  beginning  of . . .   1 07 

—Term,  end  of 128 

Election  of  Proctors 10 

— of  Scrutators 10 

•        of  Keepers  and  Auditors 
of  Common  Chest,  &c . . .     16 

of  Examiners  of  Ques- 

tionists 17 

ofTaxors 19 

of  the  Caput 28 

of  Pro- Proctors 34 

—of  additional  Examiners 
of  7th  and  8th  Classes ...     36 

of  Persons  to  conduct 
Classical        Examination 
after    admission  ad    Re- 
spondendum  Qusestioni .     37 
— of  Examiners  of  Junior      *»"t 

Sophs  in  Lent  Term 38 

of  Vice-Chancellor ....     48 

Chancellor 223 

High-Steward 228 

Members  of  Parliament  230 

Esquire  Bedell 236 

Public  Orator 239 

Principal  Librarian. . .   242 

Librarian 246 

— Registrary 24? 

University  Printer 247 


INDEX. 


505 


Page 

Election  of  Vintner 249 

University  Gauger  . . .  249 

University  Appraiser.  249 

School-keeper 250 

——University  Counsel 251 

Clerks    to    University 

Livings , 251 

Vicar  of  Burwell 253 

Professor  of  Anatomy .  255 

Professor  of  Botany   . .  259 

Professor   of  Mineral- 
ogy   262 

Professor  of  Common 

Law 262 

Professor  of  Chemistry  265 

Professor  of  Music 270 

Election  of  Worts'  Travel- 
ling Bachelors 271 

of  Professor  of  Divi- 
nity, Lady  Margaret's. ..   274 
— r-of    Lady     Margaret's 

Preacher 278 

of  the  King's  Professor 

of  Divinity 283 

of  the  King's  Professor 

of  Greek 290 

of  the  King's  Professor 

of  Hebrew 293 

—of  Lucasian  Professor  .  298 

of  the  Arabic  Professor  301 

of  the  Casuistical  Pro- 
fessor    305 

of  the  Plumian  Profes- 
sor    307 

of  Lownde's  Professor  312 

of  Woodwardian  Pro- 
fessor    313 

of  Norrisian  Professor  319 

of     Jacksonian     Pro- 
fessor.. .  324 


Page 

Election  of  Downing  Pro- 
fessor of  Law 326 

Downing  Professor  of 

Medicine 327 

of  Christian  Advocate  327 

of  Hulsean  Lecturer . .  329 

of  Examiners  of  Can- 
didates for  Writerships  of 
the  East  India  Company  .  330 

of  Craven's  Scholars  . .  333 

Battle's  Scholar 334 

Browne's  Scholar ....   340 

—  Davies's  Scholar 345 

Bell's  Scholars 346 

Pitt's  Scholar 348 

Tyrwhitt's  Scholars  . .  350 


69 
79 


Examination  of  Question- 
ists  in  the  Senate-House 

i         for  Smith's  Prizes 

Classical,  after  admis- 
sion ad  Respondendum 
Quaestioni 82 

G. 

Grace  for  Keepers  and 
Auditors  of  the  Common 
Chest 16 

.         for  Moderators 17 

. for  Examiners  of  the 

Questionists 17 

for     appointing      the 

Moderators  Deputy  Proc- 
tors      18 

for  salary  to  the  War- 
dens of  the  Markets 24 

—  manner  of  voting  by. .     25 

for  a  private  Com- 
mencement    117 

for  Music  in  the  Se- 
nate-House      117 


506 


INDEX. 


Page 

Grace,  for  a  month's  absence 
for  newly  created  Doc- 
tors and  Masters  of  Arts  126 

for  a  Mandate  Degree  204 

for     Examination    of 

Noblemen 212 

.  to  require  a  residence 
of  three  Terms  from  No- 
blemen   216 

Graces,  Caution 155,  et  seq. 

H. 

Honorary  Degrees,  what 
Persons  entitled  to 211 

Hulse's  Prize 402 

subjects  for,  and  names 

of  successful  Candidates  .  403 

Office  of  Christian  Ad- 
vocate   327 

Office  of  Hulsean  Lec- 
turer   329 

L 

Inceptors  in  Arts 90  et  seq. 

Incorporation  of  a  Person 
from  Oxford  or  Dublin.  .217 

J. 

January,    Sermon    on    the 

30th  of 81 

Speech  on  the  30th  of.     82 

K. 

King's  Accession,  proceed- 
ings on  the  day  of 99 


Lady  Day,  proceedings  on.     99 
Latin  Verses  for  first  Tri- 
pos, Proctors  to  provide .     84 


Latin    Verses    for    second 
Tripos,     Moderators    to 

provide 89 

Laws,  Bachelor  of. 1 84 

Examination  required  185 

Method  of  keeping  Ex- 
ercise for  the  Degree  of.  185 

Doctor  of,  proceedings 

relating  to  the  Degree  of  190 
Lent  Term,  Clerum  on  the 

day  before 68 

beginning  of 69 

Previous  Examination 

in 97 

end  of 99 

Library,  University,  funds 

for  the  support  of 407 

rules  respecting 411 

Licentiate  in  Physic 1 98 

in  Surgery 200 

M. 

Magna  Congregatio 39 

Mandate  Degrees 204 

March,  proceedings  on  the 

25th 99 

Markets,  proclamation  of. .  41 
Master  of  Arts,  Creation  of  125 
form  of  proceedings 

to  Degree  of 167 

Matriculation 6l,  99, 108 

—  Oath  taken  at 62 

—  Fees  paid  at 492, 493 

May,  Clerum  on  8th 108 

—  Sermon  on  29th 109 

Medals,  Subjects  given  out 

for 65 

—  three    given    by    the 
Chancellor 357 

—  Candidates     for     the 
Classical..  86 


INDEX. 


507 


Page 

Medals,  Examination  for.  .     86 

for  English  Poem,  list 

of  Subjects  and  successful 
Candidates  for 360 

Sir  William  Browne's, 

Subjects  when  given  out 
for 67 

—  list  of  Subjects  and 
successful  Candidates  for  380 

Members,  Prizes  given  by  .  360 

list  of  Subjects  and 

successful  Candidates. . . .  36l 

Michaelmas-day,  ceremonies 
of 1 

Michaelmas  Term,  Clerum 
on  day  before 2 

Commencement  of. ...      10 

proceedings  at  the  end 

of 64, 

Midlent  Sunday 87 

Midsummer  Fair,  proclama- 
tion of 118 

Music,  Bachelor  of,  form 
of  proceeding  to  Degree 
of 200 

Doctor  of,  form  of  pro- 
ceeding to  the  Degree  of  202 

N. 
Noblemen,  Matriculation  of    63 

Degree  of,  who  entitled 

to 211 

proceedings  relating  to  213 

to  undergo  an  exami- 
nation   212 

residen  ce  required  from  212 

the     University    may 

confer  Degree  on,  with- 
out examination  or  resi- 
dence    ,  213 


Page 

Noblemen,  the  latter  not  en- 

titled  to  vote  without  a 

residence  of  three  Terms  216 
Non-Term,  on  the  death  of 

a  Gremial 428 

proceedings  relating  to  428 

Graces  for  deferring . .  429 

Nomination,  of  Proctors, 

Cycle  for 3 

of  Pro- Proctors 33 

and  pricking  for  the 

Vice-Chancellor 44 

• of  Barnaby  Lecturers  109 

November,  proceedings  on 

the  third  of 42 

—  proceedings  on  the 

fourth  of. 48 

proceedings  on  the 

fifthof 59 

O. 

Oath  of  Mayor 2 

of  Bailiffs 2 

taken  by  Senior  Regents 

at  Election  of  Proctors ...      11 
taken  by  Senior  Non- 
Regents   at    Election   of 

Scrutators 12 

taken  by  Proctors  . .  15,  16 

taken  by  Scrutators .  15,  16 

taken  by  Taxors 22 

taken  by  Wardens  of 

the  Market 23 

taken  by  Auditors  of 

Common  Chest'  •  • 24 

taken  by  Deputy  Proc- 
tors      24 

taken  by  Proctors'  Men     25 

taken  by  Aldermen  at 

Magna  Congregatio 4-0 


508 


INDEX. 


Page 

Oath  of  Burgesses  at  Magna 
Congregatio 40 

of  Inhabitants  at  the 

same 40 

taken  by  Vice-Chan- 
cellor   51 

taken  at  Matriculation     62 

taken  by  Bachelors  of 

Arts 77 

taken  by  Inceptors  in 

Arts 95 

taken  by   Doctors  at 

Creation 122 

taken  by   Masters  of 

Arts  at  Creation 125 

taken  by  Persons  in- 
corporated from  Oxford 
or  Dublin 172 

taken      by      Esquire 

Bedell 236 

taken  by  the   Public 

Orator 239 

taken  by  principal  Li- 
brarian    246 

taken  by  Librarian . . .   246 

taken  by  Registrary . .  247 

taken  by  Gauger  and 

Appraiser 249 

—  taken  by  Professor  of 
Anatomy 259 

taken  by  the  other  Pro- 
fessors will  be  found  under 
their  respective  titles. 

P. 

Petition  for  Mandate  Degree  205 
Preachers,  Lady  Margaret's  278 

Select,  how  chosen . . .   425 

at  Assizes,  by  whom 

appointed 88 


Preachers  on  Commemora- 
tion    days,     by     whom 

appointed. 42,  119 

on  Sundays  and  Saints' 

days,  how  appointed 421 

Press,  Syndics  for 406 

Previous  Examination 97 

Privy  Counsellers,  entitled 
to  Honorary  Degrees. . .  211 

Prizes,  Chancellor's 357 

Members' 360 

Sir  W.  Browne's 378 

Person 390 

Dr.  Smith's 394 

Seaton's 394 

— —  Norris's 398 

-Hulse's 402 

Proctors,     Cycle    for     the 

nomination  of 3 

presentation  of 8 

proceedings  in  case  of 

refusal,    resignation,    or 

death 8 

neglect  of  College  to 

nominate 9 

office  of,  becoming  va- 
cant before  expiration  of 

the  year 9 

Election  of,  &c . . .  10,  et  seq. 

—  Deputy,   appointment 

of 18,  127 

Assistant 35 

Pro-Proctors,     proceedings 

respecting  appointment  of    34 
Proxy,  Vice-Chancellor  may 

be  admitted  by 53 

Creation  by 122,  128 

to  vote  at  Election  of 

Woodwardian   Professor, 
form  of  appointment  of . .  315 


INDEX. 


Q 

Qualifying    for    office     of 

Vice-Chancellor 52 

Questionists,     appointment 

of  Examiners  of 17 

Examination  of  in  the 

Senate-House 69 

Classification  of 70 

Subjects  for  Examina- 
tion of 71 

Bracketing  of. .... 72 

• Admission  of 73 

Supplicats  of 73,  75 

Certificate  of  his  having 

kept  his  full  number  of 

Terms 74, 

Certificate  of  his  having 

passed  Previous  Exami- 
nation   k  74, 

Certificate    of   illness 

of 75 

Oaths  required  from . .     77 

R. 

Refusal  to  serve  the  Office 
of  Proctor 8 

to  serve  the  Office  of 

Scrutator 10 

to  serve  the  Office  of 

Taxor 20 

Representatives,  of  Heads, 
who  may  be 28 

when  Scrutators  may 

vote  in  both  capacities  .  .  32 

Rules  for  the  choice  of  a 
Scholar  on  the  founda- 
tion of  Dr.  Battie 334 

for  the  choice  of  a 

Scholar  on  the  foundation 
of  Sir  W.Browne,.  .  342 


Rules  for  the  choice  of  a 
Scholar  on  the  founda- 
tion of  Dr.  Davies 345 

for  the  choice  of  a 
Scholar  on  the  founda- 
tion ofDr.  Bell 346 

•      for  the  foundation  of 
the  Pitt  Scholarship 348 

— —  for  the  foundation  of 
the  Tyrwhitt's  Scholar- 
ship   351 

respecting  the  Univer- 
sity Scholarships 355 

-respecting  the  Rustat 

Audit 102 

S. 

Scrutator,  proceedings  re- 
lating to 9,  et  seq. 

Scholarships,  Lord  Craven's  333 

Battle's 333 

Sir  W.  Browne's 340 

Davies's 345 

Bell's 346 

Pitt's 348 

Tyrwhitt's 350 

new  Regulations  re- 
lating to 355 

Sermons,  on  Michaelmas- 
day,  two 1 

on  November  5th  —     59 

on  King's  Accession  . .    80 

on  January  30th 81 

on  Midlent  Sunday ...     87 

at  Lent  Assizes 88 

at  King's  Chapel 99 

on  Easter  Tuesday ...   101 

onMay29th 109 

on       Commencement 

Sunday 119 


510 


INDEX, 


Page 

Sermons,  at  Summer  Assizes  1 29 
Supplicats,  forms  of,  for  all 
Degrees 135,etseq. 

T. 

Taxors,    proceedings  rela- 
ting to 19,  et  seq. 

Ten- Year-Men,     form     of 

proceeding  to  Degree. . .   179 
Term,  Michaelmas,  begin- 
ning of 10 

Michaelmas,  end  of. .     64 

Lent,  beginning  of. . .     69 

-end  of..... 99 

Easter,  beginning  of. .  107 

end  of..  .   128 


V. 

Vacancy  of  Vice-Chancel- 
lor's Office..  42 


Vice-Chancellor,  proceed- 
ings relating  to  Nomina- 
tion and  Election  of  44,  et  seq- 

Voting,  by  Grace,  manner 
of... 25 

U. 

University  Marshall,  ap- 
pointment of 500 

W. 

Woodward's  Audit 1 07 

Worts'  travelling  Scholars, 
Election  of 271 

Y. 

Yeoman  Bedell,  appoint- 
ment of..  500 


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